Hard drive backup.

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Funny KAD, Jan 20, 2006.

  1. Funny KAD

    Funny KAD Guest

    Hi all,
    Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard drive
    backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .
    Funny KAD, Jan 20, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Funny KAD

    PC Guest

    "Funny KAD" <> wrote in message
    news:dqrpkt$s7e$-infra.bt.com...
    > Hi all,
    > Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard drive
    > backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .
    >




    Dear Funny KAD

    There are several utilities that will perform 'imaging' as in this 'Google'
    search.
    http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=drive imaging&btnG=Google Search&meta=
    Opinions will vary which is 'best'.
    Backup media varies from a partition on the same drive, external USB drive
    thru to burning to CD R/RW or DVD R/RW.
    Using RW disks for example can keep backup media costs down to a minimum.
    Depending on the method chosen do allow some time for the 'image' to be
    transfered back to the replacement drive.

    Another option to consider is to use a 'Raid' array in 'Mirror' formation
    (Raid 1) as in this setup guide.
    http://www.pctechguide.com/tutorials/RAID.htm

    For the releatively low hardware cost I would recomend a Raid 1 'Mirrored
    solution if short down time is important.
    With a suitable controller the mirroring occurs automatically and all you
    have to do when a drive dies is to unplug the dead one, reboot to the
    'mirror' drive. All of 5 minutes depending on the accessability of the
    hardware.
    Then when the replacement drive arrives, schedule an hour or so for the Raid
    to rebuild it'self to the new Drive (depending on drive size etc)
    Because the system is still running this gives the opportunity to schedule
    this restore for a suitable 'quiet time'.

    Cheers
    Paul.
    PC, Jan 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. Funny KAD

    Funny KAD Guest

    "PC" <> wrote in message
    news:7GeAf.17882$...
    > "Funny KAD" <> wrote in message
    > news:dqrpkt$s7e$-infra.bt.com...
    >> Hi all,
    >> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard drive
    >> backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > Dear Funny KAD
    >
    > There are several utilities that will perform 'imaging' as in this
    > 'Google' search.
    > http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=drive imaging&btnG=Google Search&meta=
    > Opinions will vary which is 'best'.
    > Backup media varies from a partition on the same drive, external USB drive
    > thru to burning to CD R/RW or DVD R/RW.
    > Using RW disks for example can keep backup media costs down to a minimum.
    > Depending on the method chosen do allow some time for the 'image' to be
    > transfered back to the replacement drive.
    >
    > Another option to consider is to use a 'Raid' array in 'Mirror' formation
    > (Raid 1) as in this setup guide.
    > http://www.pctechguide.com/tutorials/RAID.htm
    >
    > For the releatively low hardware cost I would recomend a Raid 1 'Mirrored
    > solution if short down time is important.
    > With a suitable controller the mirroring occurs automatically and all you
    > have to do when a drive dies is to unplug the dead one, reboot to the
    > 'mirror' drive. All of 5 minutes depending on the accessability of the
    > hardware.
    > Then when the replacement drive arrives, schedule an hour or so for the
    > Raid to rebuild it'self to the new Drive (depending on drive size etc)
    > Because the system is still running this gives the opportunity to schedule
    > this restore for a suitable 'quiet time'.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Paul.
    >Sorry didnt make it very clear.

    I have a hard drive to use as a backup.
    If the master disk died , or the windos xp operating system went a bit tits
    up is there any software that would be able to peform an exact copy of my
    master drive and be bootable without having to mess about with boot disks ,
    and could back up to the slave drive without any user intervention.
    Without running a raid 1 setup.
    Funny KAD, Jan 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Funny KAD

    Toolman Tim Guest

    In news:dqrtgs$8qo$-infra.bt.com,
    Funny KAD spewed forth:
    > "PC" <> wrote in message
    > news:7GeAf.17882$...
    >> "Funny KAD" <> wrote in message
    >> news:dqrpkt$s7e$-infra.bt.com...
    >>> Hi all,
    >>> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard
    >>> drive backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the
    >>> backup .

    >> There are several utilities that will perform 'imaging' as in this
    >> 'Google' search.
    >> http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=drive imaging&btnG=Google Search&meta=
    >> Opinions will vary which is 'best'.
    >> Backup media varies from a partition on the same drive, external USB
    >> drive thru to burning to CD R/RW or DVD R/RW.
    >> Using RW disks for example can keep backup media costs down to a
    >> minimum. Depending on the method chosen do allow some time for the
    >> 'image' to be transfered back to the replacement drive.
    >>
    >> Another option to consider is to use a 'Raid' array in 'Mirror'
    >> formation (Raid 1) as in this setup guide.
    >> http://www.pctechguide.com/tutorials/RAID.htm
    >>
    >> For the releatively low hardware cost I would recomend a Raid 1
    >> 'Mirrored solution if short down time is important.
    >> With a suitable controller the mirroring occurs automatically and
    >> all you have to do when a drive dies is to unplug the dead one,
    >> reboot to the 'mirror' drive. All of 5 minutes depending on the
    >> accessability of the hardware.
    >> Then when the replacement drive arrives, schedule an hour or so for
    >> the Raid to rebuild it'self to the new Drive (depending on drive
    >> size etc) Because the system is still running this gives the
    >> opportunity to schedule this restore for a suitable 'quiet time'.

