Hard drive problem

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Tommy Thibodeau, Dec 20, 2003.

  1. I recently bought a new pc with WinXp for home and I would like to access my
    'very old' hard drive as a slave to save my old files. Win XP detects it
    but since it is 'dblspace', it sees only the host drive (H:) that contains
    the 2 .bin files. Is there a way to access the rest of the HD????

    Thanks for your help!
     
    Tommy Thibodeau, Dec 20, 2003
    #1
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  2. Tommy Thibodeau

    Thor Guest

    In short, WinXP does not support DoubleSpace or DriveSpace compressed
    volumes, so you'll have to put the drive into a Win9X machine, and get your
    data off the drive onto some uncompressed media or uncompress the drive
    itself (using Win98) if there is adequate space to do so. If you simply wish
    to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't currently contain
    any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive.


    ...
    "Tommy Thibodeau" <> wrote in message
    news:kb_Eb.25179$...
    > I recently bought a new pc with WinXp for home and I would like to access

    my
    > 'very old' hard drive as a slave to save my old files. Win XP detects it
    > but since it is 'dblspace', it sees only the host drive (H:) that contains
    > the 2 .bin files. Is there a way to access the rest of the HD????
    >
    > Thanks for your help!
    >
    >
    >
     
    Thor, Dec 20, 2003
    #2
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  3. Tommy Thibodeau

    Trent© Guest

    On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:48:35 -0500, "Tommy Thibodeau"
    <> wrote:

    >I recently bought a new pc with WinXp for home and I would like to access my
    >'very old' hard drive as a slave to save my old files. Win XP detects it
    >but since it is 'dblspace', it sees only the host drive (H:) that contains
    >the 2 .bin files. Is there a way to access the rest of the HD????
    >
    >Thanks for your help!


    Just guessing...since I've never had to try this...but...

    Temporarily, create an autoexec.bat and a config.sys file in XP...in
    order to load the drivers for doublespace. You might even be able to
    use the ones that are on the old drive.

    You'll need to copy/bring over the drivers also, of course...and make
    sure the commands point to the proper location of the drivers. These
    drivers may not work...so the whole process may not work.

    Here's another idea...if the xp machines isn't NTFS...

    Make the OLD drive the master...temporarily...and the new drive the
    slave. It'll go thru hoops the first time...trying to load all the
    new hardware. Just hit cancel whenever you get the chance...even for
    the video and other junk. When yer finally all booted up...and it
    might look like crap!...to into Explorer and copy everything over to a
    temp directory onto the new drive. When done, change the drives
    back...or get rid of the old drive.

    Or you can do the same thing by temporarily hooking up the new drive
    as an extra drive on your old machine.

    Make sure you remember to change the drive jumpers when you do all
    this...and then back again.

    Good luck. Let us know how you make out.



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Trent©, Dec 21, 2003
    #3
  4. Tommy Thibodeau

    Trent© Guest

    On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 16:31:05 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:

    >In short, WinXP does not support DoubleSpace or DriveSpace compressed
    >volumes, so you'll have to put the drive into a Win9X machine, and get your
    >data off the drive onto some uncompressed media or uncompress the drive
    >itself (using Win98) if there is adequate space to do so. If you simply wish
    >to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't currently contain
    >any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive.


    Which drive? He'll have 2.

    You meant re-partition, of course.

    Actually, the best way is to uninstall doublespace.



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Trent©, Dec 21, 2003
    #4
  5. Tommy Thibodeau

    Jerry G. Guest

    I would not try this, unless the double space software would be rated for
    XP. He can end up having an XP system that is unstable, or not even
    starting up. He would then have to reinstall the complete system, and go
    through re-registering it.

    --

    Greetings,

    Jerry Greenberg GLG Technologies GLG
    =========================================
    WebPage http://www.zoom-one.com
    Electronics http://www.zoom-one.com/electron.htm
    =========================================


    "Trent©" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 10:48:35 -0500, "Tommy Thibodeau"
    <> wrote:

    >I recently bought a new pc with WinXp for home and I would like to access

    my
    >'very old' hard drive as a slave to save my old files. Win XP detects it
    >but since it is 'dblspace', it sees only the host drive (H:) that contains
    >the 2 .bin files. Is there a way to access the rest of the HD????
    >
    >Thanks for your help!


    Just guessing...since I've never had to try this...but...

    Temporarily, create an autoexec.bat and a config.sys file in XP...in
    order to load the drivers for doublespace. You might even be able to
    use the ones that are on the old drive.

    You'll need to copy/bring over the drivers also, of course...and make
    sure the commands point to the proper location of the drivers. These
    drivers may not work...so the whole process may not work.

