Help a friend in need

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by BIGEYE, Apr 11, 2004.

  1. BIGEYE

    BIGEYE Guest

    Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts itself
    down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    this.
    Please advise on how to fix.
    TIA
     
    BIGEYE, Apr 11, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. BIGEYE

    -= Hawk =- Guest

    On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:40:54 +0100, "BIGEYE" <>
    scribbled:

    >Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts itself
    >down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    >Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    >this.
    >Please advise on how to fix.


    Sounds like a heat problem.

    --
    'What Profiteth It A Kingdom If The Oxen Be Deflated?'
    Riddles II, v3
    - T. Pratchett
     
    -= Hawk =-, Apr 11, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. BIGEYE

    BIGEYE Guest

    Wasn't there a virus going about a couple of months ago which did this to
    infected pc's?

    "-= Hawk =-" <> wrote in message
    news:vvni705fav01qpvj0l3vfgb65nmrv8fn3q@news-server...
    > On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:40:54 +0100, "BIGEYE" <>
    > scribbled:
    >
    > >Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    itself
    > >down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > >Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    > >this.
    > >Please advise on how to fix.

    >
    > Sounds like a heat problem.
    >
    > --
    > 'What Profiteth It A Kingdom If The Oxen Be Deflated?'
    > Riddles II, v3
    > - T. Pratchett
     
    BIGEYE, Apr 11, 2004
    #3
  4. BIGEYE

    -= Hawk =- Guest

    On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 16:21:44 +0100, "BIGEYE" <>
    scribbled:

    >Wasn't there a virus going about a couple of months ago which did this to
    >infected pc's?


    Beats me, I don't get viruses.... like I said, to me, it sounds like
    heat.

    --
    'What Profiteth It A Kingdom If The Oxen Be Deflated?'
    Riddles II, v3
    - T. Pratchett
     
    -= Hawk =-, Apr 11, 2004
    #4
  5. BIGEYE

    THEOLDONE Guest

    It's a Virus. I just received an "Urgent" from Dell, via their "Dell Suports
    Alert" that tells about this virus and what it does. I performs shut downs
    that U describe...Dell instructs you on how to remove. try the Dell site to
    C if they have available for non Dell users.

    HTH
    "-= Hawk =-" <> wrote in message
    news:vvni705fav01qpvj0l3vfgb65nmrv8fn3q@news-server...
    > On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:40:54 +0100, "BIGEYE" <>
    > scribbled:
    >
    > >Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    itself
    > >down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > >Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    > >this.
    > >Please advise on how to fix.

    >
    > Sounds like a heat problem.
    >
    > --
    > 'What Profiteth It A Kingdom If The Oxen Be Deflated?'
    > Riddles II, v3
    > - T. Pratchett
     
    THEOLDONE, Apr 11, 2004
    #5
  6. BIGEYE

    BIGEYE Guest

    Thanks all. Much appreciated.
    "THEOLDONE" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It's a Virus. I just received an "Urgent" from Dell, via their "Dell

    Suports
    > Alert" that tells about this virus and what it does. I performs shut

    downs
    > that U describe...Dell instructs you on how to remove. try the Dell site

    to
    > C if they have available for non Dell users.
    >
    > HTH
    > "-= Hawk =-" <> wrote in message
    > news:vvni705fav01qpvj0l3vfgb65nmrv8fn3q@news-server...
    > > On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:40:54 +0100, "BIGEYE" <>
    > > scribbled:
    > >
    > > >Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    > itself
    > > >down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > > >Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something

    about
    > > >this.
    > > >Please advise on how to fix.

    > >
    > > Sounds like a heat problem.
    > >
    > > --
    > > 'What Profiteth It A Kingdom If The Oxen Be Deflated?'
    > > Riddles II, v3
    > > - T. Pratchett

    >
    >
     
    BIGEYE, Apr 11, 2004
    #6
  7. BIGEYE

    PuppyKatt Guest

    Sounds like the Blaster virus. What Operating System does your friend
    have?

