Hard Disk Recovery

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Mike, Dec 2, 2006.

  1. Mike

    Mike Guest

    If I had two HDD of the same make and model, could I swap the hard disks
    without loosing all the data on that disk ? I litterally mean take the disk
    out of the drive and fit it into the other drive.
     
    Mike, Dec 2, 2006
    #1
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  2. Mike

    Jerry Attic Guest

    "Mike" <> said in
    news::

    >
    > If I had two HDD of the same make and model, could I swap the hard
    > disks without loosing all the data on that disk ? I litterally mean
    > take the disk out of the drive and fit it into the other drive.


    No, because these hard drives sre made under such tight technical specs
    that removing the disk(s) from the hard drive casing would destroy it.
    That's why it's so expensive to recover data from a hard drive that's gone
    tits up. You have to do it under clean room conditions and have special
    hard ware to do it.
     
    Jerry Attic, Dec 2, 2006
    #2
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  3. Mike

    B.B. Bawles Guest

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > If I had two HDD of the same make and model, could I swap the hard disks
    > without loosing all the data on that disk ? I litterally mean take the
    > disk
    > out of the drive and fit it into the other drive.
    >
    >
    >
    >


    Just data - secondary drive or further down, switch to anywhere, yes. If
    having OS, switching around in same system or to another machine, no - not
    without further working on it.
     
    B.B. Bawles, Dec 2, 2006
    #3
  4. Mike wrote:

    >
    > If I had two HDD of the same make and model, could I swap the hard disks
    > without loosing all the data on that disk ? I litterally mean take the
    > disk out of the drive and fit it into the other drive.


    You mean taking out the plattern(s)?
    Unfortunately no chance - you would have to engage a data rescue business
    with cleanroom labs and all the equipment.
    Sometimes if just the electronics on your drive gone bad, there is a chance
    to exchange that one without opening the sealed plattern cage.
    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse found penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.17-mm1,Xorg7.1/nvidia [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Dec 2, 2006
    #4
  5. Mike

    Mike Guest

    "Walter Mautner" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Mike wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > If I had two HDD of the same make and model, could I swap the hard disks
    > > without loosing all the data on that disk ? I litterally mean take the
    > > disk out of the drive and fit it into the other drive.

    >
    > You mean taking out the plattern(s)?
    > Unfortunately no chance - you would have to engage a data rescue business
    > with cleanroom labs and all the equipment.
    > Sometimes if just the electronics on your drive gone bad, there is a

    chance
    > to exchange that one without opening the sealed plattern cage.
    > --


    Thanks for all the various answers.

    So all data is stored on the plattern (I am presuming this is the name for
    the highly polished disk inside the drive) and there is no other storage of
    data, such as flash memory elsewhere within the hard drive casing.

    So theoretically, (taking care not to spill any lager or crisps within the
    casing) swapping the disks over would work providing the problem is within
    the electronics and not with the disk itself.

    When HDDs go wrong, what is the main cause, electronics or the disk?

    The reason i ask, I lost the HDD on an old machine, nothing important lost,
    however i would like to recover a couple of files that were not backed up,
    not willing to spend any real money though, £20 tops. Plenty of drives of
    same spec available on ebay for a fiver, so, is it worth a go?
     
    Mike, Dec 2, 2006
    #5
  6. Howdy!

    "Mike" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    > "Walter Mautner" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Mike wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > > If I had two HDD of the same make and model, could I swap the hard

    disks
    > > > without loosing all the data on that disk ? I litterally mean take the
    > > > disk out of the drive and fit it into the other drive.

    > >
    > > You mean taking out the plattern(s)?
    > > Unfortunately no chance - you would have to engage a data rescue

    business
    > > with cleanroom labs and all the equipment.
    > > Sometimes if just the electronics on your drive gone bad, there is a

    > chance
    > > to exchange that one without opening the sealed plattern cage.
    > > --

    >
    > Thanks for all the various answers.
    >
    > So all data is stored on the plattern (I am presuming this is the name for
    > the highly polished disk inside the drive) and there is no other storage

    of
    > data, such as flash memory elsewhere within the hard drive casing.


    That's better known as a "platter".

    And, actually, yes there is some flash memory on the electronics
    that store the info about where the bad spots are on the platters so that
    the electronics can map around them so that the computer doesn't see them.

    >
    > So theoretically, (taking care not to spill any lager or crisps within the
    > casing) swapping the disks over would work providing the problem is within
    > the electronics and not with the disk itself.


    Why do that much work? And besides, the head gap is so small - even
    just atmospheric dust and your fingerprint oil will damage the head when it
    goes whipping by.

    Can I ask a really silly question? Why not just swap the
    electronics? That's outside the HD enclosure, doesn't expose the
    mechanicals to the crap in the air, and is much easier. Plus, you don't
    have to worry about the alignment of the head to the platters to get it back
    running!

    >
    > When HDDs go wrong, what is the main cause, electronics or the disk?


    Usually? Stupid users. Past that, just age causing the platters to
    start failing.