    Here's another idea...if the xp machines isn't NTFS...

    Make the OLD drive the master...temporarily...and the new drive the
    slave. It'll go thru hoops the first time...trying to load all the
    new hardware. Just hit cancel whenever you get the chance...even for
    the video and other junk. When yer finally all booted up...and it
    might look like crap!...to into Explorer and copy everything over to a
    temp directory onto the new drive. When done, change the drives
    back...or get rid of the old drive.

    Or you can do the same thing by temporarily hooking up the new drive
    as an extra drive on your old machine.

    Make sure you remember to change the drive jumpers when you do all
    this...and then back again.

    Good luck. Let us know how you make out.



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Jerry G., Dec 21, 2003
    #5
  6. Tommy Thibodeau

    Thor Guest

    "Trent©" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 16:31:05 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:
    >
    > >In short, WinXP does not support DoubleSpace or DriveSpace compressed
    > >volumes, so you'll have to put the drive into a Win9X machine, and get

    your
    > >data off the drive onto some uncompressed media or uncompress the drive
    > >itself (using Win98) if there is adequate space to do so. If you simply

    wish
    > >to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't currently contain
    > >any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive.

    >
    > Which drive? He'll have 2.


    that should be obvious from the context of the last part of the paragraph.

    "If you simply wish to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't
    currently contain
    any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive."


    >
    > You meant re-partition, of course.


    Reformatting a doublespace drive on a system that doesn't have doublespace
    drivers (in this case WinXP), should remove the compressed volume files
    (.Bin files), leaving the whole uncompressed size of the drive available.
    After all, the drive itself is really still using FAT. The compressed files
    are in the .bin files. There's no fancy partitioning going on. The
    doublespace drivers (dblspace.bin & drvspace.bin) and the doublespace-aware
    OS do the job of mounting the CVF as drive letter C:, no special
    partitioning tricks are used. Remove those drivers from the equasion, (As in
    XP) and you see the drive as it really is. A normal FAT volume with a couple
    of .bin files on it, that contain all the compressed data. They are just
    normal files on a normal FAT volume. Nothing special. Format the drive in an
    environment that doesn't mount the drive as doublespaced, or drivespaced,
    and you'll merely format the normal capacity of the drive, eliminating the
    CVF altogether, just as I described.

    >
    > Actually, the best way is to uninstall doublespace.
    >


    If you want the compressed data back, perhaps. But that's not what I was
    addressing with the format suggestion.
     
    Thor, Dec 21, 2003
    #6
  7. Tommy Thibodeau

    Trent© Guest

    On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 08:21:26 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:

    >
    >"Trent©" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 16:31:05 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:
    >>
    >> >In short, WinXP does not support DoubleSpace or DriveSpace compressed
    >> >volumes, so you'll have to put the drive into a Win9X machine, and get

    >your
    >> >data off the drive onto some uncompressed media or uncompress the drive
    >> >itself (using Win98) if there is adequate space to do so. If you simply

    >wish
    >> >to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't currently contain
    >> >any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive.

    >>
    >> Which drive? He'll have 2.

    >
    >that should be obvious from the context of the last part of the paragraph.
    >
    >"If you simply wish to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't
    >currently contain
    >any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive."


    I didn't say which 'physical' drive. I said which 'drive'. He'll
    have 2 on that physical drive.

    >> You meant re-partition, of course.

    >
    >Reformatting a doublespace drive on a system that doesn't have doublespace
    >drivers (in this case WinXP), should remove the compressed volume files
    >(.Bin files), leaving the whole uncompressed size of the drive available.
    >After all, the drive itself is really still using FAT. The compressed files
    >are in the .bin files. There's no fancy partitioning going on. The
    >doublespace drivers (dblspace.bin & drvspace.bin) and the doublespace-aware
    >OS do the job of mounting the CVF as drive letter C:, no special
    >partitioning tricks are used. Remove those drivers from the equasion, (As in
    >XP) and you see the drive as it really is. A normal FAT volume with a couple
    >of .bin files on it, that contain all the compressed data. They are just
    >normal files on a normal FAT volume. Nothing special. Format the drive in an
    >environment that doesn't mount the drive as doublespaced, or drivespaced,
    >and you'll merely format the normal capacity of the drive, eliminating the
    >CVF altogether, just as I described.


    Its been YEARS since I've used that program...and probably for you,
    too. But I vaguely remember that the REAL drive being accessed is the
    H drive...which creates the C drive that is seen.

    And, IIRC, the H drive is hidden.

    Maybe I'll take out an old drive and have at it again. Then
    again...maybe not! lol

    >> Actually, the best way is to uninstall doublespace.
    >>

    >
    >If you want the compressed data back, perhaps. But that's not what I was
    >addressing with the format suggestion.