    >
    > Sorry didnt make it very clear.
    > I have a hard drive to use as a backup.
    > If the master disk died , or the windos xp operating system went a
    > bit tits up is there any software that would be able to peform an
    > exact copy of my master drive and be bootable without having to mess
    > about with boot disks , and could back up to the slave drive without
    > any user intervention. Without running a raid 1 setup.


    Nothing is going to be *that* automatic. You'll have to keep the drive
    "cloned" to your backup on a regular basis. It's possible that some drive
    image software allows "incremental" or "differential" imaging - that's only
    imaging what has changed on the master drive after the initial image is
    made. And after the initial image is made, it might be possible to schedule
    the updates on a regular (automated or semi-automated) basis.

    And if your master drive does crash, you'll have to restore from the clone
    manually.

    --
    Regardless of Public Law No. 109-162 I hereby affirm that it is
    probably my intent to annoy the reader of this post. Get over it.
    Toolman Tim, Jan 21, 2006
    #4
  5. Funny KAD

    Funny KAD Guest

    "Toolman Tim" <> wrote in message
    news:fefAf.16468$...
    > In news:dqrtgs$8qo$-infra.bt.com,
    > Funny KAD spewed forth:
    >> "PC" <> wrote in message
    >> news:7GeAf.17882$...
    >>> "Funny KAD" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:dqrpkt$s7e$-infra.bt.com...
    >>>> Hi all,
    >>>> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard
    >>>> drive backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the
    >>>> backup .
    >>> There are several utilities that will perform 'imaging' as in this
    >>> 'Google' search.
    >>> http://www.google.co.nz/search?hl=en&q=drive imaging&btnG=Google Search&meta=
    >>> Opinions will vary which is 'best'.
    >>> Backup media varies from a partition on the same drive, external USB
    >>> drive thru to burning to CD R/RW or DVD R/RW.
    >>> Using RW disks for example can keep backup media costs down to a
    >>> minimum. Depending on the method chosen do allow some time for the
    >>> 'image' to be transfered back to the replacement drive.
    >>>
    >>> Another option to consider is to use a 'Raid' array in 'Mirror'
    >>> formation (Raid 1) as in this setup guide.
    >>> http://www.pctechguide.com/tutorials/RAID.htm
    >>>
    >>> For the releatively low hardware cost I would recomend a Raid 1
    >>> 'Mirrored solution if short down time is important.
    >>> With a suitable controller the mirroring occurs automatically and
    >>> all you have to do when a drive dies is to unplug the dead one,
    >>> reboot to the 'mirror' drive. All of 5 minutes depending on the
    >>> accessability of the hardware.
    >>> Then when the replacement drive arrives, schedule an hour or so for
    >>> the Raid to rebuild it'self to the new Drive (depending on drive
    >>> size etc) Because the system is still running this gives the
    >>> opportunity to schedule this restore for a suitable 'quiet time'.

    >>
    >> Sorry didnt make it very clear.
    >> I have a hard drive to use as a backup.
    >> If the master disk died , or the windos xp operating system went a
    >> bit tits up is there any software that would be able to peform an
    >> exact copy of my master drive and be bootable without having to mess
    >> about with boot disks , and could back up to the slave drive without
    >> any user intervention. Without running a raid 1 setup.

    >
    > Nothing is going to be *that* automatic. You'll have to keep the drive
    > "cloned" to your backup on a regular basis. It's possible that some drive
    > image software allows "incremental" or "differential" imaging - that's
    > only imaging what has changed on the master drive after the initial image
    > is made. And after the initial image is made, it might be possible to
    > schedule the updates on a regular (automated or semi-automated) basis.
    >
    > And if your master drive does crash, you'll have to restore from the clone
    > manually.
    > Thanks tim.

    Got the message loud and clear.
    What program would you reccomend for incremntal backups.
    Funny KAD, Jan 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Funny KAD

    PC Guest

    "Funny KAD" <> wrote in message
    news:dqrtgs$8qo$-infra.bt.com...

    Snip


    > I have a hard drive to use as a backup.
    > If the master disk died , or the windos xp operating system went a bit
    > tits up is there any software that would be able to peform an exact copy
    > of my master drive and be bootable without having to mess about with boot
    > disks , and could back up to the slave drive without any user
    > intervention.
    > Without running a raid 1 setup.


    If your 'backup' disk is mounted in the PC as (say) D: drive then the
    freeware program XXCopy http://www.xxcopy.com/index.htm could probably be
    scheduled to run at a quiet time and 'image' your C: drive to D: drive.
    XXCopy has a /clone switch that should make this quite easy.

    Alternatively you could try scheduling a small batch file using the
    following built in Xp 'Xcopy' routine.
    "xcopy c:*.* d:./e/c/h/r/k"
    I use this particular one to 'clone' drives when replacing small with larger
    drives etc.

    Which ever scheme you use do be aware that the different Disk ID assigned to
    the backup drive by the partition format process may be enough to trigger
    XP's 'Activation' wizard.
    In this case when you change over to the backup drive you may have to go
    online and reactivate XP.

