HDR images in PS CS2

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ronviers@gmail.com, Jun 24, 2006.

  1. Guest

    I have been reading about the HDR (High Dynamic Range) capabilities of
    Photoshop CS2. Apparently this allows a photographer to capture a
    scene with such detail that an encyclopedic like file from which any
    number of high resolution images can be pulled out and used. This
    feature seems interesting, even compelling, but to me begs the
    questioin - What's it for? Would anyone care to speculate as to how
    HDR can be used and what potential they see for it?

    Thanks,
    Ron
    , Jun 24, 2006
    #1
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  2. Guest

    wrote:
    > I have been reading about the HDR (High Dynamic Range) capabilities of
    > Photoshop CS2. Apparently this allows a photographer to capture a
    > scene with such detail that an encyclopedic like file from which any
    > number of high resolution images can be pulled out and used. This
    > feature seems interesting, even compelling, but to me begs the
    > questioin - What's it for? Would anyone care to speculate as to how
    > HDR can be used and what potential they see for it?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Ron


    Try this link.

    http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml

    In simple terms, it is used for combining two or more differently
    exposed images of the same scene, to produce one image with
    significantly better dynamic range. The result will have detail in
    areas that would normally be blown out (highlights) or blocked (lost
    shadow detail).

    Which doesn't really sound like your interpretation, but maybe I am
    misreading it.
    , Jun 24, 2006
    #2
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  3. Guest

    wrote:
    > wrote:
    > > I have been reading about the HDR (High Dynamic Range) capabilities of
    > > Photoshop CS2. Apparently this allows a photographer to capture a
    > > scene with such detail that an encyclopedic like file from which any
    > > number of high resolution images can be pulled out and used. This
    > > feature seems interesting, even compelling, but to me begs the
    > > questioin - What's it for? Would anyone care to speculate as to how
    > > HDR can be used and what potential they see for it?
    > >
    > > Thanks,
    > > Ron

    >
    > Try this link.
    >
    > http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml
    >
    > In simple terms, it is used for combining two or more differently
    > exposed images of the same scene, to produce one image with
    > significantly better dynamic range. The result will have detail in
    > areas that would normally be blown out (highlights) or blocked (lost
    > shadow detail).
    >
    > Which doesn't really sound like your interpretation, but maybe I am
    > misreading it.


    I see. I was imagining some kind of superpicture. Oh well.

    Thanks for the replyand link,
    Ron
    , Jun 24, 2006
    #3
  4. Pete D Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > wrote:
    >> wrote:
    >> > I have been reading about the HDR (High Dynamic Range) capabilities of
    >> > Photoshop CS2. Apparently this allows a photographer to capture a
    >> > scene with such detail that an encyclopedic like file from which any
    >> > number of high resolution images can be pulled out and used. This
    >> > feature seems interesting, even compelling, but to me begs the
    >> > questioin - What's it for? Would anyone care to speculate as to how
    >> > HDR can be used and what potential they see for it?
    >> >
    >> > Thanks,
    >> > Ron

    >>
    >> Try this link.
    >>
    >> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml
    >>
    >> In simple terms, it is used for combining two or more differently
    >> exposed images of the same scene, to produce one image with
    >> significantly better dynamic range. The result will have detail in
    >> areas that would normally be blown out (highlights) or blocked (lost
    >> shadow detail).
    >>
    >> Which doesn't really sound like your interpretation, but maybe I am
    >> misreading it.

    >
    > I see. I was imagining some kind of superpicture. Oh well.
    >
    > Thanks for the replyand link,
    > Ron


    Weel if you do it right is can almost be a superpicutre, some results are
    simply stunning.
    Pete D, Jun 25, 2006
    #4
  5. Guest

    Pete D wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > >
    > > wrote:
    > >> wrote:
    > >> > I have been reading about the HDR (High Dynamic Range) capabilities of
    > >> > Photoshop CS2. Apparently this allows a photographer to capture a
    > >> > scene with such detail that an encyclopedic like file from which any
    > >> > number of high resolution images can be pulled out and used. This
    > >> > feature seems interesting, even compelling, but to me begs the
    > >> > questioin - What's it for? Would anyone care to speculate as to how
    > >> > HDR can be used and what potential they see for it?
    > >> >
    > >> > Thanks,
    > >> > Ron
    > >>
    > >> Try this link.
    > >>
    > >> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml
    > >>
    > >> In simple terms, it is used for combining two or more differently
    > >> exposed images of the same scene, to produce one image with
    > >> significantly better dynamic range. The result will have detail in
    > >> areas that would normally be blown out (highlights) or blocked (lost
    > >> shadow detail).
    > >>
    > >> Which doesn't really sound like your interpretation, but maybe I am
    > >> misreading it.

