Hassles in sports arenas?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Andrew McDonald, Dec 4, 2003.

  1. I recently purchased a 70-200 f2.8 lens. It first use will be at a
    figure skating show in St. Louis at the Savvis Center in January.

    The last time I went to one of these (a few years ago) I was asked if my
    camera was "professional". At the time I was using a Minolta 700si with
    a 135mm f2.8 lens. I told them no and they let me in.

    However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm lens
    was. Will I have any problems?

    The ticket says "No Flash Photo/No Video" so I should be protected by
    that if they want to hassle me, right? Is there anything I can do to
    avoid or minimize problems upon entry?
    Andrew McDonald, Dec 4, 2003
    #1
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  2. Andrew McDonald

    Robertwgross Guest

    Andrew wrote:
    >I recently purchased a 70-200 f2.8 lens. It first use will be at a
    >figure skating show in St. Louis at the Savvis Center in January.
    >
    >The last time I went to one of these (a few years ago) I was asked if my
    >camera was "professional". At the time I was using a Minolta 700si with
    >a 135mm f2.8 lens. I told them no and they let me in.
    >
    >However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm lens
    >was. Will I have any problems?
    >
    >The ticket says "No Flash Photo/No Video" so I should be protected by
    >that if they want to hassle me, right? Is there anything I can do to
    >avoid or minimize problems upon entry?


    Stick some short lens on the camera body, and then keep the long lens inside
    your coat until you need it.

    ---Bob Gross---
    Robertwgross, Dec 4, 2003
    #2
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  3. Andrew McDonald

    Ed E. Guest

    > However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm lens
    > was. Will I have any problems?


    More and more indoor events in the States are prohibiting cameras of any
    type. You can thank Clear Channel Entertainment for much of the
    restrictions, as they claim copyrights to all of their managed events (more
    than you might think.) I was told to either take my camera back to the car
    or check it in at the security desk, but I wasn't taking it inside. Even
    with media credentials, I was threatened with a lawsuit if I continued to
    offer any of the pictures for sale that I took. I haven't been to a CCE
    sponsored event since.

    Best bet is to ask the security department of the facility you're planning
    on going to BEFORE you get there.
    Ed E., Dec 4, 2003
    #3
  4. Andrew McDonald

    Alan Browne Guest

    Andrew McDonald wrote:

    > I recently purchased a 70-200 f2.8 lens. It first use will be at a
    > figure skating show in St. Louis at the Savvis Center in January.
    >
    > The last time I went to one of these (a few years ago) I was asked if my
    > camera was "professional". At the time I was using a Minolta 700si with
    > a 135mm f2.8 lens. I told them no and they let me in.


    Assuming you still have a Minolta just say, "nah, pros use Nikons" while
    shaking your head shyly.

    >
    > However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm lens
    > was. Will I have any problems?


    Yes, esp. if it is white. If they are doing a bag search, put it in a
    sweater or something at the bottom of the bag and put a cheap 28-80 or
    50mm on the camera body until you're seated for 10 min. or so. Just
    hope they don't dig for booze.

    >
    > The ticket says "No Flash Photo/No Video" so I should be protected by
    > that if they want to hassle me, right? Is there anything I can do to
    > avoid or minimize problems upon entry?


    Leave the flash at home.

    Good luck. They've turned into real a-holes over the past few years.

    Have a backup plan, eg, what happens if they don't let you in...will
    your car be too far away to go back and lock it up? Do they have a
    secure cloakroom for you to leave it in.

    --
    e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, Dec 4, 2003
    #4
  5. Alan Browne wrote:
    > Yes, esp. if it is white. If they are doing a bag search, put it in a
    > sweater or something at the bottom of the bag and put a cheap 28-80 or
    > 50mm on the camera body until you're seated for 10 min. or so. Just
    > hope they don't dig for booze.


    No, I got the black one.

    I did a little more research, found this answer at www.starsonice.com.
    So it might depend on how "knowledgable" the gate attendants are.

    ---
    Q: What is the policy for bringing cameras to the show?

    A: No flash photography or videotaping is allowed during the
    performance. Non-flash cameras with lenses less than 70mm are permitted.
    ---

    > Leave the flash at home.


    Of course.

    > Have a backup plan, eg, what happens if they don't let you in...will
    > your car be too far away to go back and lock it up? Do they have a
    > secure cloakroom for you to leave it in.


    Good idea. I was probably going to walk from the hotel so I will have
    to make sure I have time to run back if necessary. I am not going to
    leave $3500 worth of camera/lens anywhere.
    Andrew McDonald, Dec 4, 2003
    #5
  6. Cameras are not professional, users are. If you are not selling your
    photos, you are not a professional and your equipment is not professional.

