Has anyone ever asked Telecom..

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Philip, Apr 3, 2006.

  1. Philip

    Philip Guest

    Why do they impose data caps when most providers abroad don't?

    What is the real cost difference to them of a data cap at 200 MB/1 GB
    /unlimited?

    Philip

    (an interested party)
     
    Philip, Apr 3, 2006
    #1
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  2. Philip

    Rider Guest

    "Philip" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Why do they impose data caps when most providers abroad don't?
    >
    > What is the real cost difference to them of a data cap at 200 MB/1 GB
    > /unlimited?
    >
    > Philip
    >
    > (an interested party)


    Because they can. And they make more money by charging for 'excess data over
    the cap'. The joys of a monopoly.

    Rider
     
    Rider, Apr 3, 2006
    #2
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  3. Philip

    Vista Guest

    "Philip" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Why do they impose data caps when most providers abroad don't?
    >
    > What is the real cost difference to them of a data cap at 200 MB/1 GB
    > /unlimited?
    >
    > Philip
    >
    > (an interested party)\\


    I am pretty sure that they would have a reply to that question, in fact I
    have heard it before some time ago. Telecom are essentially a law firm that
    also provides telecommunication services.
     
    Vista, Apr 3, 2006
    #3
  4. Philip

    David Guest

    Philip wrote:
    > Why do they impose data caps when most providers abroad don't?
    >
    > What is the real cost difference to them of a data cap at 200 MB/1 GB
    > /unlimited?
    >
    > Philip
    >
    > (an interested party)


    There is a huge cost difference. With 200MB, that connection can be used
    to its full capacity for only a few hours each month. As telecom's
    network has very limited capacity from the DSL box thingies to the main
    data networks, it cannot possibly support people actually using their
    connections at anywhere the full speed for all, or even part of the month.

    It's interesting to note the increase in data caps over the last few
    years since DSL became widely available. With jetstart, we had 128k both
    ways, and 10GB a month with free national data, and a lot more from
    other ISPs (orcon had 35GB a month?). These plans were about the same
    price as today's plans with similar data caps, and the few expensive
    plans with higher caps are not really affordable for the home user.
     
    David, Apr 3, 2006
    #4
  5. On Mon, 3 Apr 2006 15:32:13 +1200, "Rider"
    <> wrote:


    >
    >Because they can. And they make more money by charging for 'excess data over
    >the cap'. The joys of a monopoly.



    and the stupidity of the 1984 - 1999 new right , free marketers
    selling off OUR assetts


    Patrick
     
    Patrick FitzGerald, Apr 3, 2006
    #5
  6. On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 15:24:36 +1200, someone purporting to be Philip didst
    scrawl:

    > Why do they impose data caps when most providers abroad don't?
    >

    Because, according to them, it's so expensive to get data overseas. Of
    course, they conveniently forget to mention that they impose caps on the
    wholesaled connections between them and the ISP's, and those then
    necessitate capping by the ISP's to avoid going above their data allowance
    and incurring extra costs.

    > What is the real cost difference to them of a data cap at 200 MB/1 GB
    > /unlimited?
    >

    Fuckall of nothing, really, except that their shoddy network backbone
    cannot cope with uncapped traffic. To avoid having to put in good
    back-haul, they impose artificial limitations by way of caps.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, Apr 3, 2006
    #6
  7. On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 19:54:09 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:

    > Fuckall of nothing, really, except that their shoddy network backbone
    > cannot cope with uncapped traffic. To avoid having to put in good
    > back-haul, they impose artificial limitations by way of caps.


    I thought that "back-haul" was the connection between roadside cabinets
    (where the signals to/from individual houses get multiplexed together) and
    the exchange.


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "When a company starts fighting over IP, it's a
    sign they've lost the real battle, for users."
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 3, 2006
    #7
  8. Philip

    colinco Guest

    In article Matthew Poole says...
    > Fuckall of nothing, really, except that their shoddy network backbone
    > cannot cope with uncapped traffic. To avoid having to put in good
    > back-haul, they impose artificial limitations by way of caps.
    >

    Well until someone else gets off their arse and does something you'll
    have to wait or whinge!
     
    colinco, Apr 3, 2006
    #8
  9. Philip

    Kent Smith Guest

    "Matthew Poole" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 15:24:36 +1200, someone purporting to be Philip didst
    > scrawl:
    >
    >> Why do they impose data caps when most providers abroad don't?
    >>

    > Because, according to them, it's so expensive to get data overseas. Of
    > course, they conveniently forget to mention that they impose caps on the
    > wholesaled connections between them and the ISP's, and those then
    > necessitate capping by the ISP's to avoid going above their data allowance
    > and incurring extra costs.
    >

    And also forget to mention that they have a majority share in the company
    that sets the prices for overseas traffic (i.e southern cross cable).