    Cheers
    Paul.
    PC, Jan 21, 2006
    #6
  7. Funny KAD

    PC Guest

    "PC" <> wrote in message
    news:DofAf.17900$...
    > "Funny KAD" <> wrote in message
    > news:dqrtgs$8qo$-infra.bt.com...
    >
    > Snip
    >
    >
    >> I have a hard drive to use as a backup.
    >> If the master disk died , or the windos xp operating system went a bit
    >> tits up is there any software that would be able to peform an exact copy
    >> of my master drive and be bootable without having to mess about with boot
    >> disks , and could back up to the slave drive without any user
    >> intervention.
    >> Without running a raid 1 setup.

    >
    > If your 'backup' disk is mounted in the PC as (say) D: drive then the
    > freeware program XXCopy http://www.xxcopy.com/index.htm could probably be
    > scheduled to run at a quiet time and 'image' your C: drive to D: drive.
    > XXCopy has a /clone switch that should make this quite easy.
    >
    > Alternatively you could try scheduling a small batch file using the
    > following built in Xp 'Xcopy' routine.
    > "xcopy c:*.* d:./e/c/h/r/k"
    > I use this particular one to 'clone' drives when replacing small with
    > larger drives etc.
    >
    > Which ever scheme you use do be aware that the different Disk ID assigned
    > to the backup drive by the partition format process may be enough to
    > trigger XP's 'Activation' wizard.
    > In this case when you change over to the backup drive you may have to go
    > online and reactivate XP.
    >
    > Cheers
    > Paul.
    >
    >
    >


    Funny KAD

    I've just read up the manual on my copy of Acronis 'Disk Image' and they
    have the following to say.
    [My comments/paraphrase in square brackets like this]
    <quote>
    Partition or disk restoration from an image is a more complex procedure than
    storing. When you store a partition, you can do it directly under Windows or
    from a bootable CD. But your system is assumed inoperable in general.
    [Part of your system is trashed]
    If your data partition files are corrupt, you'll be able to restore the
    partition
    with Acronis TrueImage Deluxe directly under Windows.
    [This assumes you can still boot into Windows and it's only data that's
    trashed]

    However, if your system or a system partition (usually the primary one) is
    damaged, [eg Drive dies] it gets more complex. In this situation there's
    only way to restore
    everything: booting from a diskette, created with Acronis TrueImage Deluxe,
    or from a bootable CD with Acronis TrueImage Deluxe.

    You can run Acronis TrueImage Deluxe from a CD [Bootable CD, they have a
    wizard that guides you thru it] and then replace a
    bootable disk with an archive file CD, containing the image of a partition
    to
    be restored. But an archive file can be possibly stored on a special back-up
    hard disk. In this case you'll have to connect it to PC.
    There's a simple rule: do not store archive files with partition images on
    the
    same hard disk you create back-up copies of. As in case of filing structures
    (for example, Partition Table) damage, you'll just not be able to access
    these
    images!
    So, the main thing for partition restoration is the availability of a
    bootable media
    (a diskette or CD), created with Acronis TrueImage Deluxe, and also the
    access
    to an archive file with a partition image (on a hard disk or removable
    media).
    After you ran [run] the software from a [their Bootable] diskette or a CD
    and got to Acronis
    TrueImage Deluxe welcome window, the further steps should not be of any
    difficulty to you.

    </quote>

    As you can see this program creates an 'archive' file and needs the parent
    software to restore.
    Other imaging programs will work in a similar manner. (caveat, I've not used
    Ghost etc, only Drive Image)
    Hence my suggestion to try the XXCopy or Xcopy solutions.

    It basically comes down to how 'fresh' you want your backup to be.
    * Up to the minute: you have to use Raid Mirroring.
    * A few hours: Schedule 'Imaging' software to suit. Penalty: poor
    performance during backup = no good for hard working servers/video
    rendering/graphics editing etc.
    * A Day: Schedule 'Imaging software' to run overnight. No performance hit,
    penalty = days work to recreate.

    Cheers
    Paul.
    PC, Jan 21, 2006
    #7
  8. Funny KAD

    dadiOH Guest

    Funny KAD wrote:
    >> And if your master drive does crash, you'll have to restore from the
    >> clone manually.
    >> Thanks tim.


    > Got the message loud and clear.
    > What program would you reccomend for incremntal backups.


    Karen's Replicator. Either full or incremental. You can set a schedule
    for backups. You will need to have made the backup drive bootable
    yourself.
    http://www.karenware.com/powertools/powertools.asp

    --
    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
    dadiOH, Jan 21, 2006
    #8
  9. Funny KAD

    Meat Plow Guest

    On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 22:53:17 +0000, Funny KAD wrote:

    > Hi all,
    > Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard drive
    > backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .


    Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    to the end user.
    Meat Plow, Jan 21, 2006
    #9
  10. Funny KAD

    Guest

    > Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    > to the end user.


    RAID is fine for hardware backup, but if you accidently delete your
    important file, it's instaneously deleted from the RAID.

