HDR (Photomatix) from the one photograph.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Peter Jason, Nov 16, 2007.

  1. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    I have been going over some of my old
    photographs, especially the contrasty ones,
    to try and redeem them.

    If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    two photos from one, one with the shadows
    fixed, and one with the highlights darkened,
    and then combine them with Photomatix, then
    I get a presentable whole.

    Has anyone used this method too, because it
    saves the tedious layering process in PS.

    Is there some sort of downside?

    PJ
     
    Peter Jason, Nov 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. Peter Jason

    Neil Pugh Guest

    In message <fhjfhj$23j4$>, Peter Jason
    <> writes
    >I have been going over some of my old
    >photographs, especially the contrasty ones,
    >to try and redeem them.
    >
    >If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    >two photos from one, one with the shadows
    >fixed, and one with the highlights darkened,
    >and then combine them with Photomatix, then
    >I get a presentable whole.
    >
    >Has anyone used this method too, because it
    >saves the tedious layering process in PS.
    >
    >Is there some sort of downside?
    >
    >PJ
    >
    >

    I've dropped a few of my efforts onto the web for you to have a look at:

    http://www.freenetpages.co.uk/hp/neil_pugh/HDRPhotos/index.html

    Most are from a single RAW, letting Photomatix sort it out. One is from
    a three JPGs (one as taken, one lightened and one darkened as you
    outlined above).

    Some photos work better than others for Photomatix. It's awfully easy to
    get some very odd colours and fringes (as you will see from a couple of
    the examples I've given!). I'm still playing with HDR, and as you will
    see from the examples, I'm certainly no expert.

    Regards,
    --
    Neil Pugh
     
    Neil Pugh, Nov 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. Peter Jason

    Douglas Guest

    On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 18:06:18 +1100, Peter Jason wrote:

    > I have been going over some of my old photographs, especially the
    > contrasty ones, to try and redeem them.
    >
    > If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate two photos from one, one
    > with the shadows fixed, and one with the highlights darkened, and then
    > combine them with Photomatix, then I get a presentable whole.
    >
    > Has anyone used this method too, because it saves the tedious layering
    > process in PS.
    >
    > Is there some sort of downside?
    >
    > PJ


    I'm not sure what you find about Photoshop's HDR that drives you to
    Photomatix. You can use HDR in Photoshop with one image. Just develop
    high and low, save as TIFF files and use them. I frequently do it when I
    need to recover blown highlights.

    Douglas



    --
    If you don't defend your rights... You end up without any!
     
    Douglas, Nov 17, 2007
    #3
  4. Peter Jason

    Guest

    On Nov 16, 1:06 am, "Peter Jason" <> wrote:
    > I have been going over some of my old
    > photographs, especially the contrasty ones,
    > to try and redeem them.
    >
    > If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    > two photos from one, one with the shadows
    > fixed, and one with the highlights darkened,
    > and then combine them with Photomatix, then
    > I get a presentable whole.
    >
    > Has anyone used this method too, because it
    > saves the tedious layering process in PS.
    >
    > Is there some sort of downside?
    >
    > PJ


    I used photomatix to recover old photos (both digital or scanned
    photos) and convert into HDR. Check them at
    http://picasaweb.google.com/aniramca/Photomatix_HDR
    All photos come from a single JPEG file, or scanned from a print into
    JPEG file. I usually create duplicates using Gamma correction in my
    old Paint shop Pro version 6 (or 7?). I made 2 under exposures
    (usually with gamma = 25% and 50-60%, and 2 over exposures (usually
    gamma = 190-200% and 360-400%).
     
    , Nov 17, 2007
    #4
  5. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Nov 16, 1:06 am, "Peter Jason" <> wrote:
    >> I have been going over some of my old
    >> photographs, especially the contrasty ones,
    >> to try and redeem them.
    >>
    >> If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    >> two photos from one, one with the shadows
    >> fixed, and one with the highlights darkened,
    >> and then combine them with Photomatix, then
    >> I get a presentable whole.
    >>
    >> Has anyone used this method too, because it
    >> saves the tedious layering process in PS.
    >>
    >> Is there some sort of downside?
    >>
    >> PJ

    >
    > I used photomatix to recover old photos (both digital or scanned
    > photos) and convert into HDR. Check them at
    > http://picasaweb.google.com/aniramca/Photomatix_HDR
    > All photos come from a single JPEG file, or scanned from a print into
    > JPEG file. I usually create duplicates using Gamma correction in my
    > old Paint shop Pro version 6 (or 7?). I made 2 under exposures
    > (usually with gamma = 25% and 50-60%, and 2 over exposures (usually
    > gamma = 190-200% and 360-400%).



    Well, those are without a doubt the must ass with terd ugly things I have
    ever seen.

    The Spider

    --
    Ignorance really is bliss, just look how happy President Bush is.
     
    The Spider Formally Seated Next To Little Miss Muf, Nov 17, 2007
    #5
  6. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Nov 16, 1:06 am, "Peter Jason"
    > <> wrote:
    >> I have been going over some of my old
    >> photographs, especially the contrasty
    >> ones,
    >> to try and redeem them.
    >>
    >> If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    >> two photos from one, one with the shadows
    >> fixed, and one with the highlights
    >> darkened,
    >> and then combine them with Photomatix,
    >> then
    >> I get a presentable whole.
    >>
    >> Has anyone used this method too, because
    >> it
    >> saves the tedious layering process in PS.
    >>
    >> Is there some sort of downside?
    >>
    >> PJ

    >
    > I used photomatix to recover old photos
    > (both digital or scanned
    > photos) and convert into HDR. Check them at
    > http://picasaweb.google.com/aniramca/Photomatix_HDR
    > All photos come from a single JPEG file, or
    > scanned from a print into
    > JPEG file. I usually create duplicates
    > using Gamma correction in my
    > old Paint shop Pro version 6 (or 7?). I
    > made 2 under exposures
    > (usually with gamma = 25% and 50-60%, and 2
    > over exposures (usually
    > gamma = 190-200% and 360-400%).