    -KENT
     
    Kent Smith, Apr 3, 2006
    #9
  10. On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 20:06:49 +1200, someone purporting to be Have A Nice
    Cup of Tea didst scrawl:

    > On Mon, 03 Apr 2006 19:54:09 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:
    >
    >> Fuckall of nothing, really, except that their shoddy network backbone
    >> cannot cope with uncapped traffic. To avoid having to put in good
    >> back-haul, they impose artificial limitations by way of caps.

    >
    > I thought that "back-haul" was the connection between roadside cabinets
    > (where the signals to/from individual houses get multiplexed together) and
    > the exchange.
    >

    It can refer to several points. In this context I'm referring to the
    aggregation links that carry the traffic back to be split out for
    individual ISP's. Last I knew that was being done at the RAN, so it would
    be the DSLAM-RAN links.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, Apr 4, 2006
    #10
  11. On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 17:43:07 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:
    > It can refer to several points. In this context I'm referring to the
    > aggregation links that carry the traffic back to be split out for
    > individual ISP's. Last I knew that was being done at the RAN, so it would
    > be the DSLAM-RAN links.


    And what is a "DSLAM-RAN"?


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "When a company starts fighting over IP, it's a
    sign they've lost the real battle, for users."
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 4, 2006
    #11
  12. On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 20:36:20 +1200, someone purporting to be Have A Nice
    Cup of Tea didst scrawl:

    > On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 17:43:07 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:
    >> It can refer to several points. In this context I'm referring to the
    >> aggregation links that carry the traffic back to be split out for
    >> individual ISP's. Last I knew that was being done at the RAN, so it would
    >> be the DSLAM-RAN links.

    >
    > And what is a "DSLAM-RAN"?
    >

    DSLAM is DSL Access Multiplexer. It's the box that splits connections out
    for delivery to the home. A RAN, or Regional Access Node, aggregates the
    connections from a bunch of DSLAM's and then splits the traffic for
    delivery to the relevant ISP.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, Apr 4, 2006
    #12
  13. On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 20:41:51 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:

    >> And what is a "DSLAM-RAN"?
    >>

    > DSLAM is DSL Access Multiplexer. It's the box that splits connections out
    > for delivery to the home. A RAN, or Regional Access Node, aggregates the
    > connections from a bunch of DSLAM's and then splits the traffic for
    > delivery to the relevant ISP.


    Oh.

    I had an idea what a DSLAM was. I had no idea what a RAN was. IS there any
    other part of Telecom's network that you have a TLA or an XTLA for?


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    "When a company starts fighting over IP, it's a
    sign they've lost the real battle, for users."
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 4, 2006
    #13
  14. Philip

    Enkidu Guest

    Have A Nice Cup of Tea wrote:
    > On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 20:41:51 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:
    >
    >
    >>> And what is a "DSLAM-RAN"?
    >>>

    >>
    >> DSLAM is DSL Access Multiplexer. It's the box that splits
    >> connections out for delivery to the home. A RAN, or Regional Access
    >> Node, aggregates the connections from a bunch of DSLAM's and then
    >> splits the traffic for delivery to the relevant ISP.

    >
    >
    > Oh.
    >
    > I had an idea what a DSLAM was. I had no idea what a RAN was. IS
    > there any other part of Telecom's network that you have a TLA or an
    > XTLA for?
    >

    About as many as any telco, I'd say.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Apr 4, 2006
    #14
  15. On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 21:42:37 +1200, someone purporting to be Have A Nice
    Cup of Tea didst scrawl:

    > On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 20:41:51 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:

    *SNIP*
    > I had an idea what a DSLAM was. I had no idea what a RAN was. IS there any
    > other part of Telecom's network that you have a TLA or an XTLA for?
    >

    The whole IT/telecomm's industry is ripe with (X)TLA's. I actually got the
    proper name for RAN from Verizon's website, so it's not something I made
    up just to confuse you. I'd never heard it called anything other than RAN,
    so had no idea what it stood for.

    --
    Matthew Poole
    "Don't use force. Get a bigger hammer."
     
    Matthew Poole, Apr 5, 2006
    #15
  16. On Wed, 05 Apr 2006 11:43:12 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:

    > On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 21:42:37 +1200, someone purporting to be Have A Nice
    > Cup of Tea didst scrawl:
    >
    >> On Tue, 04 Apr 2006 20:41:51 +1200, Matthew Poole wrote:

    > *SNIP*
    >> I had an idea what a DSLAM was. I had no idea what a RAN was. IS there any
    >> other part of Telecom's network that you have a TLA or an XTLA for?
    >>

    > The whole IT/telecomm's industry is ripe with (X)TLA's. I actually got the
    > proper name for RAN from Verizon's website, so it's not something I made
    > up just to confuse you. I'd never heard it called anything other than RAN,
    > so had no idea what it stood for.


    Yeah, cool. But what other bits are there on Telecom's network?


    Have A Nice Cup of Tea

    --
    1/ Migration to Linux only costs money once. Higher Windows TCO is forever.
    2/ "Shared source" is a poison pill. Open Source is freedom.
    3/ Only the Windows boxes get the worms.
     
    Have A Nice Cup of Tea, Apr 5, 2006
    #16
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