    A better approach is a backup solution that allows you to store
    multiple generations so you can go back a week or a month, etc.
    , Jan 21, 2006
    #10
  11. Funny KAD

    CHUNTY Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >> Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    >> to the end user.

    >
    > RAID is fine for hardware backup, but if you accidently delete your
    > important file, it's instaneously deleted from the RAID.
    >
    > A better approach is a backup solution that allows you to store
    > multiple generations so you can go back a week or a month, etc.
    >Ok i have a raid controller , but if i was to invest in another drive to
    >make a raid 1 config would i have to do a fresh reload of windows to set it
    >up.
    CHUNTY, Jan 21, 2006
    #11
  12. Funny KAD

    Unome Guest

    "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    news:p...
    > On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 22:53:17 +0000, Funny KAD wrote:
    >
    >> Hi all,
    >> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard drive
    >> backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .

    >
    > Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    > to the end user.



    Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.
    I've just started using it this weekend, and can't believe how good &
    easy it is to use.
    I got it on sale also bundled with Norton Internet, and a rebate coming.
    Have to say I'm very pleased with them both, and I'd recommend them...
    Unome, Jan 23, 2006
    #12
  13. Funny KAD

    *x@y* Guest

    "Unome" <> wrote in message.

    Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost

    Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v


    > "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    > news:p...
    >> On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 22:53:17 +0000, Funny KAD wrote:
    >>
    >>> Hi all,
    >>> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard drive
    >>> backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .

    >>
    >> Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    >> to the end user.

    >
    >
    > Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.
    > I've just started using it this weekend, and can't believe how good &
    > easy it is to use.
    > I got it on sale also bundled with Norton Internet, and a rebate coming.
    > Have to say I'm very pleased with them both, and I'd recommend them...




    Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    *x@y*, Jan 23, 2006
    #13
  14. Funny KAD

    Unome Guest

    >> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >> news:p...
    >>> On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 22:53:17 +0000, Funny KAD wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Hi all,
    >>>> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard
    >>>> drive
    >>>> backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .
    >>>
    >>> Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    >>> to the end user.

    >>
    >>
    >> Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.
    >> I've just started using it this weekend, and can't believe how good &
    >> easy it is to use.
    >> I got it on sale also bundled with Norton Internet, and a rebate
    >> coming.
    >> Have to say I'm very pleased with them both, and I'd recommend them...

    >
    >
    >
    > Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    >
    > I checked out the tinyurl.com pages, and I don't see how you can condemn
    > Ghost from that.

    I've always felt that most people are the authors of their own problems,
    and after reading
    some of these posts, I still think so...
    You can go to any Forum and find posts like that on any Software...
    I would suggest using the Ver.10 for Win.XP which is the latest I think.
    I'm using it and it works like a charm.
    They also included ver.3 in the package, and it states it's for Win.98
    etc.

    >
    Unome, Jan 23, 2006
    #14
  15. Funny KAD

    *x@y* Guest

    "Unome" <> wrote in message
    ..
    >>> "Meat Plow" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:p...
    >>>> On Fri, 20 Jan 2006 22:53:17 +0000, Funny KAD wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Hi all,
    >>>>> Can onyone reccomend a utility to periodaclly perform complete hard
    >>>>> drive
    >>>>> backups , so if one main drive fail you can swop it for the backup .
    >>>>
    >>>> Better done with a software / hardware RAID as it is totally transparent
    >>>> to the end user.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.
    >>> I've just started using it this weekend, and can't believe how good &
    >>> easy it is to use.
    >>> I got it on sale also bundled with Norton Internet, and a rebate
    >>> coming.
    >>> Have to say I'm very pleased with them both, and I'd recommend them...

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    >>
    >> I checked out the tinyurl.com pages, and I don't see how you can condemn
    >> Ghost from that.

    > I've always felt that most people are the authors of their own problems,
    > and after reading
    > some of these posts, I still think so...
    > You can go to any Forum and find posts like that on any Software...
    > I would suggest using the Ver.10 for Win.XP which is the latest I think.
    > I'm using it and it works like a charm.
    > They also included ver.3 in the package, and it states it's for Win.98
    > etc.


    Hello Unome,

    Agree with you,
    on "that most people are the authors of their own problems"
    There is always a reason when a software product does not
    perform properly, most of the times maybe the User, I am not
    going to give a 10 out of 10 to the Software producers on perfections.

    I have used Ghost 2003, to clone my System HD C:\
    to a removable HD: F:\, for backup purposes.
    I never had to use the backup to reinstall my System, so I cannot
    tell of what would have happened, if I had to reinstall the backup.

    The only thing I did not like about Ghost was that the Target HD, F:\
    after Cloning my System was always short of at least 1GB or more.
    I don't know if the new Version still does that, you can verify the volume
    of your Source HD, & that of the Target HD, by clicking their respective
    Properties.

    I thought it might be not fair posting only Ghost's Links,
    so here are a couple Links for the program I am trying to make it
    work for me.

    A few old ones for Acronis:
    http://tinyurl.com/7t3oc

    More for Acronis some \ 2006:
    http://tinyurl.com/axdnt

    Cheers x@y
    *x@y*, Jan 23, 2006
    #15
  16. Funny KAD

    Unome Guest


    >>>> Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.


