Hard drive diagnostics

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by jeff, Oct 23, 2005.

  1. jeff

    jeff Guest

    what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?

    i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    storage.

    I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    all of them.
    jeff, Oct 23, 2005
    #1
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  2. jeff

    PC Guest

    "jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?
    >
    > i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    > level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    > storage.
    >
    > I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    > all of them.




    You're kidding!

    "Before using them for storage" and they have "bad blocks"
    Quickest way I could think of to loose data.

    If a drive show's 'bad blocks' it has already used up all the 'spare' blocks
    because it is FAILING.
    That is 'Dying, Karking it, Passing on, About to phutz........

    Low level formating may well get a portion of the bad blocks back for a
    period of time.
    But at the end of the day the bad blocks turn up because either the
    recording media on the platters is going flakey, or because the electronics
    on the drive can not read the data.

    Just my 2c
    Pc
    PC, Oct 23, 2005
    #2
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  3. jeff

    Guest

    I use SpinRite 6. It works on all OS's. It will move the data from the
    bad sectors and seal off those clusters, making the rest of the
    harddrive usable.
    Just my two cents...
    donnalynne
    , Oct 23, 2005
    #3
  4. jeff

    Plato Guest

    jeff wrote:
    >
    > what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?


    The ones that come from the hard drive maker. All of them are free.

    > i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    > level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    > storage.


    If its really a bad block/sector, then a zero fill and/or format will
    lock up while running. If it's only an incorrectly marked bad area,
    then a zero fill will fix it.

    > I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    > all of them.


    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
    Plato, Oct 23, 2005
    #4
  5. jeff

    M Guest

    This ones free
    http://seatools.seagatestorage.com/en
    "jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?
    >
    > i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    > level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    > storage.
    >
    > I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    > all of them.
    M, Oct 23, 2005
    #5
  6. jeff

    jeff Guest

    On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 14:39:12 +1300, "PC" <> wrote:

    >"jeff" <> wrote in message
    >news:p...
    >> what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?
    >>
    >> i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    >> level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    >> storage.
    >>
    >> I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    >> all of them.

    >
    >
    >
    >You're kidding!
    >
    >"Before using them for storage" and they have "bad blocks"
    >Quickest way I could think of to loose data.
    >
    >If a drive show's 'bad blocks' it has already used up all the 'spare' blocks
    >because it is FAILING.
    >That is 'Dying, Karking it, Passing on, About to phutz........
    >
    >Low level formating may well get a portion of the bad blocks back for a
    >period of time.
    >But at the end of the day the bad blocks turn up because either the
    >recording media on the platters is going flakey, or because the electronics
    >on the drive can not read the data.
    >
    >Just my 2c
    >Pc
    >



    so a 200 gig drive is DEAD because of 2 bad blocks?
    jeff, Oct 23, 2005
    #6
  7. jeff

    PC Guest

    "jeff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 14:39:12 +1300, "PC" <> wrote:
    >
    >>"jeff" <> wrote in message
    >>news:p...
    >>> what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?
    >>>
    >>> i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    >>> level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    >>> storage.
    >>>
    >>> I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    >>> all of them.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>You're kidding!
    >>
    >>"Before using them for storage" and they have "bad blocks"
    >>Quickest way I could think of to loose data.
    >>
    >>If a drive show's 'bad blocks' it has already used up all the 'spare'
    >>blocks
    >>because it is FAILING.
    >>That is 'Dying, Karking it, Passing on, About to phutz........
    >>
    >>Low level formating may well get a portion of the bad blocks back for a
    >>period of time.
    >>But at the end of the day the bad blocks turn up because either the
    >>recording media on the platters is going flakey, or because the
    >>electronics
    >>on the drive can not read the data.
    >>
    >>Just my 2c
    >>Pc
    >>

    >
    >
    > so a 200 gig drive is DEAD because of 2 bad blocks?
    >



    Jeff

    No not 'dead' just yet, by surely a sign of it's imminent demise!

    One has to remember these two bad blocks (to use your example) are the one's
    you can see.
    What you can't see without the right diagnostics are the other bad blocks
    already mapped out and replaced with spare ones by the drives onboard
    electronics.
    I had a couple of Samsung 20GB that went bad on me a couple of years ago.
    At the time the Samsung Diagnostics allowed you to examine the bad sector
    remapping table held on the drive (along with a whole lot of other
    interesting stuff like power on hours, number of power off restarts etc)
    On both these drives the bad sector remap tables showed the drives had been
    losing sectors from almost the day they were made.
    i.e. the recording media was 'soft'.
    I zero'd one drive just to see what would happen and at a DOS level
    everything came up AOK .
    The bad sector remap table showed however that over the next couple of days
    a number of 'remappings' continued to occur, showing the drive would
    continue to loose data as the sectors failed.
    As others have posted it may be due to incorrectly marked blocks, and will
    respond to a zeroing out.
    If this works, well and good, but if it's because of weak recording media or
    marginal electronics then you are putting your data at serious risk of loss.

    I would agree though i'ts difficult to accept a nearly new 200GB drive is
    failing, but it does happen.

    Which brings up the thought that a drive that size would surely have had a 3
    or 5 year warranty and still be returnable under such a warranty, wouldn't
    it?

    Cheers
    Paul.
    PC, Oct 24, 2005
    #7
  8. jeff

    jeff Guest

    Re: Hard drive diagnostics -update

    On Sun, 23 Oct 2005 01:25:23 GMT, jeff <> wrote:

    >what diagnostic software do ya'll use for hard drives?
    >
    >i've got a stack of drives here that have bad blocks, Im going to low
    >level format them but want to run a diag on them before using them for
    >storage.
    >
    >I know of the manufacturer tools, but want something standard across
    >all of them.



    actually PC CHECK labels the hard drive as 'failed' because of
    "Unmarked Bad Tracks"

    is that the same as bad blocks?

    not really sure whats going on here.


    I've tested a drive thats failed PC Check with the above message with
    a manufacturer diagnostic tool for drive's maker, and the
    manufacturer's tool says the drive is fine. - PC Check goes through
    the whole drive and marks 'tracks' as bad, doesn't mark anything on
    the drive, just a visual representation of tracks it found bad.


    So if I have a drive with 5 bad 'tracks' out of 200-500 'tracks' , how
    would I mark those as bad so that the drive won't use them anymore?


    thank you !!!
    jeff, Oct 24, 2005
    #8
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