    "BIGEYE" <> wrote in message
    news:gRcec.31986$Y%9.net...
    : Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts
    itself
    : down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    : Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something
    about
    : this.
    : Please advise on how to fix.
    : TIA
    :
    :
     
    PuppyKatt, Apr 11, 2004
    #7
  8. BIGEYE

    tigercat Guest

    good luck, my brother recently had the same problem. the virus was laying
    dorment on his Windows ME system and didn't manifest itelf until he upgraded
    to Win XP.


    http://www.microsoft.com/security/incident/blast.asp

    http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/venc/data/w32.blaster.worm.rem
    oval.tool.html

    http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/FixBlast.exe



    FROM SYMANTEC......


    W32.Blaster.Worm Removal Tool
    Discovered on: August 11, 2003
    Last Updated on: April 1, 2004 04:50:15 PM GDT


    Version 1.0.6.1 of the W32.Blaster.Worm Removal Tool will remove the
    following threats as well as their side effects:
    W32.Blaster.Worm
    W32.Blaster.B.Worm
    W32.Blaster.C.Worm
    W32.Blaster.D.Worm
    W32.Blaster.E.Worm
    W32.Blaster.F.Worm


    Important Notes:
    W32.Blaster.Worm exploits the DCOM RPC vulnerability. This is described in
    Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-026, and a patch is available there. You
    must download and install the patch. In many cases, you will need to do this
    before continuing with the removal instructions. If you are not able to
    remove the infection or prevent re-infection using the following
    instructions, first download and install the patch.

    Additional information, and an alternate site from which to download the
    Microsoft patch is available in the Microsoft article What You Should Know
    About the Blaster Worm and Its Variants.

    Because of the way the worm works, it may be difficult to connect to the
    Internet to obtain the patch, definitions, or removal tool before the worm
    shuts down the computer. It has been reported that, for users of Windows XP,
    activating the Windows XP firewall may allow you to download and install the
    patch, obtain virus definitions, and run the removal tool. This may also
    work with other firewalls, although this has not been confirmed.

    What the tool does
    The W32.Blaster.Worm Removal Tool does the following:
    Terminates the W32.Blaster.Worm viral processes.
    Deletes the W32.Blaster.Worm files.
    Deletes the dropped files.
    Deletes the registry values that have been added.

    Command-line switches available with this tool


    Switch


    Description

    /HELP, /H, /?
    Displays the help message.

    /NOFIXREG
    Disables registry repair. (We do not recommend using this switch.)

    /SILENT, /S
    Enables silent mode.

    /LOG=<path name>
    Creates a log file where <path name> is the location in which to store the
    tool's output. By default, this switch creates the log file, FixBlast.log,
    in the same folder from which the removal tool was executed.

    /MAPPED
    Scans the mapped network drives. (We do not recommend using this switch.
    Refer to the following Notes.)

    /START
    Forces the tool to immediately start scanning.

    /EXCLUDE=<path>
    Excludes the specified <path> from scanning. (We do not recommend using this
    switch.)

    Note: Using the /MAPPED switch does not ensure the complete removal of the
    virus on the remote computer, because:
    Scanning the mapped drives scans the mapped folders only. This action may
    not include all the folders on the remote computer, leading to missed
    detections.
    If a viral file is detected on the mapped drive, the removal will fail if a
    program on the remote computer uses this file.

    For these reasons, run the tool on every computer.

    Restoring Internet connectivity and preventing the computer from shutting
    down
    In many cases, on both Windows 2000 and XP, changing the settings for the
    Remote Call Procedure (RPC) service may allow you to connect to the Internet
    to obtain downloads, and will stop the computer from shutting down.

    Click Start > Run. (The Run dialog box appears.)
    Type:

    SERVICES.MSC /S

    in the open line, and then click OK. (The Services window opens.)


    In the right pane, locate the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) service.



    CAUTION: A service named Remote Procedure Call (RPC) Locator exists. Do not
    confuse the two.


    Right-click the Remote Procedure Call (RPC) service, and then click
    Properties.
    Click the Recovery tab.
    Using the drop-down lists, change First failure, Second failure, and
    Subsequent failures to "Restart the Service."
    Click Apply, and then click OK.