    >>> Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    >>>
    >>> I checked out the tinyurl.com pages, and I don't see how you can
    >>> condemn Ghost from that.

    >> I've always felt that most people are the authors of their own
    >> problems, and after reading


    > Hello Unome,
    > Agree with you, on "that most people are the authors of their own
    > problems"


    > A few old ones for Acronis: http://tinyurl.com/7t3oc
    >
    > More for Acronis some \ 2006: http://tinyurl.com/axdnt
    >


    Hi...x@y I picked this up from a Ghost Tutorial on one of your Links
    above
    Sounds like good stuff. I'm going to try it...U

    Test Restore to New Hard Drive
    Altho not necessary, the *ultimate* in RELIABILITY involves a 3rd hard
    drive, which allows you to TEST-RESTORE your newly-created image. [Yes,

    you can TEST-RESTORE to your *original* system drive, but if something goes
    wrong, you're screwed.] Here's how it works: you create the image of

    your 1st hard drive (your system drive) onto your 2nd hard drive. Then,
    shutdown your system & remove the 1st, or simply disconnect the data cable.

    Install the 3rd hard drive in place of the 1st (same jumper configuration,
    partitions, etc.) and *restore* the image (stored on your 2nd drive) to the
    newlyinstalled

    3rd drive. Fire up your system & boot from your new (3rd) drive. If all goes
    well, you will sleep better knowing you can actually restore your

    system should the need arise.

    Personally, I leave this 3rd hard drive physically installed in my case.
    Only the power & data cables are disconnected. This is something I recommend
    if

    you have an extra 3.5-inch slot. (Most systems do.) Otherwise, you can keep
    that puppy stashed away in your sock drawer, or someplace safe. This

    TEST-RESTORE method is more important if you're using Norton Ghost v9.0, cuz
    the RESTORE environment of v9.0 (Restore CD) is *different* from

    the environment used to CREATE the image (normal Windows).|

    Ghost also allows you to CHECK (or "TEST") the image for integrity. This
    integrity check tells Ghost to walk thru all the steps of restoring the
    image

    without actually writing data to disk. [It takes the same amount of time as
    an actual restore.] Obviously, you would have more confidence in an image

    that passes the integrity check. But a successful integrity check is *still*
    not as reassuring as actually restoring the image to a new drive and booting

    from it, which represents the Holy Grail of back-up protection for the home
    user seeking peace-of-mind.

    It's like yanking your spare tire out of the trunk, and actually mounting it
    on your car, and then driving your car around the block. You would feel
    better,

    knowing everything will work should a real situation arise. In the process,
    you might discover a problem that might prevent you from doing this in a
    *real*

    emergency (e.g. the spare is flat, you don't have a lug wrench, somebody
    stole the jack, etc.).

    Your decision to use a 3rd disk depends on how much you value the data
    contained on your system disk, and how adversely it would affect you to lose

    your system drive. The only downside of this method is the co$t of the 3rd
    drive. But, as you know, hard drives are pretty cheap these days.
    Personally,

    I feel the cost is well worth the peace-of-mind it buys. And you don't need
    the best/fastest drive for your emergency back-up (standby) drive. Pretty
    much

    anything will do.

    Admittedly, my standby-drive strategy represents an extreme approach. But if
    your system drive *did* die, my method would have you back up &

    running in 30 minutes (and that includes a coffee break while the image
    restores).
    Unome, Jan 24, 2006
    #16
  17. Funny KAD

    *x@y* Guest

    "Unome" <> wrote in message ..
    >
    >>>>> Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.

    >
    >>>> Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    >>>>
    >>>> I checked out the tinyurl.com pages, and I don't see how you can
    >>>> condemn Ghost from that.
    >>> I've always felt that most people are the authors of their own
    >>> problems, and after reading

    >
    >> Hello Unome,
    >> Agree with you, on "that most people are the authors of their own
    >> problems"

    >
    >> A few old ones for Acronis: http://tinyurl.com/7t3oc
    >>
    >> More for Acronis some \ 2006: http://tinyurl.com/axdnt
    >>