    I understand that. And I'm guessing...but not sure, of course...that
    what you suggested isn't possible. At least not easily...by a
    neophyte.



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Trent©, Dec 21, 2003
    #7
  8. Tommy Thibodeau

    Trent© Guest

    On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 23:50:38 -0500, "Jerry G." <>
    wrote:

    >I would not try this, unless the double space software would be rated for
    >XP. He can end up having an XP system that is unstable, or not even
    >starting up.


    How would this happen, Jerry? Can you be more specific?


    >He would then have to reinstall the complete system,


    If necessary, do you think a repair install might be possible?

    > and go
    >through re-registering it.


    He'd hafta re-register the program?



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Trent©, Dec 21, 2003
    #8
  9. Tommy Thibodeau

    Thor Guest

    "Trent©" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 08:21:26 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:
    >
    > >
    > >"Trent©" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >> On Sat, 20 Dec 2003 16:31:05 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:
    > >>
    > >> >In short, WinXP does not support DoubleSpace or DriveSpace compressed
    > >> >volumes, so you'll have to put the drive into a Win9X machine, and get

    > >your
    > >> >data off the drive onto some uncompressed media or uncompress the

    drive
    > >> >itself (using Win98) if there is adequate space to do so. If you

    simply
    > >wish
    > >> >to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it doesn't currently

    contain
    > >> >any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive.
    > >>
    > >> Which drive? He'll have 2.

    > >
    > >that should be obvious from the context of the last part of the

    paragraph.
    > >
    > >"If you simply wish to use the drive as extra storage in XP, and it

    doesn't
    > >currently contain
    > >any files you wish to preserve, then simply reformat the drive."

    >
    > I didn't say which 'physical' drive. I said which 'drive'. He'll
    > have 2 on that physical drive.


    No it won't, not when it's hooked to a machine with no doublespace drivers.
    Only one drive letter will appear. The extra drive letter only exists in the
    CVF, and that's only visible when the OS is doublespace-aware, and has
    mounted the CVF as a drive letter.

    >
    > >> You meant re-partition, of course.

    > >
    > >Reformatting a doublespace drive on a system that doesn't have

    doublespace
    > >drivers (in this case WinXP), should remove the compressed volume files
    > >(.Bin files), leaving the whole uncompressed size of the drive available.
    > >After all, the drive itself is really still using FAT. The compressed

    files
    > >are in the .bin files. There's no fancy partitioning going on. The
    > >doublespace drivers (dblspace.bin & drvspace.bin) and the

    doublespace-aware
    > >OS do the job of mounting the CVF as drive letter C:, no special
    > >partitioning tricks are used. Remove those drivers from the equasion, (As

    in
    > >XP) and you see the drive as it really is. A normal FAT volume with a

    couple
    > >of .bin files on it, that contain all the compressed data. They are just
    > >normal files on a normal FAT volume. Nothing special. Format the drive in

    an
    > >environment that doesn't mount the drive as doublespaced, or drivespaced,
    > >and you'll merely format the normal capacity of the drive, eliminating

    the
    > >CVF altogether, just as I described.

    >
    > Its been YEARS since I've used that program...and probably for you,
    > too. But I vaguely remember that the REAL drive being accessed is the
    > H drive...which creates the C drive that is seen.


    All doublespace does, is create the CVF (compressed volume file) and moves
    the drive's data into the CVF. Then it sets up the boot files to load the
    doublespace drivers. The re-lettering of the physical drive as "H" is done
    dynamically when the doublespace drivers load, and the CVF file is then
    given the drive "C:" designation. This is basically like taking almost every
    file on your system and moving it into a single zipfile, save for a few boot
    files necessary to mount the zipfile as a virtual drive. From the user's
    standpoint, you just gained a substantial amount of space on C:, but in
    reality, what was the C: drive is now the H: drive, and C: is now just the
    letter assigned to the CVF when it's mounted at bootup, by the doublespace
    drivers. Take away the doublespace drivers, and you see the drive in it's
    true form, that being a normal FAT volume, with one compressed volume file
    on it, along with a few files that cannot reside in the CVF (because they
    need to load before the CVF is mounted as a drive letter). If you format a
    doublespaced or drivespaced drive on a system that can recognize FAT, but
    does not support mounting doublespace volume files, you will simply erase
    the CVF, and the boot files from the drive. You'll end up with a normal
    uncompressed, freshly formatted drive. There are not multiple partitions
    involved with doublespacing, unless you started out with multiple partitions
    prior to even doublespacing the drive, hence no problem for the OP to format
    it with XP if he merely wants the drive as extra storage. When formatting
    the drive, there will normally be only one drive letter to pick from on the
    physical drive because the CVF will not be mounted, due to XP's lack of
    doublespace support. So no confusion there.