    >
    > The reason i ask, I lost the HDD on an old machine, nothing important

    lost,
    > however i would like to recover a couple of files that were not backed up,
    > not willing to spend any real money though, £20 tops. Plenty of drives of
    > same spec available on ebay for a fiver, so, is it worth a go?


    Nope. Google sometimes for how small the head height is while
    flying in operation, and compare it to, say, a human hair. Then do the
    math - see how thick the tracks actually are, and how accurate you'd need to
    be in putting them back together.

    THAT said - if actually totally destroying that data isn't that big
    a deal, go for it! Never can learn until you try!

    RwP
     
    Ralph Wade Phillips, Dec 2, 2006
    #6
  7. Mike wrote:
    .....
    > Thanks for all the various answers.
    >
    > So all data is stored on the plattern (I am presuming this is the name for
    > the highly polished disk inside the drive) and there is no other storage
    > of data, such as flash memory elsewhere within the hard drive casing.
    >

    Harddrives with flash cache storage for faster bootup are just vaporware
    these days. Consider the limited amount of write cycles a flashmemory
    offers, that would need special precaution.
    Now, old drives for sure do not have that.

    > So theoretically, (taking care not to spill any lager or crisps within the
    > casing) swapping the disks over would work providing the problem is within
    > the electronics and not with the disk itself.
    >

    You might want to exchange the electronics board and carefully resolder the
    connections, nothing more. NEVER take the platterns out.
    You would never be able to adjust the heads in the other drive accordingly,
    after all.

    > When HDDs go wrong, what is the main cause, electronics or the disk?
    >

    Old disks: mostly mechanics, like a headcrash damaging plattern surface,
    spilling grains of whatever, damaged magnetic heads, worn-out bearings,
    spindle motor or head servo failing/misaligned ....

    > The reason i ask, I lost the HDD on an old machine, nothing important
    > lost, however i would like to recover a couple of files that were not
    > backed up, not willing to spend any real money though, £20 tops. Plenty
    > of drives of same spec available on ebay for a fiver, so, is it worth a
    > go?


    You did not tell much about the symptoms. Does the drive still spin up? Is
    it detected by the bios? Odd noise?
    Really old drives can sometimes be convinced to start up a last time by
    gently applying "percussive maintainence" just when powering up your pc.
    You should already have a 2nd drive connected and a imaging software
    (ghost ...) on floppy, so that you can image the drive when luck strikes,
    or simply copy files over.
    Not-so-old drives may still work "somehow" for a limited amount of time,
    when started, but quit after some minutes. Maybe enough time to get back
    your most important files, or try "partial imaging" with dd_rescue. Full
    random access-wise copying may destroy the drive even faster here.
    No, putting your drive in a fridge won't help very much :).
    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse found penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.17-mm1,Xorg7.1/nvidia [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Dec 2, 2006
    #7
  8. Walter Mautner wrote:
    > No, putting your drive in a fridge won't help very much :).


    I'm perfectly willing to admit that putting a drive in the fridge is
    voodoo, but that doesn't mean that voodoo doesn't sometimes work ;)

    -Jordan Greenberg

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Jordan Greenberg, Dec 2, 2006
    #8
  9. Jordan Greenberg wrote:
    > Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com


    Hey, whats this crap in my sig? They've never done that before....
    Damnit... anyone got a cheap feed they like?

    -Jordan

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Jordan Greenberg, Dec 2, 2006
    #9
  10. Jordan Greenberg wrote:

    > Jordan Greenberg wrote:
    >> Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com

    >
    > Hey, whats this crap in my sig? They've never done that before....
    > Damnit... anyone got a cheap feed they like?
    >

    Mmhm, got a bunch of free servers in my (linux) leafnode file:

    server = motzarella.org
    server = news.readfreenews.net
    # These two need registration, you receive a password via e-mail.
    server = nntp.aioe.org
    # without authentication but not always up, sometimes painfully slow

    I use them for posting (my ISP obviously has no reasonable upstream) and
    as "fills".

    --
    vista policy violation: Microsoft optical mouse found penguin patterns
    on mousepad. Partition scan in progress to remove offending
    incompatible products. Reactivate MS software.
    Linux 2.6.17-mm1,Xorg7.1/nvidia [LinuxCounter#295241,ICQ#4918962]
     
    Walter Mautner, Dec 2, 2006
    #10
  11. Walter Mautner wrote:
    > Mmhm, got a bunch of free servers in my (linux) leafnode file:
    >
    > server = motzarella.org
    > server = news.readfreenews.net
    > # These two need registration, you receive a password via e-mail.
    > server = nntp.aioe.org
    > # without authentication but not always up, sometimes painfully slow
    >
    > I use them for posting (my ISP obviously has no reasonable upstream) and
    > as "fills".
    >


    Fantastic! Teranews sucked something fierce, even before they started
    putting ads in my posts.

    Thanks!
    -Jordan Greenberg

    --
    Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com
     
    Jordan Greenberg, Dec 3, 2006
    #11
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