    >
    > Hi...x@y I picked this up from a Ghost Tutorial on one of your Links
    > above
    > Sounds like good stuff. I'm going to try it...U
    >
    > Test Restore to New Hard Drive
    > Altho not necessary, the *ultimate* in RELIABILITY involves a 3rd hard
    > drive, which allows you to TEST-RESTORE your newly-created image. [Yes,
    >
    > you can TEST-RESTORE to your *original* system drive, but if something goes
    > wrong, you're screwed.] Here's how it works: you create the image of
    >
    > your 1st hard drive (your system drive) onto your 2nd hard drive. Then,
    > shutdown your system & remove the 1st, or simply disconnect the data cable.
    >
    > Install the 3rd hard drive in place of the 1st (same jumper configuration,
    > partitions, etc.) and *restore* the image (stored on your 2nd drive) to the
    > newlyinstalled
    >
    > 3rd drive. Fire up your system & boot from your new (3rd) drive. If all goes
    > well, you will sleep better knowing you can actually restore your
    >
    > system should the need arise.
    >
    > Personally, I leave this 3rd hard drive physically installed in my case.
    > Only the power & data cables are disconnected. This is something I recommend
    > if
    >
    > you have an extra 3.5-inch slot. (Most systems do.) Otherwise, you can keep
    > that puppy stashed away in your sock drawer, or someplace safe. This
    >
    > TEST-RESTORE method is more important if you're using Norton Ghost v9.0, cuz
    > the RESTORE environment of v9.0 (Restore CD) is *different* from
    >
    > the environment used to CREATE the image (normal Windows).|
    >
    > Ghost also allows you to CHECK (or "TEST") the image for integrity. This
    > integrity check tells Ghost to walk thru all the steps of restoring the
    > image
    >
    > without actually writing data to disk. [It takes the same amount of time as
    > an actual restore.] Obviously, you would have more confidence in an image
    >
    > that passes the integrity check. But a successful integrity check is *still*
    > not as reassuring as actually restoring the image to a new drive and booting
    >
    > from it, which represents the Holy Grail of back-up protection for the home
    > user seeking peace-of-mind.
    >
    > It's like yanking your spare tire out of the trunk, and actually mounting it
    > on your car, and then driving your car around the block. You would feel
    > better,
    >
    > knowing everything will work should a real situation arise. In the process,
    > you might discover a problem that might prevent you from doing this in a
    > *real*
    >
    > emergency (e.g. the spare is flat, you don't have a lug wrench, somebody
    > stole the jack, etc.).
    >
    > Your decision to use a 3rd disk depends on how much you value the data
    > contained on your system disk, and how adversely it would affect you to lose
    >
    > your system drive. The only downside of this method is the co$t of the 3rd
    > drive. But, as you know, hard drives are pretty cheap these days.
    > Personally,
    >
    > I feel the cost is well worth the peace-of-mind it buys. And you don't need
    > the best/fastest drive for your emergency back-up (standby) drive. Pretty
    > much
    >
    > anything will do.
    >
    > Admittedly, my standby-drive strategy represents an extreme approach. But if
    > your system drive *did* die, my method would have you back up &
    >
    > running in 30 minutes (and that includes a coffee break while the image
    > restores).


    Hello Unome,

    In the near future I am planning an upgrade on my present System.
    I will have 3 hard drives total, I have one 40GB removable HD installed
    on my present System, on my Upgrade I will add two more, one internal
    and two removable, with trays. The reason for this is for testing like you have
    suggested above without connecting & disconnecting cables every time
    you make a backup, I will have a Computer tech configuring for drive,
    C:\, D:\ & F:\ It will cost a little more for the trays but in a long run I
    should have peace of mind.

    What do You think will It work?
    If does I have given my secret out.

    x@y
    *x@y*, Jan 24, 2006
    #17
  18. Funny KAD

    Unome Guest

    "*x@y*" <> wrote in message
    news:wAwBf.158$...
    >
    > "Unome" <> wrote in message ..
    >>
    >>>>>> Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.

    >>
    >>>>> Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    >>>>>
    >>>>> I checked out the tinyurl.com pages, and I don't see how you can
    >>>>> condemn Ghost from that.
    >>>> I've always felt that most people are the authors of their own
    >>>> problems, and after reading

    >>
    >>> Hello Unome,
    >>> Agree with you, on "that most people are the authors of their own
    >>> problems"

    >>
    >>> A few old ones for Acronis: http://tinyurl.com/7t3oc
    >>>
    >>> More for Acronis some \ 2006: http://tinyurl.com/axdnt
    >>>

