Hefty licensing requirements for Dimdows Vista

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 2, 2005.

  1. It had to happen...

    One of Microsoft's arguments against Open Source has been the cost of
    switching existing Windows machines to another OS. Well, guess what: the
    costs of upgrading to Windows Vista are going to be pretty high, too.
    And compared to that, at least one major customer (the Office of State
    Revenue in New South Wales) has decided that Linux is going to be the
    more cost-effective option by far.

    Details at <http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php?id=1585732244&eid=50>.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 2, 2005
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    thingy Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > It had to happen...
    >
    > One of Microsoft's arguments against Open Source has been the cost of
    > switching existing Windows machines to another OS. Well, guess what: the
    > costs of upgrading to Windows Vista are going to be pretty high, too.
    > And compared to that, at least one major customer (the Office of State
    > Revenue in New South Wales) has decided that Linux is going to be the
    > more cost-effective option by far.
    >
    > Details at <http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php?id=1585732244&eid=50>.


    Considering an upgrade to XP from 2000 is already $500 odd that is bad
    enough....

    Then there is the matter in of data storage and freedom to access it, at
    what stage will people realise this lockin is bad I wonder...(I know
    some Governments/states have).

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Oct 2, 2005
    #2
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  3. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Peter Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > One of Microsoft's arguments against Open Source has been the cost of
    > switching existing Windows machines to another OS. Well, guess what: the
    > costs of upgrading to Windows Vista are going to be pretty high, too.
    > And compared to that, at least one major customer (the Office of State
    > Revenue in New South Wales) has decided that Linux is going to be the
    > more cost-effective option by far.
    >
    > Details at <http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php?id=1585732244&eid=50>.


    Competition is one way to keep MS in check. Because wider use of Linux
    benefits everyone, even people who never use it themselves.



    Peter
     
    Peter, Oct 2, 2005
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    Peter <> wrote:

    >Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >> One of Microsoft's arguments against Open Source has been the cost of
    >> switching existing Windows machines to another OS. Well, guess what: the
    >> costs of upgrading to Windows Vista are going to be pretty high, too.
    >> And compared to that, at least one major customer (the Office of State
    >> Revenue in New South Wales) has decided that Linux is going to be the
    >> more cost-effective option by far.
    >>
    >> Details at <http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php?id=1585732244&eid=50>.

    >
    >Competition is one way to keep MS in check. Because wider use of Linux
    >benefits everyone, even people who never use it themselves.


    There is already the expectation among some that Steve Ballmer will make
    another special trip, with another extra-special deal, and we may yet
    see the OSR come back round to Windows after all.
     
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 2, 2005
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    thingy Guest

    Peter wrote:
    > Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    >
    >>One of Microsoft's arguments against Open Source has been the cost of
    >>switching existing Windows machines to another OS. Well, guess what: the
    >>costs of upgrading to Windows Vista are going to be pretty high, too.
    >>And compared to that, at least one major customer (the Office of State
    >>Revenue in New South Wales) has decided that Linux is going to be the
    >>more cost-effective option by far.
    >>
    >>Details at <http://www.linuxworld.com.au/index.php?id=1585732244&eid=50>.

    >
    >
    > Competition is one way to keep MS in check. Because wider use of Linux
    > benefits everyone, even people who never use it themselves.
    >
    >
    >
    > Peter
    >
    >
    >


    Fair competition is not the issue, with it everybody wins. MS's dodgy
    business practices are, though if you look at the likes of lexmark etc,
    MS are not alone in their dis-honest behaviour IMHO.

    regards

    Thing
     
    thingy, Oct 2, 2005
    #5
  6. T'was the Mon, 03 Oct 2005 06:58:11 +1300 when I remembered thingy
    <> saying something like this:

    >Fair competition is not the issue, with it everybody wins. MS's dodgy
    >business practices are, though if you look at the likes of lexmark etc,
    >MS are not alone in their dis-honest behaviour IMHO.


    I just posted a message on www.thespoke.net discussing my views on
    Microsoft's future versus open source software. It goes like this:

    Does open source software have a future? Sure, it does have a future.
    I'm not entirely too sure where this leaves Microsoft, but I do know,
    like IBM, Microsoft needs to revamp itself to stop becoming a thing of
    the past.

    Obviously, the two main advantages to open source software is that
    it's free and free. Free like free beer. You can download it, I can
    download it. I can download it and sell it if I wanted. The local
    computer store here at Windows XP Professional Full Retail for about
    $700NZ. On the other hand, I bought the Fedora Core 3 DVD which
    includes a lot more software (I wont get into a debate about the
    quality, just mentioning the quantity for now) for about $5NZ. That's
    a price difference of about, $695NZ or about $480US.

    Open source software is also free as in speech. Say you've got a
    problem with .NET 2.0. Something's not quite right. You've discovered
    a bug. So you email Microsoft, then look into it, decide whether or
    not it's worth fixing, then put it into the next bugfix to be rolled
    out through http://windowsupdate.microsoft.com. Until that happens,
    you're stuck with the bug, so either you make workarounds or you
    curse. With open source software, the source is available for you to
    work with. It's all there. See a problem? Fix it yourself! Go into the
    source, make the change, and then give everyone else in the community
    the change:) That way everybody wins. And like Wikis, just because any
    can change the source code (or the page contents) it doesn't mean that
    people maliciously make changes, or that when they do, odds are there
    are people who spot that straight away and undo that malicious
    changes. That's why http://www.wikipedia.org works, and works really
    well.

    If you look at the growth of open source software, you'll see it's
    been fantastic. I remember using Peanut Linux sometime around 1999 and
    thinking that with was nothing compared to the spit and polish that
    was Windows 98 (at the time). Now when I look at say, Windows XP
    Professional and compare it to Xandros Desktop 3.0, to be honest,
    there's not that much different, except $480US.

    And I think herein lies the problem for Microsoft. Linux has never
    before been "good enough" for the common person. But if my fiance's
    family can use Linux without having any problems, then I believe than
    Linux (especially with http://www.ubuntu.org on the horizon) has
    become a "good enough" operating system for the masses who use Office
    and Internet and send the occasional email. How will Microsoft
    convince those people to upgrade to Vista? Especially when a lot of
    the people aren't really using all of the features of Windows XP.

    So I think there is a future for open source. Not all open source of
    course, goodbye Open Solaris, it was nice knowing you. Just because
    you open source a project doesn't mean that's the end of all your
    development problems. But I think it's hard to compete with open
    source software using traditional business models. Microsoft can't
    drop prices lower than free. Microsoft will need to compete on
    software quality, polish of the software and quality documentation to
    be able to not just stand, but make headway against the coming Linux
    storm.

    I know Microsoft can do it. But be warned. The days of Peanut Linux
    are over. Linux is now a big dog, with the likes of IBM and Oracle
    behind it. Microsoft's going to have to work very hard over the next
    10 years at least.
    --
    Cheers,

    Waylon Kenning.
     
    Waylon Kenning, Oct 3, 2005
    #6
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