HARRY'S COUSIN DINES IN NYC!

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by JPS@no.komm, Feb 4, 2004.

  1. Guest

    , Feb 4, 2004
    #1
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  2. Kayla Guest

    Kayla, Feb 4, 2004
    #2
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  3. Mark M Guest

    "Kayla" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > And I just had to go there!! ;-(
    >
    >
    >
    > On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 02:02:53 GMT, wrote:
    >
    > >HARRY'S COUSIN DINES IN NYC!
    > >


    http://www.pbase.com/image/25749320

    Yummy Yum Yum!
     
    Mark M, Feb 4, 2004
    #3
  4. Guest

    In message <>,
    Kayla <> wrote:

    >And I just had to go there!! ;-(


    Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    branches, and fly.

    >On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 02:02:53 GMT, wrote:
    >
    >>HARRY'S COUSIN DINES IN NYC!
    >>
    >>http://www.pbase.com/image/25749320


    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Feb 4, 2004
    #4
  5. George Kerby Guest

    On 2/4/04 5:29 AM, in article ,
    "" <> wrote:

    > In message <>,
    > Kayla <> wrote:
    >
    >> And I just had to go there!! ;-(

    >
    > Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    > branches, and fly.
    >

    Yep! Anni wasn't there with a Big Mac.


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    George Kerby, Feb 4, 2004
    #5
  6. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In message <>,
    > Kayla <> wrote:
    >
    > >And I just had to go there!! ;-(

    >
    > Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    > branches, and fly.


    NYC hawks usually eat pigeons. They are bigger than mice, and easier to
    catch.


    > >On Wed, 04 Feb 2004 02:02:53 GMT, wrote:
    > >
    > >>HARRY'S COUSIN DINES IN NYC!
    > >>
    > >>http://www.pbase.com/image/25749320

    >
    > --
    >
    > <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    > John P Sheehy <>
    > ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Feb 4, 2004
    #6
  7. Guest

    wrote:

    > Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    > branches, and fly.


    I once reduced someone to tears by pointing out an American Crow that
    was flying to a songbird nest, while the parents were away, and
    picking up a hatchling.

    You could see the hatchling squirming as the Crow flew away to consume
    its lunch in peace.

    Curiously, this same person had no trouble watching an American
    Kestrel rip apart a mouse.

    Bambi worship is weird.
     
    , Feb 4, 2004
    #7
  8. Guest

    In message <>,
    "Marvin Margoshes" <> wrote:

    ><> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> In message <>,
    >> Kayla <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >And I just had to go there!! ;-(

    >>
    >> Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    >> branches, and fly.

    >
    >NYC hawks usually eat pigeons. They are bigger than mice, and easier to
    >catch.


    Red-Tailed Hawks are big rodent eaters. Maybe you're thinking of other
    hawk species? The Sharp-shinned Hawks are more likely to eat birds.
    I've only seen Red-Tails eating squirrels, mice (once in a glue trap),
    and chipmunks.

    The highest population of Red-Tails I've encountered is Bronx Park,
    especially in and around the Zoo. The Zoo has a rodent abundance -
    shrews, rabbits, chipmunks, house mice.
    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Feb 4, 2004
    #8
  9. Annika1980 Guest

    Annika1980, Feb 5, 2004
    #9
  10. Guest

    In message <>,
    (Annika1980) wrote:

    >>From:

    >
    >>HARRY'S COUSIN DINES IN NYC!
    >>
    >>http://www.pbase.com/image/25749320

    >
    >Way Cool!
    >Is that the squirrel's eyeball on the limb?


    I do't think so; I think it still had two eyes at this point (but they
    were apparently out of service).

    >Hawks Rule !!! (squirrels anyway)


    They don't rule crows, though. I've seen crows chase a hawk away.

    --

    <>>< ><<> ><<> <>>< ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<>
    John P Sheehy <>
    ><<> <>>< <>>< ><<> <>>< ><<> ><<> <>><
     
    , Feb 5, 2004
    #10
  11. <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > wrote:
    >
    > > Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    > > branches, and fly.

    >
    > I once reduced someone to tears by pointing out an American Crow that
    > was flying to a songbird nest, while the parents were away, and
    > picking up a hatchling.
    >
    > You could see the hatchling squirming as the Crow flew away to consume
    > its lunch in peace.
    >
    > Curiously, this same person had no trouble watching an American
    > Kestrel rip apart a mouse.
    >
    > Bambi worship is weird.


    A pair of Canada geese nested under a tree on the edge of a pond, in the
    front of a building where I worked. One day, I watched as a crow waited in
    the tree for a chance to get an egg. One goose was sitting on the egg, and
    the other was in the water and getting increasingly agitated. inally, the
    one in teh water tried to fly into the tree to get at the crow. The crow
    stayed in place. Eventually, the crow left, but obviously not because of a
    goose trying to fly into a tree.

    A hawk comes regularly to the bird feeder at my daughter's house. It isn't
    there for the seed. It catches a bird often enough to make the visits
    worthwhile.

    I've also watched groups of small birds chasing a crow away. It is life in
    the raw.
     
    Marvin Margoshes, Feb 5, 2004
    #11
  12. George Kerby Guest

    On 2/5/04 11:06 AM, in article , "Marvin
    Margoshes" <> wrote:

    >
    > <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Sorry, but that's what hawks really do. They don't just pose on
    >>> branches, and fly.

    >>
    >> I once reduced someone to tears by pointing out an American Crow that
    >> was flying to a songbird nest, while the parents were away, and
    >> picking up a hatchling.
    >>
    >> You could see the hatchling squirming as the Crow flew away to consume
    >> its lunch in peace.
    >>
    >> Curiously, this same person had no trouble watching an American
    >> Kestrel rip apart a mouse.
    >>
    >> Bambi worship is weird.

    >
    > A pair of Canada geese nested under a tree on the edge of a pond, in the
    > front of a building where I worked. One day, I watched as a crow waited in
    > the tree for a chance to get an egg. One goose was sitting on the egg, and
    > the other was in the water and getting increasingly agitated. inally, the
    > one in teh water tried to fly into the tree to get at the crow. The crow
    > stayed in place. Eventually, the crow left, but obviously not because of a
    > goose trying to fly into a tree.
    >
    > A hawk comes regularly to the bird feeder at my daughter's house. It isn't
    > there for the seed. It catches a bird often enough to make the visits
    > worthwhile.
    >
    > I've also watched groups of small birds chasing a crow away. It is life in
    > the raw.
    >
    >

    And a Road Runner can kick a Rattlesnake's ass.


    _______________________________________________________________________________
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    George Kerby, Feb 5, 2004
    #12
  13. Tom Monego Guest


    >A pair of Canada geese nested under a tree on the edge of a pond, in the
    >front of a building where I worked. One day, I watched as a crow waited in
    >the tree for a chance to get an egg. One goose was sitting on the egg, and
    >the other was in the water and getting increasingly agitated. inally, the
    >one in teh water tried to fly into the tree to get at the crow. The crow
    >stayed in place. Eventually, the crow left, but obviously not because of a
    >goose trying to fly into a tree.
    >
    >A hawk comes regularly to the bird feeder at my daughter's house. It isn't
    >there for the seed. It catches a bird often enough to make the visits
    >worthwhile.
    >
    >I've also watched groups of small birds chasing a crow away. It is life in
    >the raw.
    >


    Hey once saw a canada goose wipe out my cat with its wing, the cat went flying.
    Never tried to attack a gosling again. Very tough birds and great parents.
     
    Tom Monego, Feb 6, 2004
    #13
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