    >>
    >> Hi...x@y I picked this up from a Ghost Tutorial on one of your Links
    >> above
    >> Sounds like good stuff. I'm going to try it...U
    >>
    >> Test Restore to New Hard Drive
    >> Altho not necessary, the *ultimate* in RELIABILITY involves a 3rd hard
    >> drive, which allows you to TEST-RESTORE your newly-created image. [Yes,
    >>
    >> you can TEST-RESTORE to your *original* system drive, but if something
    >> goes wrong, you're screwed.] Here's how it works: you create the image of
    >>
    >> your 1st hard drive (your system drive) onto your 2nd hard drive. Then,
    >> shutdown your system & remove the 1st, or simply disconnect the data
    >> cable.
    >>
    >> Install the 3rd hard drive in place of the 1st (same jumper
    >> configuration, partitions, etc.) and *restore* the image (stored on your
    >> 2nd drive) to the newlyinstalled
    >>
    >> 3rd drive. Fire up your system & boot from your new (3rd) drive. If all
    >> goes well, you will sleep better knowing you can actually restore your
    >>
    >> system should the need arise.
    >>
    >> Personally, I leave this 3rd hard drive physically installed in my case.
    >> Only the power & data cables are disconnected. This is something I
    >> recommend if
    >>
    >> you have an extra 3.5-inch slot. (Most systems do.) Otherwise, you can
    >> keep that puppy stashed away in your sock drawer, or someplace safe. This
    >>
    >> TEST-RESTORE method is more important if you're using Norton Ghost v9.0,
    >> cuz the RESTORE environment of v9.0 (Restore CD) is *different* from
    >>
    >> the environment used to CREATE the image (normal Windows).|
    >>
    >> Ghost also allows you to CHECK (or "TEST") the image for integrity. This
    >> integrity check tells Ghost to walk thru all the steps of restoring the
    >> image
    >>
    >> without actually writing data to disk. [It takes the same amount of time
    >> as an actual restore.] Obviously, you would have more confidence in an
    >> image
    >>
    >> that passes the integrity check. But a successful integrity check is
    >> *still* not as reassuring as actually restoring the image to a new drive
    >> and booting
    >>
    >> from it, which represents the Holy Grail of back-up protection for the
    >> home user seeking peace-of-mind.
    >>
    >> It's like yanking your spare tire out of the trunk, and actually mounting
    >> it on your car, and then driving your car around the block. You would
    >> feel better,
    >>
    >> knowing everything will work should a real situation arise. In the
    >> process, you might discover a problem that might prevent you from doing
    >> this in a *real*
    >>
    >> emergency (e.g. the spare is flat, you don't have a lug wrench, somebody
    >> stole the jack, etc.).
    >>
    >> Your decision to use a 3rd disk depends on how much you value the data
    >> contained on your system disk, and how adversely it would affect you to
    >> lose
    >>
    >> your system drive. The only downside of this method is the co$t of the
    >> 3rd drive. But, as you know, hard drives are pretty cheap these days.
    >> Personally,
    >>
    >> I feel the cost is well worth the peace-of-mind it buys. And you don't
    >> need the best/fastest drive for your emergency back-up (standby) drive.
    >> Pretty much
    >>
    >> anything will do.
    >>
    >> Admittedly, my standby-drive strategy represents an extreme approach. But
    >> if your system drive *did* die, my method would have you back up &
    >>
    >> running in 30 minutes (and that includes a coffee break while the image
    >> restores).

    >
    > Hello Unome,
    >
    > In the near future I am planning an upgrade on my present System.
    > I will have 3 hard drives total, I have one 40GB removable HD installed
    > on my present System, on my Upgrade I will add two more, one internal
    > and two removable, with trays. The reason for this is for testing like you
    > have suggested above without connecting & disconnecting cables every time
    > you make a backup, I will have a Computer tech configuring for drive,
    > C:\, D:\ & F:\ It will cost a little more for the trays but in a long
    > run I
    > should have peace of mind.
    > What do You think will It work?
    > If does I have given my secret out.



    Hi there x@y... Sounds like a good plan to to me.
    I'm really not that conversant on all of this yet, but I'm starting to
    understand it more all the time.
    This is the first time I have used Ghost, but I do like it and think
    it's a good thing.
    I'd hate to go back to Square one, in the event of a crash.
    At present I have a 120gb hdd that came in the M/C that's my C:drive.\
    This one has two Partitions on it, D:\ which holds all the restore
    files. Being an HP Pavilion.
    and G:\ all my music and Clipart.
    I added a 60gb hdd for Video editing, and just bought a 250gb USB hdd
    for back-up purposes.
    I put three partitions on this one. The smallest, M:\ for the C: Image,
    then N:\ & O:\ for other stuff.
    I know I have way too much storage, but what the heck.... U
    Unome, Jan 25, 2006
    #18
  19. Funny KAD

