HDR Photography Anyone ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Bernard Rother, Dec 6, 2007.

  1. Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over
    exposed and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for
    processing. It's not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect
    pic.
    Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of scenes.
    The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.
    Bernard Rother, Dec 6, 2007
    #1
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  2. Bernard Rother

    Paul Furman Guest

    Bernard Rother wrote:
    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    > Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    > take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over
    > exposed and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for
    > processing. It's not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect
    > pic.
    > Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    > scenes.
    > The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.


    You will want to use moderation in the settings or it looks surreal.
    Often better results can be had from manual blending to simulate or
    actually using a graduated neutral density filter. Watch out for halos.
    I think the one I liked was dynamicphoto-HDR. The times I want it is
    when I don't know I want it and then I rely on working from one raw file
    which is OK but not great. For moderate enhancement it's pretty good though.
    Paul Furman, Dec 6, 2007
    #2
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  3. Bernard Rother

    Douglas Guest

    "Bernard Rother" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    > Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    > take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over exposed
    > and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for processing. It's
    > not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect pic.
    > Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    > scenes.
    > The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.


    HDR is only for static objects. Even the high speed DSLR cameras can't take
    4 or 5 identical shots of a moving target. Trying to do it with a person
    requires them to remain perfectly still while you take several (identically
    composed) shots. Just blinking will ruin it.

    So the technology looks promising but the application of it is quite
    limited.

    Douglas
    Douglas, Dec 6, 2007
    #3
  4. On Dec 5, 9:16 pm, Bernard Rother
    <> wrote:
    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    > Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    > take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over
    > exposed and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for
    > processing. It's not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect
    > pic.
    > Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of scenes.
    > The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.


    Tried it after a club presentation on how-to of HDR. It works, but it
    indeed requires special subjects/scenes, and have not had a chance to
    try it on a good scene yet. I just shot a series off of back porch
    that did not have enough scene dynamic range to make a good result.

    One popular use is inside of big cathedrals and churches, where you
    can make the interior shadow detail visible without blowing out
    windows.

    The technique GREATLY reduces contrast- that is the idea- so it does
    create a weird surrealistic look- sort of more like a painting than a
    normal photo.

    It is for static scenes that have inherently a high dynamic range.
    Another example is a backlit subject (not a person- they would have to
    sit too still. Say a sunrise over a lake, where the lit sky and the
    beach/landscape which is very faint can both be visible in the final
    print.
    Don Stauffer in Minnesota, Dec 6, 2007
    #4
  5. Bernard Rother

    bugbear Guest

    Bernard Rother wrote:
    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    > Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    > take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over
    > exposed and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for
    > processing. It's not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect
    > pic.
    > Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    > scenes.
    > The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.


    http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=1969407711&size=l

    Taken with a dirt cheap (and now obselete) Canon a540.

    BugBear
    bugbear, Dec 6, 2007
    #5
  6. Bernard Rother

    Craig Guest

    Bernard Rother wrote:

    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot
    > here ( Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography
    > where you take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up
    > to over exposed and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3
    > for processing. It's not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the
    > perfect pic. Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to
    > certain types of scenes. The couple of photos in the mag looked
    > fantastic.


    Here are a couple of HDR shots I did of the moon:

    http://www.pbase.com/craigbob/image/84712903

    http://www.pbase.com/craigbob/image/84712907

    --
    Craig, Dec 6, 2007
    #6
  7. Bernard Rother

    Toby Guest

    "Bernard Rother" <> schrieb im
    Newsbeitrag news:...
    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    > Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    > take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over exposed
    > and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for processing. It's
    > not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect pic.
    > Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    > scenes.
    > The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.


    As others have said, you have to work with static scenes, since the
    information should not vary from frame to frame. I was recently up on an
    abandoned part of the Great Wall of China, and was shooting from inside one
    of the guard houses. Using HDR to blend five exposures one f stop apart
    (handheld! but it worked with 5 fps) I was able to get a quite natural
    looking result where the bricks on the inside of the (basically completely
    dark) guardhouse were visible and just a couple of stops darker than the
    outside in broad daylight.

    If you are interested have a look here:

    http://www.renderosity.com/mod/gallery/index.php?image_id=1384632

    Toby
    Toby, Dec 7, 2007
    #7
  8. David J Taylor, Dec 7, 2007
    #8
  9. Bernard Rother

    bugbear Guest

    Toby wrote:
    > "Bernard Rother" <> schrieb im
    > Newsbeitrag news:...
    >> Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    >> Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    >> take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over exposed
    >> and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for processing. It's
    >> not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect pic.
    >> Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    >> scenes.
    >> The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.

    >
    > As others have said, you have to work with static scenes, since the
    > information should not vary from frame to frame.


    It's even possible (but hard) to push that limitation, via
    alignment software:

    http://www.luxal.eu/resources/hdr/hdrprep/tutorial.shtml

    BugBear
    bugbear, Dec 7, 2007
    #9
  10. Bernard Rother

    BRH Guest

    Bernard Rother wrote:
    > Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    > Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    > take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over
    > exposed and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for
    > processing. It's not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect
    > pic.
    > Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    > scenes.
    > The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.