    CAUTION: Make sure that you change these settings back once you have removed
    the worm.

    Obtaining and running the tool

    Note: You need administrative rights to run this tool on Windows 2000 or
    Windows XP.

    WARNING: For network administrators. If you are running MS Exchange 2000
    Server, we recommend that you exclude the M drive from the scan by running
    the tool from a command line with the Exclude switch. For more information,
    read the Microsoft knowledge base article, "XADM: Do Not Back Up or Scan
    Exchange 2000 Drive M" (Article 298924).
    Download the FixBlast.exe file from:

    http://securityresponse.symantec.com/avcenter/FixBlast.exe



    Save the file to a convenient location, such as your downloads folder or the
    Windows Desktop (or removable media that is known to be uninfected, if
    possible).
    To check the authenticity of the digital signature, refer to the section,
    "Digital signature."
    Close all the running programs before running the tool.
    If you are running Windows XP, then disable System Restore. Refer to the
    section, "System Restore option in Windows Me/XP," for additional details.


    CAUTION: If you are running Windows XP, we strongly recommend that you do
    not skip this step. The removal procedure may be unsuccessful if Windows XP
    System Restore is not disabled, because Windows prevents outside programs
    from modifying System Restore.

    Double-click the FixBlast.exe file to start the removal tool.
    Click Start to begin the process, and then allow the tool to run.


    Note: If, when running the tool, you see a message that the tool was not
    able to remove one or more files, run the tool in Safe mode. Shut down the
    computer, turn off the power, and wait 30 seconds. Restart the computer in
    Safe mode and then run the tool again. All the Windows 32-bit operating
    systems, except Windows NT, can be restarted in Safe mode. For instructions,
    read the document "How to start the computer in Safe Mode."

    Restart the computer.
    Run the removal tool again to ensure that the system is clean.
    If you are running Windows XP, then re-enable System Restore.
    Run LiveUpdate to make sure that you are using the most current virus
    definitions.

    When the tool has finished running, you will see a message indicating
    whether W32.Blaster.Worm infected the computer. In the case of a worm
    removal, the program displays the following results:
    Total number of the scanned files
    Number of deleted files
    Number of terminated viral processes
    Number of fixed registry entries

    Digital signature
    FixBlast.exe is digitally signed. Symantec recommends that you only use
    copies of FixBlast.exe that have been directly downloaded from the Symantec
    Security Response Web site. To check the authenticity of the digital
    signature, follow these steps:
    Go to http://www.wmsoftware.com/free.htm.
    Download and save the Chktrust.exe file to the same folder in which you
    saved FixBlast.exe (for example, C:\Downloads).
    Depending on your operating system, do one of the following:
    Click Start, point to Programs, and then click MS-DOS Prompt.
    Click Start, point to Programs, click Accessories, and then click Command
    Prompt.


    Change to the folder in which FixBlast.exe and Chktrust.exe are stored, and
    then type:

    chktrust -i FixBlast.exe

    For example, if you saved the file to the C:\Downloads folder, you would
    enter the following commands:

    cd\
    cd downloads
    chktrust -i FixBlast.exe

    Press Enter after typing each command. If the digital signature is valid,
    you will see the following:

    Do you want to install and run "W32.Blaster.Worm Removal Tool" signed on
    9/1/2003 3:17 PM and distributed by Symantec Corporation?


    Notes:
    The date and time displayed in this dialog box will be adjusted to your time
    zone if your computer is not set to the Pacific time zone.
    If you are using Daylight Saving time, the displayed time will be exactly
    one hour earlier.
    If this dialog box does not appear, there are two possible reasons:
    The tool is not from Symantec. Unless you are sure that the tool is
    legitimate and that you downloaded it from the legitimate Symantec Web site,
    do not run it.
    The tool is from Symantec and is legitimate, however, your operating system
    was previously instructed to always trust content from Symantec. For
    information on this and on how to view the confirmation dialog again, read
    the document "How to restore the Publisher Authenticity confirmation dialog
    box."