    A Kodak Instamatic is a professional camera when used by a professional.

    The fact is many events are prohibiting all cameras for a couple of
    reasons. The first is the safety and undisturbed enjoyment of the general
    audience. Many people, myself included don't care for some bozo who wants
    to get in my way during an event because he has a camera and thinks that
    gives him special privileges.

    Another reason is often legal agreements limiting photographs.

    --
    Joseph E. Meehan

    26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math


    "Andrew McDonald" <> wrote in message
    news:ETLzb.28318$...
    > I recently purchased a 70-200 f2.8 lens. It first use will be at a
    > figure skating show in St. Louis at the Savvis Center in January.
    >
    > The last time I went to one of these (a few years ago) I was asked if my
    > camera was "professional". At the time I was using a Minolta 700si with
    > a 135mm f2.8 lens. I told them no and they let me in.
    >
    > However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm lens
    > was. Will I have any problems?
    >
    > The ticket says "No Flash Photo/No Video" so I should be protected by
    > that if they want to hassle me, right? Is there anything I can do to
    > avoid or minimize problems upon entry?
    >
    Joseph Meehan, Dec 4, 2003
    #6
  7. Andrew McDonald

    Rick Guest

    "Joseph Meehan" <> wrote in message news:HvNzb.20$%...
    > Cameras are not professional, users are. If you are not selling your
    > photos, you are not a professional and your equipment is not professional.
    >
    > A Kodak Instamatic is a professional camera when used by a professional.
    >
    > The fact is many events are prohibiting all cameras for a couple of
    > reasons. The first is the safety and undisturbed enjoyment of the general
    > audience. Many people, myself included don't care for some bozo who wants
    > to get in my way during an event because he has a camera and thinks that
    > gives him special privileges.
    >
    > Another reason is often legal agreements limiting photographs.


    Whatever. Between the fans, concession vendors constantly
    walking up and down the aisles, etc etc, photographers are
    about the only group that hasn't gotten in my way at sporting
    events.

    Rick
    Rick, Dec 4, 2003
    #7
  8. Andrew McDonald

    CARBUFF Guest

    >Stick some short lens on the camera body, and then keep the long lens inside
    >your coat until you need it.
    >
    >---Bob Gross---


    Right and if they ask you if thats a long lens in your pocket, just tell em no,
    youre just happy to see them.

    George
    CARBUFF, Dec 4, 2003
    #8
  9. Ed E. wrote in part:


    > More and more indoor events in the States are prohibiting cameras of any
    > type. You can thank Clear Channel Entertainment for much of the
    > restrictions, as they claim copyrights to all of their managed events (more
    > than you might think.)



    Why do you hate America so much, bub? You must be one of them dixiechick
    sympathizers. Go over to your buddies in i-RAN or North Koreea and see
    how many pictures you get to take. Meanwhile, as good consumers we'll be
    enjoying this new show called...

    Clear Channel Entertainment Presents...

    THE SKY! Look at all the stars and planets! See meteors! Special guests
    the SUN and the MOON!

    THE SKY(TM) is a CCE production. All rights reserved. Please observe
    only officially recognized constellations. No cameras or any video
    recording devices allowed without prior authorization. Certain areas of
    THE SKY(TM) may not be photographed or looked at due to homeland
    security considerations. No refunds. No food or drink allowed under THE
    SKY(TM). Thank you for your mindless obedience. Enjoy!

    --
    It Came From C. L. Smith's Unclaimed Mysteries.
    http://www.unclaimedmysteries.net
    Unclaimed Mysteries, Dec 4, 2003
    #9
  10. Andrew McDonald

    Ben Thomas Guest

    Alan Browne wrote:
    >
    >
    > Andrew McDonald wrote:
    >
    >> I recently purchased a 70-200 f2.8 lens. It first use will be at a
    >> figure skating show in St. Louis at the Savvis Center in January.
    >>
    >> The last time I went to one of these (a few years ago) I was asked if
    >> my camera was "professional". At the time I was using a Minolta 700si
    >> with a 135mm f2.8 lens. I told them no and they let me in.

    >
    >
    > Assuming you still have a Minolta just say, "nah, pros use Nikons" while
    > shaking your head shyly.
    >
    >>
    >> However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm lens
    >> was. Will I have any problems?

    >
    >
    > Yes, esp. if it is white. If they are doing a bag search, put it in a
    > sweater or something at the bottom of the bag and put a cheap 28-80 or
    > 50mm on the camera body until you're seated for 10 min. or so. Just
    > hope they don't dig for booze.