    >
    > And, IIRC, the H drive is hidden.


    The H: drive isn't hidden. The CVF, if memory serves me, is a hidden/system
    *file*.

    >
    > Maybe I'll take out an old drive and have at it again. Then
    > again...maybe not! lol
    >
    > >> Actually, the best way is to uninstall doublespace.
    > >>

    > >
    > >If you want the compressed data back, perhaps. But that's not what I was
    > >addressing with the format suggestion.

    >
    > I understand that. And I'm guessing...but not sure, of course...that
    > what you suggested isn't possible. At least not easily...by a
    > neophyte.


    If the data isn't important, all he need do is hook up the drive to his XP
    system as a slave, etc, go to the disk management tools, and format it.
    There's no more difficulty there than if the drive weren't doublespaced. If
    one is such a neophyte that formatting in general is too daunting, then I'd
    be inclined to agree. But in this case, doublespace doesn't increase the
    difficulties when hooked up to an XP box.
     
    Thor, Dec 22, 2003
    #9
  10. Tommy Thibodeau

    Trent© Guest

    On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 20:05:50 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:

    >> I didn't say which 'physical' drive. I said which 'drive'. He'll
    >> have 2 on that physical drive.

    >
    >No it won't, not when it's hooked to a machine with no doublespace drivers.
    >Only one drive letter will appear. The extra drive letter only exists in the
    >CVF, and that's only visible when the OS is doublespace-aware, and has
    >mounted the CVF as a drive letter.


    >> Its been YEARS since I've used that program...and probably for you,
    >> too. But I vaguely remember that the REAL drive being accessed is the
    >> H drive...which creates the C drive that is seen.

    >
    >All doublespace does, is create the CVF (compressed volume file) and moves
    >the drive's data into the CVF. Then it sets up the boot files to load the
    >doublespace drivers. The re-lettering of the physical drive as "H" is done
    >dynamically when the doublespace drivers load, and the CVF file is then
    >given the drive "C:" designation. This is basically like taking almost every
    >file on your system and moving it into a single zipfile, save for a few boot
    >files necessary to mount the zipfile as a virtual drive. From the user's
    >standpoint, you just gained a substantial amount of space on C:, but in
    >reality, what was the C: drive is now the H: drive, and C: is now just the
    >letter assigned to the CVF when it's mounted at bootup, by the doublespace
    >drivers. Take away the doublespace drivers, and you see the drive in it's
    >true form, that being a normal FAT volume, with one compressed volume file
    >on it, along with a few files that cannot reside in the CVF (because they
    >need to load before the CVF is mounted as a drive letter). If you format a
    >doublespaced or drivespaced drive on a system that can recognize FAT, but
    >does not support mounting doublespace volume files, you will simply erase
    >the CVF, and the boot files from the drive. You'll end up with a normal
    >uncompressed, freshly formatted drive. There are not multiple partitions
    >involved with doublespacing, unless you started out with multiple partitions
    >prior to even doublespacing the drive, hence no problem for the OP to format
    >it with XP if he merely wants the drive as extra storage. When formatting
    >the drive, there will normally be only one drive letter to pick from on the
    >physical drive because the CVF will not be mounted, due to XP's lack of
    >doublespace support. So no confusion there.
    >
    >>
    >> And, IIRC, the H drive is hidden.

    >
    >The H: drive isn't hidden. The CVF, if memory serves me, is a hidden/system
    >*file*.


    All you said sounds reasonable to me.

    Just for grins, I might create one again over the long weekend. But I
    vaguely remember having a problem trying to format a drive that's
    previously been doublespaced.



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Trent©, Dec 22, 2003
    #10
  11. Tommy Thibodeau

    Trent© Guest

    On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 20:05:50 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:

    Tried it, Thor...and experimented with all the bells and whistles.

    Works exactly as you described...and no problem in reformatting.

    Good job.



    Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...

    Trent

    Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
     
    Trent©, Dec 23, 2003
    #11
  12. Tommy Thibodeau

    Thor Guest

    :)


    "Trent©" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 20:05:50 -0500, "Thor" <> wrote:
    >
    > Tried it, Thor...and experimented with all the bells and whistles.
    >
    > Works exactly as you described...and no problem in reformatting.
    >
    > Good job.
    >
    >
    >
    > Wishing you and yours a happy holiday season...
    >
    > Trent
    >
    > Proud member of the Roy Rogers fan club!
    >
     
    Thor, Dec 23, 2003
    #12
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