    Click Yes to close the dialog box.
    Type Exit, and then press Enter. This will close the MS-DOS session.

    System Restore option in Windows XP
    Users of Windows XP should temporarily turn off System Restore. Windows XP
    uses this feature, which is enabled by default, to restore the files on your
    computer in case they become damaged. If a virus, worm, or Trojan infects a
    computer, System Restore may back up the virus, worm, or Trojan on the
    computer.

    Windows prevents outside programs, including antivirus programs, from
    modifying System Restore. Therefore, antivirus programs or tools cannot
    remove threats in the System Restore folder. As a result, System Restore has
    the potential of restoring an infected file on your computer, even after you
    have cleaned the infected files from all the other locations.

    Also, in some cases, online scanners may detect a threat in the System
    Restore folder even though you scanned your computer with an antivirus
    program and did not find any infected files.

    For instructions on how to turn off System Restore, read your Windows
    documentation, or the article "How to turn off or turn on Windows XP System
    Restore"


    How to run the tool from a floppy disk
    Insert the floppy disk, which contains the FixBlast.exe file, in the floppy
    disk drive.
    Click Start, and then click Run.
    Type the following:

    a:\FixBlast.exe

    and then click OK:

    Note: There are no spaces in the command, a:\FixBlast.exe.


    Click Start to begin the process, and then allow the tool to run.
    If you are using Windows Me, re-enable System Restore.


    Revision History:

    September 1, 2003: Posted version 1.0.6.1 with support for variants through
    F.
    August 20, 2003: Added information regarding running the tool on Exchange
    servers.
    August 14, 2003: Posted version 1.0.4 with added support for
    W32.Blaster.C.Worm.
    August 13, 2003: Posted version 1.0.2 with added support for
    W32.Blaster.B.Worm.





    ===========================================================================
    AND FROM MICROSOFT..........................


    What You Should Know About the Blaster Worm and Its Variants

    Published: August 11, 2003 | Updated: January 22, 2004


    At 11:34 A.M. Pacific Time on August 11, Microsoft began investigating a
    worm reported by Microsoft Product Support Services (PSS). The worm,
    W32.Blaster.Worm and its variants, exploits a security issue that was
    addressed by Microsoft Security Bulletin MS03-026. This worm also has the
    potential to exploit a similar issue that is addressed by Microsoft Security
    Bulletin MS03-039. These issues concern the Remote Procedure Call (RPC)
    function.
    Important Information

    Download the update directly from the Microsoft Download Center and install
    it
    Who Is Vulnerable?

    Your computer is not vulnerable to the Blaster worm if you downloaded and
    installed the security update that was addressed by Security Bulletin
    MS03-026 prior to August 11, the date the Blaster worm was discovered.
    However, you will need to download and install the update addressed by
    Security Bulletin MS03-039 in order to help ensure that you are not
    vulnerable to future variants of the Blaster worm.
    Products Affected by This Worm
    Microsoft Windows NT® 4.0
    Microsoft Windows 2000
    Microsoft Windows XP
    Microsoft Windows ServerT 2003
    Products Not Affected by This Worm
    Microsoft Windows Millennium (Windows Me)

    Note Microsoft Windows 98, Windows 98 Second Edition (SE), and Microsoft
    Windows 95 also are not affected by this issue. However, these products are
    no longer supported. Users of these products are strongly encouraged to
    upgrade to later versions.

    How to Tell If the Worm Is Affecting Your Computer

    Some customers whose computers have been infected may not notice the
    presence of the worm at all, while others who are not infected may
    experience problems because the worm is attempting to attack their computer.
    Typical symptoms may include Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 systems
    rebooting every few minutes without user input, or Windows NT 4.0 and
    Windows 2000 systems becoming unresponsive.



    Shutdown error. If your computer is infected, you may see this error
    message.

