Hard Drive Replacent

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Bryan, Feb 16, 2007.

  1. Bryan

    Bryan Guest

    My HD is full on my laptop.

    I want to replace my HD.

    Is there a way to copy my OS, registry, programs, and files onto a new HD so
    that I don't have to find my disks and reinstall everything all over again?
     
    Bryan, Feb 16, 2007
    #1
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  2. Bryan

    olfart Guest

    "Bryan" <> wrote in message
    news:v5eBh.10813$...
    > My HD is full on my laptop.
    >
    > I want to replace my HD.
    >
    > Is there a way to copy my OS, registry, programs, and files onto a new HD
    > so that I don't have to find my disks and reinstall everything all over
    > again?
    >

    yes
     
    olfart, Feb 16, 2007
    #2
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  3. Bryan

    Toby Guest

    "Bryan" <> wrote in message
    news:v5eBh.10813$...
    > My HD is full on my laptop.
    >
    > I want to replace my HD.
    >
    > Is there a way to copy my OS, registry, programs, and files onto a new HD
    > so that I don't have to find my disks and reinstall everything all over
    > again?


    There are cloning programs out there that will copy your disk byte for byte
    onto a new hard disk, which you then can simply substitute for your existing
    HDD. I like Acronis True Image, but there are others. Acronis lets you clone
    your disk via USB, so when I had a dicey HDD I simply bought another HDD,
    mounted it in a 2.5" USB drive chassis, plugged it in via USB 2.0 to my
    notebook and let Acronis clone my existing HDD to the one in the case. I
    then plugged it in in place of my original HDD and end of story.

    Toby
     
    Toby, Feb 16, 2007
    #3
  4. Bryan

    John A Guest

    "Bryan" <> wrote in message
    news:v5eBh.10813$...
    > My HD is full on my laptop.
    >
    > I want to replace my HD.
    >
    > Is there a way to copy my OS, registry, programs, and files onto a new HD

    so
    > that I don't have to find my disks and reinstall everything all over

    again?
    >
    >

    Beware. Copying a hard drive to an identical hard drive is very easy - and a
    lot of the advice you will get (are already getting?) will assume that this
    is what you are doing. It gets a lot more difficult when the target drive is
    different - which is the challenge you face.

    Can I suggest that you take a more positive approach to "everything all over
    again"? Our PCs get bogged down with use. A spring clean - i.e. a fresh
    install from scratch - will almost certainly result in a faster, less
    crash-prone system. What is more, by forcing you to assess the junk on your
    current hard disk, you'll probably find that you end up not transferring a
    lot of your old "essentials". You'll also leave any lurking malware behind.
    Who knows, you may look back and realise that you never needed the new,
    bigger, drive after all?

    BTW, when you've set up your new system consisting of an OS and your
    fundamental application software, Ghost the partition and then your NEXT
    spring clean will be a breeze!
     
    John A, Feb 16, 2007
    #4
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