    > >
    > > I see. I was imagining some kind of superpicture. Oh well.
    > >
    > > Thanks for the replyand link,
    > > Ron

    >
    > Weel if you do it right is can almost be a superpicutre, some results are
    > simply stunning.


    I was hoping for one you could blow up to the size of a football field
    then examine with a microscope. A few yottabytes should do the trick.
    But then I would want to view it on a monitor that required sunglasses
    and a night vision visor to view. Guess I will have to wait for CS3
    , Jun 25, 2006
    #5
  6. Pete D Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Pete D wrote:
    >> <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> >
    >> > wrote:
    >> >> wrote:
    >> >> > I have been reading about the HDR (High Dynamic Range) capabilities
    >> >> > of
    >> >> > Photoshop CS2. Apparently this allows a photographer to capture a
    >> >> > scene with such detail that an encyclopedic like file from which any
    >> >> > number of high resolution images can be pulled out and used. This
    >> >> > feature seems interesting, even compelling, but to me begs the
    >> >> > questioin - What's it for? Would anyone care to speculate as to how
    >> >> > HDR can be used and what potential they see for it?
    >> >> >
    >> >> > Thanks,
    >> >> > Ron
    >> >>
    >> >> Try this link.
    >> >>
    >> >> http://www.luminous-landscape.com/tutorials/hdr.shtml
    >> >>
    >> >> In simple terms, it is used for combining two or more differently
    >> >> exposed images of the same scene, to produce one image with
    >> >> significantly better dynamic range. The result will have detail in
    >> >> areas that would normally be blown out (highlights) or blocked (lost
    >> >> shadow detail).
    >> >>
    >> >> Which doesn't really sound like your interpretation, but maybe I am
    >> >> misreading it.
    >> >
    >> > I see. I was imagining some kind of superpicture. Oh well.
    >> >
    >> > Thanks for the replyand link,
    >> > Ron

    >>
    >> Weel if you do it right is can almost be a superpicutre, some results are
    >> simply stunning.

    >
    > I was hoping for one you could blow up to the size of a football field
    > then examine with a microscope. A few yottabytes should do the trick.
    > But then I would want to view it on a monitor that required sunglasses
    > and a night vision visor to view. Guess I will have to wait for CS3
    >


    Sorry thats not what HDR is all about. Generally it is about hugely
    extending the dynamic range using the best bits from several shots.

    There was a good demo that I saw with some ships that used three shots where
    the sky the ships and then the water were merged from the three shots,
    stunning result.
    Pete D, Jun 25, 2006
    #6
  7. wrote:

    > I was hoping for one you could blow up to the size of a football field
    > then examine with a microscope. A few yottabytes should do the trick.
    > But then I would want to view it on a monitor that required sunglasses
    > and a night vision visor to view. Guess I will have to wait for CS3


    Such imaging is being done. There are two ways to do it:
    large format film, or digital mosaics. There is software,
    like PTGui, that will stitch multiple images together into
    one large image. It enables you to obtain very high resolution
    images. Scott Wilson in this newsgroup has several
    examples on his web site, e.g.
    http://www.sewcon.com/temp/High dof.jpg

    Perhaps Scott can chime in with links to more recent stuff.

    My site has large format images: http://www.clarkvision.com

    I've been traveling the last two months without my 4x5, doing
    digital mosaics. Over the next month I hope to get some
    examples up on my web site.

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Jun 25, 2006
    #7
  8. Guest

    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    > wrote:
    >
    > > I was hoping for one you could blow up to the size of a football field
    > > then examine with a microscope. A few yottabytes should do the trick.
    > > But then I would want to view it on a monitor that required sunglasses
    > > and a night vision visor to view. Guess I will have to wait for CS3

    >
    > Such imaging is being done. There are two ways to do it:
    > large format film, or digital mosaics. There is software,
    > like PTGui, that will stitch multiple images together into
    > one large image. It enables you to obtain very high resolution
    > images. Scott Wilson in this newsgroup has several
    > examples on his web site, e.g.
    > http://www.sewcon.com/temp/High dof.jpg
    >
    > Perhaps Scott can chime in with links to more recent stuff.
    >
    > My site has large format images: http://www.clarkvision.com
    >
    > I've been traveling the last two months without my 4x5, doing
    > digital mosaics. Over the next month I hope to get some
    > examples up on my web site.
    >
    > Roger


    Hi Roger,
    I have been looking at your galleries. You have some fantastic work. I
    have read through some of your posts in the group archive you are
    amazingly knowledgeable, maybe the Ansel Adams of our day. It is a
    privilege for me to be in the same group. So maybe before I get thrown
    out or get pissed off and leave, maybe you could comment on the
    following topics.

