HD-DVD and DRM

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Allan, Jul 25, 2005.

  1. Allan

    Allan Guest

    http://p2pnet.net/story/5679

    p2pnet.net News View:- “Last week I wrote about the antitrust issues
    raised by the use of encryption to ‘protect, content,” says professor
    Ed Felten in his Freedom to Tinker blog.

    Here, he gives a concrete example.

    Read on >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>

    HD-DVD Requires Digital Imprimatur
    By Edward Felten - Freedom to Tinker

    HD-DVD, one of the two candidates for the next-gen DVD format, uses a
    “content protection” technology called AACS. And AACS, it turns out,
    requires a digital imprimatur on any content before it can be
    published.

    (The imprimatur — the term is Latin for “let it be printed” — was an
    early technology of censorship. The original imprimatur was a stamp of
    approval granted by a Catholic bishop to certify that a work was free
    from doctrinal or moral error. In some times and places, it was
    illegal to print a work that didn’t have an imprimatur. Today, the
    term refers to any system in which a central entity must approve works
    before they can be published.)

    The technical details are in the AACS Pre-recorded Video Book
    Specification. The digital imprimatur is called a “content
    certificate” (see p. 5 for overview), and is created “at a secure
    facility operated by [the AACS organization]” (p. 8 ). It is forbidden
    to publish any work without an imprimatur, and player devices are
    forbidden to play any work that lacks an imprimatur.

    Like the original imprimatur, the AACS one can be revoked
    retroactively. AACS calls this “content revocation”. Every disc that
    is manufactured is required to carry an up-to-date list of revoked
    works. Player devices are required to keep track of which works have
    been revoked, and to refuse to play revoked works.

    The AACS documents avoid giving a rationale for this feature. The
    closest they come to a rationale is a statement that the system was
    designed so that “[c]ompliant players can authenticate that content
    came from an authorized, licensed replicator” (p. 1). But the system
    as described does not seem designed for that goal — if it were, the
    disc would be signed (and the signature possibly revoked) by the
    replicator, not by the central AACS organization. Also, the actual
    design replaces “can authenticate” by “must authenticate, and must
    refuse to play if authentication fails”.

    The goal of HD-DVD is to become the dominant format for release of
    movies. If this happens, the HD-DVD/AACS imprimatur will be ripe for
    anticompetitive abuses. Who will decide when the imprimatur will be
    used, and how? Apparently it will be the AACS organization. We don’t
    know how that organization is run, but we know that its founding
    members are Disney, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Panasonic, Sony, Toshiba,
    and Warner Brothers. A briefing on the AACS site explains the “AACS
    Structure” by listing the founders.

    I hope the antitrust authorities are watching this very closely. I
    hope, too, that consumers are watching and will vote with their
    dollars against this kind of system.






    "Arguing with anonymous strangers on the Internet is a sucker's game
    because they almost always turn out to be -- or to be indistinguishable from
    -- self-righteous sixteen-year-olds possessing infinite amounts of free time."
    - Neil Stephenson, _Cryptonomicon_
     
    Allan, Jul 25, 2005
    #1
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  2. Allan

    WinField Guest

    I haven't been able to get this notion out of my head :

    - the upcoming new HD_movie format(s) will see some SERIES efforts
    by the movie moguls to eliminate copying\sharing by the little people

    - i think these lock-down measures will initially succeed (which
    will bring joy into the blind hearts of the hysterical TWATS in here
    that absurdly compare copying/sharing movies to stealing TV's, cars et. al.)

    This will dramatically delay the Joe-six_pack market penetration of
    Hi-Definition movies. But just think what happiness will resound in
    Hysterical-Twat-Town!

    So be it. I'm guessing the movie studios won't mind - if you really
    want that HD movie then buy it. You just bought that new HD-TV? Sucka,
    you gonna pay thru the nose to enjoy the new format in all it's glory.

