HD Inputs (1080i/576P)** when connected to a HD Digital receiver ?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by OCZ Guy, Jul 6, 2004.

  1. OCZ Guy

    OCZ Guy Guest

    Just a question about DVD picture quality.

    What would a normal DVD be 576,1080 ect ?

    And if you have a normal TV versus a TV with a STB standard def would
    their be a difference in DVD picture quality, and if you have a HIDEF
    box better picture even again ?

    Just confused ?


    If you know what iam talking about let me know :)

    Thanks.
     
    OCZ Guy, Jul 6, 2004
    #1
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  2. OCZ Guy

    OCZ Guy Guest

    And f the TV suports 576,1080 does it need a STB to view DVDS in that
    detail, but need the box to view TV ?

    totaly confused here.
     
    OCZ Guy, Jul 6, 2004
    #2
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  3. OCZ Guy

    What The! Guest

    Normal DVD players would be 576i, or 576p for progressive (generally)
    Haveing a High Def box makes no difference to DVD quality.
    Having a player that will upscale the output is kind of pointless but there
    are ones around that do it, none that come to mind.

    "OCZ Guy" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Just a question about DVD picture quality.
    >
    > What would a normal DVD be 576,1080 ect ?
    >
    > And if you have a normal TV versus a TV with a STB standard def would
    > their be a difference in DVD picture quality, and if you have a HIDEF
    > box better picture even again ?
    >
    > Just confused ?
    >
    >
    > If you know what iam talking about let me know :)
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
     
    What The!, Jul 6, 2004
    #3
  4. OCZ Guy

    Mark Jones Guest

    "What The!" <> wrote in message
    news:geFGc.81755$...
    > Normal DVD players would be 576i, or 576p for progressive (generally)
    > Haveing a High Def box makes no difference to DVD quality.
    > Having a player that will upscale the output is kind of pointless but

    there
    > are ones around that do it, none that come to mind.

    The quality of the decoding system in an HDTV can improve the
    image quality over a standard analog TV and the quality of the
    DVD player can actually make a visible difference.

    My HDTV has a built-in line-doubler that improves the quality
    of DVD images and my DVD player has a processor that is
    fast enough to generate a cleaner signal than what I get
    with my older DVD players.
     
    Mark Jones, Jul 7, 2004
    #4
  5. OCZ Guy

    Biz Guest

    DVD is at most 720x480 NTSC or 720x576PAL and it can be as low as
    352x240NTSC. Some HDTV's will upconvert the signals....so a normal dvd would
    be 480NTSC/576PAL
    "OCZ Guy" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > Just a question about DVD picture quality.
    >
    > What would a normal DVD be 576,1080 ect ?
    >
    > And if you have a normal TV versus a TV with a STB standard def would
    > their be a difference in DVD picture quality, and if you have a HIDEF
    > box better picture even again ?
    >
    > Just confused ?
    >
    >
    > If you know what iam talking about let me know :)
    >
    > Thanks.
    >
     
    Biz, Jul 7, 2004
    #5
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