    Whether you are experiencing these symptoms or not, Microsoft recommends
    that you take the following action immediately:
    If you're running Windows XP or Windows 2000, follow all Steps 1-4 for home
    users below.
    If you're running Windows Server 2003 or Windows NT 4.0, follow Steps 1-3
    for home users below.
    Action for Network Administrators

    Microsoft recommends that network administrators take the following action
    immediately:
    Read the Microsoft Product Support Services (PSS) Security Response Team
    alert for technical guidance.
    4 Steps for Home Users

    If you are using Windows NT 4.0, Windows 2000, Windows XP, or Windows Server
    2003, you should follow the steps in this sequence to help protect your
    computer and to recover if your computer has been infected.
    1. Enable a Firewall


    Make sure you have a firewall activated to help protect your computer
    against infection before you take other steps. If your computer has been
    infected, activating firewall software will help limit the effects of the
    worm on your computer.

    The latest Windows operating systems have a firewall built in. Windows XP
    and Windows Server 2003 users should print or save the following
    instructions for how to enable their firewall.

    If your computer is rebooting repeatedly, disconnect from the Internet
    before you enable your firewall. To disconnect your computer from the
    Internet:
    Broadband connection users: Locate the telephone cable that runs from your
    external DSL or cable modem and unplug that cable either from the modem or
    from the telephone jack.
    Dial-up connection users: Locate the telephone cable that runs from the
    modem inside your computer to your telephone jack and unplug that cable
    either from the telephone jack or from your computer.

    Follow the instructions provided for your operating system, and then
    reconnect to the Internet.
    Windows XP users: Click here for instructions.
    Windows Server 2003 users: Click here for instructions.
    Windows NT 4.0 and Windows 2000 users: You will need to install a
    third-party firewall. Most firewall software for home users is available in
    free or trial versions. Check the following resources for more information
    on personal firewalls:
    McAfee Security
    Symantec
    ZoneAlarm Pro (Zone Labs)
    Tiny Personal Firewall (Tiny Software)
    BlackICE PC Protection (Internet Security Systems)
    Windows 2000 users: Alternatively, you can take steps to block the affected
    ports so that your computer can be updated. Here are some modified
    instructions from the TechNet article HOW TO: Configure TCP/IP Filtering in
    Windows 2000.
    2. Update Windows


    If you have disconnected from the Internet, remember to reconnect before you
    take next steps. Download and install the security update addressed in
    Security Bulletin MS03-039 (824146) for the version of Windows that you are
    using from Windows Update.

    When you get to the Windows Update site, scan your computer for any critical
    updates that you need, and then install them. To do that:
    Click Scan for Updates next to the green arrow near the center of your
    screen.
    Note It may take several minutes for the scan to complete.
    After the scan completes, under Pick updates to install on the left side of
    your screen, click Critical Updates and Service Packs.
    A list of updates appears. The update related to Security Bulletin MS03-039
    is identified by the number 824146.
    Click Review and install updates near the center of your screen to begin
    downloading and installing the updates.
    Get the Security Update from Windows Update
    Click here to go to the Windows Update website.
    3. Use Antivirus Software


    Use antivirus software and make sure you have the latest updates installed.
    There are several variants of this worm, and the most up-to-date information
    about them can be found at your antivirus vendor's website.
    If you already have antivirus software installed, go to your antivirus
    vendor's website to get the latest updates, also known as virus definitions.
    If you do not have antivirus software installed, get it. The following
    vendors participating in the Microsoft Virus Information Alliance (VIA)
    offer antivirus products for home users:
    Network Associates
    Trend Micro
    Symantec

    Learn about Microsoft's Virus Information Alliance.
    4. Remove the Worm


    If you think there is even the slightest possibility that your computer
    might be infected, use the free worm removal tool available at your
    preferred antivirus software vendor's website:
    Network Associates
    Trend Micro
    Symantec
    Computer Associates
    For Technical Assistance

    Contact your antivirus vendor for assistance with identifying or removing
    virus or worm infections. If you need more help with virus-related issues,
    please contact PSS. We are currently experiencing a high call volume and
    apologize for any delay in responding.
    For Microsoft Product Support Services within the United States and Canada,
    call toll-free (866) PCSAFETY (727-2338).
    For worldwide support, contact your local Microsoft office.