    Regular DVD rentals/sales will continue to make new-kid HD format look
    like a sick puppy.

    just rambling
    the future is not ours to see
    - winf





    Allan wrote:
    > http://p2pnet.net/story/5679
    >
    > p2pnet.net News View:- “Last week I wrote about the antitrust issues
    > raised by the use of encryption to ‘protect, content,” says professor
    > Ed Felten in his Freedom to Tinker blog.
    >
    > Here, he gives a concrete example.
    >
    > Read on >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>
    >
    > HD-DVD Requires Digital Imprimatur
    > By Edward Felten - Freedom to Tinker
    >
    > HD-DVD, one of the two candidates for the next-gen DVD format, uses a
    > “content protection” technology called AACS. And AACS, it turns out,
    > requires a digital imprimatur on any content before it can be
    > published.
    >
    > (The imprimatur — the term is Latin for “let it be printed” — was an
    > early technology of censorship. The original imprimatur was a stamp of
    > approval granted by a Catholic bishop to certify that a work was free
    > from doctrinal or moral error. In some times and places, it was
    > illegal to print a work that didn’t have an imprimatur. Today, the
    > term refers to any system in which a central entity must approve works
    > before they can be published.)
    >
     
    WinField, Jul 25, 2005
    #2
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  3. Allan

    Pat Guest

    WinField wrote:
    > I haven't been able to get this notion out of my head :
    >
    > - the upcoming new HD_movie format(s) will see some SERIES efforts by
    > the movie moguls to eliminate copying\sharing by the little people
    >
    > - i think these lock-down measures will initially succeed (which will
    > bring joy into the blind hearts of the hysterical TWATS in here that
    > absurdly compare copying/sharing movies to stealing TV's, cars et. al.)
    >


    My gut feeling is that we'll see a repeat of what happened with DVD. I
    might be wrong, but I think it took about 2 years for someone to "break"
    the DVD encryption schemes. This was in 1999 or so, and at the time,
    copying DVDs was still unpractical. DVD burners, if they were even on
    the market yet, were priced way too high for most users, and media was
    hard to come by.

    By the time HD-DVD-r technology becomes reliable and burners become
    available at a cheap price, I think there will be workarounds. This
    "imprimatur" technology sounds too impractical to work, and I'm sure
    there will be imprimatur-free players available, just like there are
    region-free players available now.
     
    Pat, Jul 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Allan

    WinField Guest

    Pat wrote:
    > WinField wrote:
    >
    >> I haven't been able to get this notion out of my head :
    >>
    >> - the upcoming new HD_movie format(s) will see some SERIES efforts
    >> by the movie moguls to eliminate copying\sharing by the little people
    >>
    >> - i think these lock-down measures will initially succeed (which
    >> will bring joy into the blind hearts of the hysterical TWATS in here
    >> that absurdly compare copying/sharing movies to stealing TV's, cars
    >> et. al.)
    >>

    >
    > My gut feeling is that we'll see a repeat of what happened with DVD. I
    > might be wrong, but I think it took about 2 years for someone to "break"
    > the DVD encryption schemes. This was in 1999 or so, and at the time,
    > copying DVDs was still unpractical. DVD burners, if they were even on
    > the market yet, were priced way too high for most users, and media was
    > hard to come by.
    >
    > By the time HD-DVD-r technology becomes reliable and burners become
    > available at a cheap price, I think there will be workarounds. This
    > "imprimatur" technology sounds too impractical to work, and I'm sure
    > there will be imprimatur-free players available, just like there are
    > region-free players available now.



    I think there's a very good chance HiDef-DVD things will fall into place
    as you describe, Pat.

    Can the movie studios force the hardware manufacturers to install
    satellite cards/phone jacks to authenticate that each playback of a
    HD-dvd is kosher? This wouldn't go over well with me.

    Also as mentioned by another poster, there will be a natural barrier to
    swapping HD movies - SIZE. Downloading 11-30 gigs just for one flick
    would require a lot of time. For ripping, processing even more harddisk
    space and CPU time as well (format conversion).

    looking forward to see what I can see,
    winfield
     
    WinField, Jul 28, 2005
    #4
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