    Do you see a way of introducing some kind of temporal linearity into a
    single image. That may seem like defeating the idea of a photograph
    but I am talking about something just beyond a photograph but before
    animation.

    Have you done any work in Bullet-time?
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullet_time Where do you see it going?
    Is it too gimmicky for you?

    Do you have scenes in mind that seem to dictate, or at least lend
    themselves to, the expanded/extended range offered by the lateral and
    longitudinal stitching you have been doing? The mowed grass of a yard
    opening into mountains just does not do it for me.

    What do you think would be some cool new features for display devices
    of the future to have?

    Best regards,
    Ron
    , Jun 26, 2006
    #8
  9. wrote:

    > Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    >
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I was hoping for one you could blow up to the size of a football field
    >>>then examine with a microscope. A few yottabytes should do the trick.
    >>>But then I would want to view it on a monitor that required sunglasses
    >>>and a night vision visor to view. Guess I will have to wait for CS3

    >>
    >>Such imaging is being done. There are two ways to do it:
    >>large format film, or digital mosaics. There is software,
    >>like PTGui, that will stitch multiple images together into
    >>one large image. It enables you to obtain very high resolution
    >>images. Scott Wilson in this newsgroup has several
    >>examples on his web site, e.g.
    >>http://www.sewcon.com/temp/High dof.jpg
    >>
    >>Perhaps Scott can chime in with links to more recent stuff.
    >>
    >>My site has large format images: http://www.clarkvision.com
    >>
    >>I've been traveling the last two months without my 4x5, doing
    >>digital mosaics. Over the next month I hope to get some
    >>examples up on my web site.
    >>
    >>Roger

    >
    >
    > Hi Roger,
    > I have been looking at your galleries. You have some fantastic work. I
    > have read through some of your posts in the group archive you are
    > amazingly knowledgeable, maybe the Ansel Adams of our day. It is a
    > privilege for me to be in the same group.


    Ron,
    Thank you for the compliments. There are many many very good
    photographers, and many far better than I, and many in this newsgroup.

    > So maybe before I get thrown
    > out or get pissed off and leave, maybe you could comment on the
    > following topics.
    >
    > Do you see a way of introducing some kind of temporal linearity into a
    > single image. That may seem like defeating the idea of a photograph
    > but I am talking about something just beyond a photograph but before
    > animation.


    I'm not sure what you have in mind here, but here are some ideas
    I've had. There are LCD "picture frames" coming out now.
    They are still small, but that will grow with time. You download
    your images and the LCD will then flip through them at some
    given rate. So your walls can have hundreds of pictures in
    one spot. This leads to some interesting possibilities, like
    the view of a scene over a day, or a year. How about the phases of
    the moon? It could be like a slide show with one frame merging
    with the next. This can illustrate both fast and slow events (like
    your bullet-time, below). Of course, you need not use time
    as part of the output, but simply show the time change spatially,
    as in this image:
    http://www.clarkvision.com/galleries/gallery.bird/web/c12.19.2002.crane.takeoff.sequence.b-1100.html


    > Have you done any work in Bullet-time?
    > http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bullet_time Where do you see it going?
    > Is it too gimmicky for you?


    No, I have not done any bullet time. I tend to think
    in long term subjects, like changes over a season. I have the phases
    of Venus that I'll to put together when I have time.

    > Do you have scenes in mind that seem to dictate, or at least lend
    > themselves to, the expanded/extended range offered by the lateral and
    > longitudinal stitching you have been doing? The mowed grass of a yard
    > opening into mountains just does not do it for me.


    There are many applications of large format photography. Seeing a
    4 x 5 foot (and larger) image that you can walk up to close
    and still be sharp is very stunning. The traditional large format
    photography uses small apertures (like f/45) and long exposure
    times (2 or more seconds). This means you can only work on
    very calm days. Digital mosaicking opens up new possibilities.
    Exposure times can be 1/100 second/frame, thus freezing action.

    > What do you think would be some cool new features for display devices
    > of the future to have?


    Once the price of an LCD "picture frame" becomes similar to the price
    of a matted and framed print, you'll have whole new possibilities,
    much like a computer screen of today, including zooming in, and time
    sequences.

    A 30 x 40 inch framed print on archival paper (e.g. like Fuji
    Crystal Archive) costs a few hundred dollars. If I could get
    a ~ 30 x 40 inch high definition LCD picture frame for say, $1000,
    I would get one and try it out.

    Roger
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Jun 27, 2006
    #9
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