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    "BIGEYE" <> wrote in message
    news:gRcec.31986$Y%9.net...
    > Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    itself
    > down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    > this.
    > Please advise on how to fix.
    > TIA
    >
    >
     
    tigercat, Apr 11, 2004
    #8
  9. BIGEYE

    SgtMinor Guest

    Do you get your email at http://www.mspatch.com?

    BIGEYE wrote:
    >
    > Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts itself
    > down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    > this.
    > Please advise on how to fix.
    > TIA
     
    SgtMinor, Apr 11, 2004
    #9
  10. BIGEYE

    BIGEYE Guest

    No, why?

    "SgtMinor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Do you get your email at http://www.mspatch.com?
    >
    > BIGEYE wrote:
    > >
    > > Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    itself
    > > down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > > Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something

    about
    > > this.
    > > Please advise on how to fix.
    > > TIA
     
    BIGEYE, Apr 11, 2004
    #10
  11. BIGEYE

    SgtMinor Guest

    It causes spam to be sent to that address. 'Spambots' regularly harvest
    addresses off usenet, and these are sold to spammers. The best way to
    avoid this is to create ("munge") an unusable address. Take a look here
    for some ideas:
    http://members.aol.com/emailfaq/mungfaq.html

    BIGEYE wrote:
    >
    > No, why?
    >
    > "SgtMinor" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Do you get your email at http://www.mspatch.com?
    > >
    > > BIGEYE wrote:
    > > >
    > > > Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    > itself
    > > > down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > > > Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something

    > about
    > > > this.
    > > > Please advise on how to fix.
    > > > TIA
     
    SgtMinor, Apr 11, 2004
    #11
  12. BIGEYE spilled my beer when they jumped on the table and proclaimed in
    <wrdec.31995$Y%9.net>

    > Wasn't there a virus going about a couple of months ago which did this to
    > infected pc's?


    That was the Blaster virus and it's variants. It was usually a certain
    number of seconds after the RPC service started...

    NOI
     
    Thund3rstruck_N0i, Apr 11, 2004
    #12
  13. BIGEYE

    Unknown Guest

    Probably the Blaster virus.
    "BIGEYE" <> wrote in message
    news:wrdec.31995$Y%9.net...
    > Wasn't there a virus going about a couple of months ago which did this to
    > infected pc's?
    >
    > "-= Hawk =-" <> wrote in message
    > news:vvni705fav01qpvj0l3vfgb65nmrv8fn3q@news-server...
    > > On Sun, 11 Apr 2004 15:40:54 +0100, "BIGEYE" <>
    > > scribbled:
    > >
    > > >Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it shuts

    > itself
    > > >down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just now.
    > > >Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something about
    > > >this.
    > > >Please advise on how to fix.

    > >
    > > Sounds like a heat problem.
    > >
    > > --
    > > 'What Profiteth It A Kingdom If The Oxen Be Deflated?'
    > > Riddles II, v3
    > > - T. Pratchett

    >
    >
     
    Unknown, Apr 12, 2004
    #13
  14. BIGEYE

    BIGEYE Guest

    Thanks all, problem solved.
    "SgtMinor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > It causes spam to be sent to that address. 'Spambots' regularly harvest
    > addresses off usenet, and these are sold to spammers. The best way to
    > avoid this is to create ("munge") an unusable address. Take a look here
    > for some ideas:
    > http://members.aol.com/emailfaq/mungfaq.html
    >
    > BIGEYE wrote:
    > >
    > > No, why?
    > >
    > > "SgtMinor" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Do you get your email at http://www.mspatch.com?
    > > >
    > > > BIGEYE wrote:
    > > > >
    > > > > Friend of mine has a problem with his pc. After it boots up, it

    shuts
    > > itself
    > > > > down again after about a minute. This is all the info I have just

    now.
    > > > > Suspect this could be a virus as I seem to recall reading something

    > > about
    > > > > this.
    > > > > Please advise on how to fix.
    > > > > TIA
     
    BIGEYE, Apr 12, 2004
    #14
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