    I agree with others that HDR needs to be toned down a bit or else it can
    look cartoonish. Landscape, static scenes can look quite good though,
    if the settings are right:

    http://www.pbase.com/newbert/image/88088960/large

    If you want to try Photomatix, you can download a free trial nad make an
    unlimited number of images. However, the trial version will put
    watermarks all over them.
    BRH, Dec 8, 2007
    #10
  11. Bernard Rother

    Annika1980 Guest

    Annika1980, Dec 8, 2007
    #11
  12. Toby wrote:
    > "Bernard Rother" <> schrieb im
    > Newsbeitrag news:...
    >> Just finished reading a Popular Science mag which a client forgot here (
    >> Nice mag ) There was a very brief article on HDR photography where you
    >> take a series of shots, from under exposed, all the way up to over exposed
    >> and pull them into a program like Photomatix or CS3 for processing. It's
    >> not a case of sandwiching them and out pops the perfect pic.
    >> Has anyone here tried this and is it more suited to certain types of
    >> scenes.
    >> The couple of photos in the mag looked fantastic.

    >
    > As others have said, you have to work with static scenes, since the
    > information should not vary from frame to frame. I was recently up on an
    > abandoned part of the Great Wall of China, and was shooting from inside one
    > of the guard houses. Using HDR to blend five exposures one f stop apart
    > (handheld! but it worked with 5 fps) I was able to get a quite natural
    > looking result where the bricks on the inside of the (basically completely
    > dark) guardhouse were visible and just a couple of stops darker than the
    > outside in broad daylight.
    >
    > If you are interested have a look here:
    >
    > http://www.renderosity.com/mod/gallery/index.php?image_id=1384632
    >
    > Toby
    >
    >

    Thanks guys, the pictures are awesome and certainly an inspiration for
    me. Been overcast here the last couple of days but I find myself looking
    out for suitable subjects. I enjoy B&W, duotones etc and am looking
    forward to taking a HDR file with all that detail and working with it in
    mono.
    Will let you know if I manage anything worthwhile to put up. Thanks
    again for all the advice.

    Bernard.
    Bernard Rother, Dec 8, 2007
    #12
  13. Bernard Rother

    Peter Jason Guest

    "Bernard Rother"
    <> wrote
    in message
    news:...
    > Toby wrote:
    >> "Bernard Rother"
    >> <>
    >> schrieb im Newsbeitrag
    >> news:...
    >>> Just finished reading a Popular Science
    >>> mag which a client forgot here ( Nice
    >>> mag ) There was a very brief article on
    >>> HDR photography where you take a series
    >>> of shots, from under exposed, all the way
    >>> up to over exposed and pull them into a
    >>> program like Photomatix or CS3 for
    >>> processing. It's not a case of
    >>> sandwiching them and out pops the perfect
    >>> pic.
    >>> Has anyone here tried this and is it more
    >>> suited to certain types of scenes.
    >>> The couple of photos in the mag looked
    >>> fantastic.

    >>
    >> As others have said, you have to work with
    >> static scenes, since the information
    >> should not vary from frame to frame. I was
    >> recently up on an abandoned part of the
    >> Great Wall of China, and was shooting from
    >> inside one of the guard houses. Using HDR
    >> to blend five exposures one f stop apart
    >> (handheld! but it worked with 5 fps) I was
    >> able to get a quite natural looking result
    >> where the bricks on the inside of the
    >> (basically completely dark) guardhouse
    >> were visible and just a couple of stops
    >> darker than the outside in broad daylight.
    >>
    >> If you are interested have a look here:
    >>
    >> http://www.renderosity.com/mod/gallery/index.php?image_id=1384632
    >>
    >> Toby

    > Thanks guys, the pictures are awesome and
    > certainly an inspiration for me. Been
    > overcast here the last couple of days but I
    > find myself looking out for suitable
    > subjects. I enjoy B&W, duotones etc and am
    > looking forward to taking a HDR file with
    > all that detail and working with it in
    > mono.
    > Will let you know if I manage anything
    > worthwhile to put up. Thanks again for all
    > the advice.
    >
    > Bernard.


    I have found the wind to be a problem when it
    rustles the leaves, and power lines etc can
    move, and so can the tripod under certain
    circumstances.

    Very few cameras gave an automatic suitable
    5-shot continuous burst with a range of
    plus/minus 3.0EV, or even plus/minus 2.0EV.
    This would be most desirable for rapid
    accurate work. Manual adjustment of the F
    stops tend to be tedious and can let errors
    (movement) creep in. Holding the mirror up
    while the burst is in progress could only be
    an advantage.

    It's outrageous that camera manufacturers
    will not supply software upgrades to give
    this simple enhancement.

    PJ
    Peter Jason, Dec 12, 2007
    #13
  14. Bernard Rother

    Marcin Guest

    Marcin, Dec 12, 2007
    #14
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