    *x@y* Guest

    "Unome" <> wrote in message
    ...
    >
    > "*x@y*" <> wrote in message
    > news:wAwBf.158$...
    >>
    >> "Unome" <> wrote in message ..
    >>>
    >>>>>>> Can't believe no one has suggested Norton Ghost.
    >>>
    >>>>>> Here is one reason why: http://tinyurl.com/9xq9v
    >>>>>>
    >>>>>> I checked out the tinyurl.com pages, and I don't see how you can
    >>>>>> condemn Ghost from that.
    >>>>> I've always felt that most people are the authors of their own
    >>>>> problems, and after reading
    >>>
    >>>> Hello Unome,
    >>>> Agree with you, on "that most people are the authors of their own
    >>>> problems"
    >>>
    >>>> A few old ones for Acronis: http://tinyurl.com/7t3oc
    >>>>
    >>>> More for Acronis some \ 2006: http://tinyurl.com/axdnt
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>> Hi...x@y I picked this up from a Ghost Tutorial on one of your Links
    >>> above
    >>> Sounds like good stuff. I'm going to try it...U
    >>>
    >>> Test Restore to New Hard Drive
    >>> Altho not necessary, the *ultimate* in RELIABILITY involves a 3rd hard
    >>> drive, which allows you to TEST-RESTORE your newly-created image. [Yes,
    >>>
    >>> you can TEST-RESTORE to your *original* system drive, but if something
    >>> goes wrong, you're screwed.] Here's how it works: you create the image of
    >>>
    >>> your 1st hard drive (your system drive) onto your 2nd hard drive. Then,
    >>> shutdown your system & remove the 1st, or simply disconnect the data
    >>> cable.
    >>>
    >>> Install the 3rd hard drive in place of the 1st (same jumper
    >>> configuration, partitions, etc.) and *restore* the image (stored on your
    >>> 2nd drive) to the newlyinstalled
    >>>
    >>> 3rd drive. Fire up your system & boot from your new (3rd) drive. If all
    >>> goes well, you will sleep better knowing you can actually restore your
    >>>
    >>> system should the need arise.
    >>>
    >>> Personally, I leave this 3rd hard drive physically installed in my case.
    >>> Only the power & data cables are disconnected. This is something I
    >>> recommend if
    >>>
    >>> you have an extra 3.5-inch slot. (Most systems do.) Otherwise, you can
    >>> keep that puppy stashed away in your sock drawer, or someplace safe. This
    >>>
    >>> TEST-RESTORE method is more important if you're using Norton Ghost v9.0,
    >>> cuz the RESTORE environment of v9.0 (Restore CD) is *different* from
    >>>
    >>> the environment used to CREATE the image (normal Windows).|
    >>>
    >>> Ghost also allows you to CHECK (or "TEST") the image for integrity. This
    >>> integrity check tells Ghost to walk thru all the steps of restoring the
    >>> image
    >>>
    >>> without actually writing data to disk. [It takes the same amount of time
    >>> as an actual restore.] Obviously, you would have more confidence in an
    >>> image
    >>>
    >>> that passes the integrity check. But a successful integrity check is
    >>> *still* not as reassuring as actually restoring the image to a new drive
    >>> and booting
    >>>
    >>> from it, which represents the Holy Grail of back-up protection for the
    >>> home user seeking peace-of-mind.
    >>>
    >>> It's like yanking your spare tire out of the trunk, and actually mounting
    >>> it on your car, and then driving your car around the block. You would
    >>> feel better,
    >>>
    >>> knowing everything will work should a real situation arise. In the
    >>> process, you might discover a problem that might prevent you from doing
    >>> this in a *real*
    >>>
    >>> emergency (e.g. the spare is flat, you don't have a lug wrench, somebody
    >>> stole the jack, etc.).
    >>>
    >>> Your decision to use a 3rd disk depends on how much you value the data
    >>> contained on your system disk, and how adversely it would affect you to
    >>> lose
    >>>
    >>> your system drive. The only downside of this method is the co$t of the
    >>> 3rd drive. But, as you know, hard drives are pretty cheap these days.
    >>> Personally,
    >>>
    >>> I feel the cost is well worth the peace-of-mind it buys. And you don't
    >>> need the best/fastest drive for your emergency back-up (standby) drive.
    >>> Pretty much
    >>>
    >>> anything will do.
    >>>
    >>> Admittedly, my standby-drive strategy represents an extreme approach. But
    >>> if your system drive *did* die, my method would have you back up &
    >>>
    >>> running in 30 minutes (and that includes a coffee break while the image
    >>> restores).

    >>
    >> Hello Unome,
    >>
    >> In the near future I am planning an upgrade on my present System.
    >> I will have 3 hard drives total, I have one 40GB removable HD installed
    >> on my present System, on my Upgrade I will add two more, one internal
    >> and two removable, with trays. The reason for this is for testing like you
    >> have suggested above without connecting & disconnecting cables every time
    >> you make a backup, I will have a Computer tech configuring for drive,
    >> C:\, D:\ & F:\ It will cost a little more for the trays but in a long
    >> run I
    >> should have peace of mind.
    >> What do You think will It work?
    >> If does I have given my secret out.

    >
    >
    > Hi there x@y... Sounds like a good plan to to me.
    > I'm really not that conversant on all of this yet, but I'm starting to
    > understand it more all the time.


    > This is the first time I have used Ghost, but I do like it and think
    > it's a good thing.


    My advice to You: If Ghost is doing its job for You, and You are
    satisfied with the program. Don't pay attention to what People say,
    about the product.

    > I'd hate to go back to Square one, in the event of a crash.


    Me too: Lets touch Wood!


    > At present I have a 120gb hdd that came in the M/C that's my C:drive.\
    > This one has two Partitions on it, D:\ which holds all the restore
    > files. Being an HP Pavilion.
    > and G:\ all my music and Clipart.
    > I added a 60gb hdd for Video editing, and just bought a 250gb USB hdd
    > for back-up purposes.
    > I put three partitions on this one. The smallest, M:\ for the C: Image,
    > then N:\ & O:\ for other stuff.
    > I know I have way too much storage, but what the heck.... U


    Hello Unome,

    Congratulations!

    You have a very nice set-up, I am sure Ghost will work well for You.
    Now is my turn to Upgrade my Puter, I will not require so many
    partitions, as I am not involved with any Video Editing, burning music
    or Video, all I am going to have one extra HHD to test my backups.

    As discussed earlier, we want to assure ourselves that the backups
    are not corrupted and will reinstall flawless on our C:\, System HHD.

    Thanks for sharing, x@y
    *x@y*, Jan 26, 2006
    #19
  20. Funny KAD

    Guest

    Greetings,

    The way I see it, the great tool to use in this situation is Disk
    Image. It can backup your whole drive data to an image, in order to
    restore later. That helped me before, so you can really rely on it.
    This tool is included into a mighty package of data tools, Active@ Boot
    Disk. You can really try it out.

    http://www.ntfs.com/boot-disk.htm
    , Feb 1, 2006
    #20
    1. Advertising

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