    What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's legal
    in the USA.


    --
    --
    Ben Thomas - Software Engineer - UNICO Computer Systems
    Melbourne, Australia

    Opinions, conclusions, and other information in this message that do not
    relate to the official business of my employer, UNICO Computer Systems,
    shall be understood as neither given nor endorsed by it.
    Ben Thomas, Dec 4, 2003
    #10
  11. Andrew McDonald

    Rick Guest

    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message news:prfoqb.1ue.ln@192.168.11.2...
    > What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    > Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's legal
    > in the USA.


    Americans have been bending over like sheeple ever since
    9/11/01. We're even forced to listen to "God Bless America"
    now during baseball games, as if they're fucking revival meetings.
    And try flying into one of our airports these days, it's something
    straight out of a George Orwell novel.

    Bin Laden was right -- we really are a paper tiger. Pathetic,
    spineless corporate prostitutes, the lot of us.

    Rick
    Rick, Dec 4, 2003
    #11
  12. Ben Thomas wrote:

    > ...
    > What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    > Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if
    > it's legal in the USA.


    You can always decide not to enter the piece of private property they're
    guarding -- or, you can opt to jump through the hoops to enter. Now,
    if they walk up to you on the street and want to have a look ...
    Anthony Buckland, Dec 5, 2003
    #12
  13. "Ed E." <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > > However, my 70-200mm lens is a bit more imposing than the 135mm

    lens
    > > was. Will I have any problems?

    >
    > More and more indoor events in the States are prohibiting cameras of

    any
    > type. You can thank Clear Channel Entertainment for much of the
    > restrictions, as they claim copyrights to all of their managed

    events (more
    > than you might think.) I was told to either take my camera back to

    the car
    > or check it in at the security desk, but I wasn't taking it inside.

    Even
    > with media credentials, I was threatened with a lawsuit if I

    continued to
    > offer any of the pictures for sale that I took. I haven't been to a

    CCE
    > sponsored event since.
    >
    > Best bet is to ask the security department of the facility you're

    planning
    > on going to BEFORE you get there.
    >


    I find it more and more difficult to take photos at sporting and other
    events. I went to an Ian Hunter concert in a popular Manhattan venue
    two years ago. I was forced to check my camera at the door unless I
    was willing to pay the promoter an "origination" fee in order to take
    pictures. Even the artist's webmaster was not allowed to take
    pictures for the artist's website without paying the fee.
    Peter A. Stavrakoglou, Dec 5, 2003
    #13
  14. Andrew McDonald

    Tom Guest

    "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    news:prfoqb.1ue.ln@192.168.11.2...
    > > Yes, esp. if it is white. If they are doing a bag search, put it in a
    > > sweater or something at the bottom of the bag and put a cheap 28-80 or
    > > 50mm on the camera body until you're seated for 10 min. or so. Just
    > > hope they don't dig for booze.

    >
    > What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    > Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's

    legal
    > in the USA.



    Come now Ben, half my family are Aussies and I can damn well assure you that
    intrusive searches ARE a part of Australian daily life. Practically every
    major store will search bags upon exit, even if you are walking directly out
    after leaving the checkout cue. Many will insist upon a looksee when
    entering also.

    This cannot be restricted to WA only (my family lives in Mandurah).

    Tom
    Tom, Dec 5, 2003
    #14
  15. Andrew McDonald

    Charlie C. Guest

    "Rick" <> wrote in
    news:bqogcg$24l51v$-berlin.de:

    > "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message
    > news:prfoqb.1ue.ln@192.168.11.2...
    >> What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    >> Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if
    >> it's legal in the USA.

    >
    > Americans have been bending over like sheeple ever since
    > 9/11/01. We're even forced to listen to "God Bless America"
    > now during baseball games, as if they're fucking revival meetings.
    > And try flying into one of our airports these days, it's something
    > straight out of a George Orwell novel.
    >
    > Bin Laden was right -- we really are a paper tiger. Pathetic,
    > spineless corporate prostitutes, the lot of us.
    >
    > Rick
    >
    >


    They've been searching bags at sporting events and concerts here in Houston
    for YEARS! 9/11 had nothing to do with getting your bag searched before
    going to an arena. And in the last two years I've flown to China and Belize
    and security was not much different from when I flew before 9/11 (except now
    they ask you to remove your shoes if you think they might set off the metal
    detector).
    Charlie C., Dec 5, 2003
    #15
  16. Andrew McDonald

    Alan Browne Guest

    Ben Thomas wrote:

    > Alan Browne wrote:


    >> Yes, esp. if it is white. If they are doing a bag search, put it in a
    >> sweater or something at the bottom of the bag and put a cheap 28-80 or
    >> 50mm on the camera body until you're seated for 10 min. or so. Just
    >> hope they don't dig for booze.