    Thanks, this is what I had in mind. I
    photograph buildings and this produced high
    contrast when the sun is shining.
    Normally I wait for an overcast day to get in
    all the detail, but this method might save
    some trouble.

    DxO Optics Pro v4 has some form of
    optimization, but I do not know if they use
    this one.
     
    Peter Jason, Nov 17, 2007
    #6
  7. Peter Jason

    Peter Jason Guest

    "Douglas" <>
    wrote in message
    news:fhlnas$ls8$...
    > On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 18:06:18 +1100, Peter
    > Jason wrote:
    >
    >> I have been going over some of my old
    >> photographs, especially the
    >> contrasty ones, to try and redeem them.
    >>
    >> If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate
    >> two photos from one, one
    >> with the shadows fixed, and one with the
    >> highlights darkened, and then
    >> combine them with Photomatix, then I get
    >> a presentable whole.
    >>
    >> Has anyone used this method too, because
    >> it saves the tedious layering
    >> process in PS.
    >>
    >> Is there some sort of downside?
    >>
    >> PJ

    >
    > I'm not sure what you find about
    > Photoshop's HDR that drives you to
    > Photomatix. You can use HDR in Photoshop
    > with one image. Just develop
    > high and low, save as TIFF files and use
    > them. I frequently do it when I
    > need to recover blown highlights.
    >
    > Douglas


    I have not yet tried the one in PS, but I
    will.
    > --
    > If you don't defend your rights... You end
    > up without any!
     
    Peter Jason, Nov 17, 2007
    #7
  8. Peter Jason

    Douglas Guest

    On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 20:57:42 -0800, The Spider Formally Seated Next To
    Little Miss Muffet wrote:

    > <> wrote in message
    > news:2e5a9b59-451c-4eb1-

    ...
    >> On Nov 16, 1:06 am, "Peter Jason" <> wrote:
    >>> I have been going over some of my old photographs, especially the
    >>> contrasty ones, to try and redeem them.
    >>>
    >>> If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate two photos from one, one
    >>> with the shadows fixed, and one with the highlights darkened, and
    >>> then combine them with Photomatix, then I get a presentable whole.
    >>>
    >>> Has anyone used this method too, because it saves the tedious layering
    >>> process in PS.
    >>>
    >>> Is there some sort of downside?
    >>>
    >>> PJ

    >>
    >> I used photomatix to recover old photos (both digital or scanned
    >> photos) and convert into HDR. Check them at
    >> http://picasaweb.google.com/aniramca/Photomatix_HDR All photos come
    >> from a single JPEG file, or scanned from a print into JPEG file. I
    >> usually create duplicates using Gamma correction in my old Paint shop
    >> Pro version 6 (or 7?). I made 2 under exposures (usually with gamma =
    >> 25% and 50-60%, and 2 over exposures (usually gamma = 190-200% and
    >> 360-400%).

    >
    >
    > Well, those are without a doubt the must ass with terd ugly things I
    > have ever seen.
    >
    > The Spider


    Ha, ha, ha... ROTFL. Art is art no matter where it comes from.
    Do you have no sole, spiderman?



    --
    If you don't defend your rights... You end up without any!
     
    Douglas, Nov 17, 2007
    #8
  9. The Spider Formally Seated Next To Little Miss Muffet wrote:

    >> http://picasaweb.google.com/aniramca/Photomatix_HDR


    >
    > Well, those are without a doubt the must ass with terd ugly things I
    > have ever seen.
    >
    > The Spider
    >


    Quite the troll, Mr. Spider, aren't we ... OOPS, PARDON,
    they really ARE exactly what you say they are ... REALLY BAD!!!
     
    Doug McDonald, Nov 17, 2007
    #9
  10. Douglas wrote:
    > On Fri, 16 Nov 2007 18:06:18 +1100, Peter Jason wrote:
    >
    >> I have been going over some of my old photographs, especially the
    >> contrasty ones, to try and redeem them.
    >>
    >> If I use the PShop CS2 curves and generate two photos from one, one
    >> with the shadows fixed, and one with the highlights darkened, and then
    >> combine them with Photomatix, then I get a presentable whole.
    >>
    >> Has anyone used this method too, because it saves the tedious layering
    >> process in PS.
    >>
    >> Is there some sort of downside?
    >>
    >> PJ

    >
    > I'm not sure what you find about Photoshop's HDR that drives you to
    > Photomatix. You can use HDR in Photoshop with one image. Just develop
    > high and low, save as TIFF files and use them. I frequently do it when I
    > need to recover blown highlights.
    >
    > Douglas
    >
    >
    >


    Even that is not necessary. Just use Photoshop to convert the RAW image
    to a low contrast (say -30) 16 bit Photoshop file, making sure you get the
    whole image into the more or less linear part of the curve. Make sure you have the
    whole high and low parts unclipped. 16 bits is plenty to get any image
    from current cameras, even the newest "claimed 14 bit" Canons, if done right.

    Save the original. Then go to work in Photoshop. Use Noise Ninja on the dark parts.

    Doug McDonald
     
    Doug McDonald, Nov 17, 2007
    #10
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