    >
    >
    > What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    > Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's
    > legal in the USA.


    It's called controlling booze, drugs and the really big danger to
    society: bearers of fast/long glass. There is some notion that people
    shooting from the seats are going to pub the phots thereby depriving the
    show/artists of revenue.

    When you pay to enter a venue, the venue operator enters into a contract
    with you. As part of the contract you submit to having yourself
    searched. While I know nothing about 'roo law, I would bet a venue
    operator down under could do the same if he wanted. Fortunatly (for
    you), Australia is one of the few chilled places left on this planet,
    ....just don't bet it will last forever.

    Cheers,
    Alan

    --
    e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, Dec 5, 2003
    #16
  17. Andrew McDonald

    Alan Browne Guest

    Rick wrote:

    > "Ben Thomas" <> wrote in message news:prfoqb.1ue.ln@192.168.11.2...
    >
    >>What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    >>Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's legal
    >>in the USA.

    >
    >
    > Americans have been bending over like sheeple ever since
    > 9/11/01. We're even forced to listen to "God Bless America"
    > now during baseball games, as if they're fucking revival meetings.
    > And try flying into one of our airports these days, it's something
    > straight out of a George Orwell novel.


    BS1: this has nothing to do with arenas and statdiums and such who have
    been searching for booze, drugs, guns and cameras long before Sept. 11.

    B.S.2: Flying in the US even in the months after Sept 11 was not so bad,
    considering. Did it many many many times, and except for a slower sec.
    gate passage (no big deal), was little different than before. Only had
    one real problem clearing an outbound carnet in Orlando .. but that was
    more the US Customs 'fault' for very poor logistics at Orlando and
    refusal to clear 'outbound' at Montreal (US customs at Montreal will do
    inbound (to US) carnet's but not outbound.) The
    Montreal-Washington/Reagan flight has become a PITA with extra-careful
    security, secure waiting lounge at Montreal and a double sec. screening
    and search. Also a police officer is on the flight. (Not sure if
    they've relaxed that recently).

    Have to say also that security in most European airports in the early
    90's was almost as tough as the US has become of late.

    >
    > Bin Laden was right -- we really are a paper tiger. Pathetic,
    > spineless corporate prostitutes, the lot of us.


    Fortunately you're not representative of most Americans who are taking
    it all in stride. Just remember to toss Bush next year.

    Alan.

    --
    e-meil: there's no such thing as a FreeLunch.
    Alan Browne, Dec 5, 2003
    #17
  18. Andrew McDonald

    Alan Browne Guest

    Joseph Meehan wrote:

    > Cameras are not professional, users are. If you are not selling your
    > photos, you are not a professional and your equipment is not professional.
    >
    > A Kodak Instamatic is a professional camera when used by a professional.


    A 'real' professional might make a better pic than joe-blow with a
    disposable, but he's not going to bet much revenue on it.
    Alan Browne, Dec 5, 2003
    #18
  19. Andrew McDonald

    Christian Guest

    Ben Thomas wrote:

    > What gives them the right to rifle through your personal possessions?
    > Certainly illegal here in Australia, but I wouldn't be surprised if it's
    > legal in the USA.


    Try going to a major event (sporting, entertainment, whatever) then! Unless
    you're a little old lady, you will almost certainly get your bag checked!
    It's not illegal because you don't HAVE to let them. But if you don't,
    they won't let you in.

    When my parents go to the footy, Mum always carries the bag (containing
    Dad's beer!) and they never get searched.
    Christian, Dec 5, 2003
    #19
  20. Andrew McDonald

    A Little Bit Guest

    On Fri, 05 Dec 2003 02:22:54 GMT, "Tom" <>
    wrote:

    > Come now Ben, half my family are Aussies and I can damn well assure you that
    > intrusive searches ARE a part of Australian daily life. Practically every
    > major store will search bags upon exit, even if you are walking directly out
    > after leaving the checkout cue. Many will insist upon a looksee when
    > entering also.
    >
    > This cannot be restricted to WA only (my family lives in Mandurah).


    Quite true, though you have the option to refuse the search and simply walk out
    of the store. There is bugger all they can do to stop you. If they lay a hand
    on you and discover there are no stolen goods, you can sue them.
    A Little Bit, Dec 5, 2003
    #20
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