Handy tip for camera safety.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Matt Ion, Aug 14, 2005.

  1. Matt Ion

    Matt Ion Guest

    A lot of electronics you buy these days, including cameras, have those
    little packets of silica "rocks" in them (the baggies labeled "Do not
    eat") to absorb mositure in shipping and storage.

    I discovered it's particularly handy to keep one each compartment of my
    camera bag, especially if I have to pack it in the trunk of the car in
    wet or winter weather, or when taking the camera out in the cold and
    then bringing it back inside. It really helps to keep down the
    condensation.



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    Matt Ion, Aug 14, 2005
    #1
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  2. Matt Ion

    Andy Dee Guest

    Matt Ion wrote:

    > A lot of electronics you buy these days, including cameras, have those
    > little packets of silica "rocks" in them (the baggies labeled "Do not
    > eat") to absorb mositure in shipping and storage.
    >
    > I discovered it's particularly handy to keep one each compartment of
    > my camera bag, especially if I have to pack it in the trunk of the car
    > in wet or winter weather, or when taking the camera out in the cold
    > and then bringing it back inside. It really helps to keep down the
    > condensation.
    >

    But don't forget to dry them out in a warm oven occasionally as the
    crystals become saturated.

    A
     
    Andy Dee, Aug 14, 2005
    #2
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  3. Matt Ion

    King Sardon Guest

    On Sun, 14 Aug 2005 05:44:13 GMT, Matt Ion <>
    wrote:

    >A lot of electronics you buy these days, including cameras, have those
    >little packets of silica "rocks" in them (the baggies labeled "Do not
    >eat") to absorb mositure in shipping and storage.
    >
    >I discovered it's particularly handy to keep one each compartment of my
    >camera bag, especially if I have to pack it in the trunk of the car in
    >wet or winter weather, or when taking the camera out in the cold and
    >then bringing it back inside. It really helps to keep down the
    >condensation.


    Silica gel absorbs water from the air until its capacity is used up.
    After that, it doesn't absorb any more water and is useless.

    But you can regenerate the water-logged silica gel to restore its
    water-absorbing powers. This is done by heating it to around 150 C
    (300 F), allowing free air flow around the silica gel. Allow it to
    cool, covering it quickly so it doesn't start to absorb moisture
    again. Don't make the cover air-tight until it has fully cooled, lest
    you collapse the container.

    This regenerated stuff should be pretty effective, but you are
    probably going to need A LOT more than you expect. If your camera bag
    is reasonably well sealed, then think around 250 gram (1/2 lb) of
    silica gel per cubic foot of space. But a camera bag that is in use is
    not going to be well sealed, so much more will be needed. If the bag
    is left open to the air then the silical gel will not serve its
    intended purpose at all.

    One of those silica gel packets probably weighs 1 or 2 grams.

    Basically, silica gel is a useful desiccant in spaces that are sealed
    off from the outside, but not at all in situations where there is free
    access to air.

    Don't let any silica gel dust get into your gear.

    K.S.
     
    King Sardon, Aug 14, 2005
    #3
  4. You won't need huge amounts of silica gel. Put a few small bags in and
    there it is. One won't do a thing, a few will. They won't last too long.
    Regenerate/change them often enough.

    Avoid keeping camera bag open more than needed anyway, if you keep it
    open a lot you'll need constant changing even with huge amounts of
    silica gel!
    --
    harri
     
    Harri Suomalainen, Aug 14, 2005
    #4
  5. >> I discovered it's particularly handy to keep one each compartment of my
    >> camera bag, especially if I have to pack it in the trunk of the car in
    >> wet or winter weather, or when taking the camera out in the cold and then
    >> bringing it back inside. It really helps to keep down the condensation.
    >>

    > But don't forget to dry them out in a warm oven occasionally as the
    > crystals become saturated.
    >


    So when the crystals become saturated, you put the camera in a warm oven?

    Sorry, when I first read it, it actually thought that's what it meant... for
    about five seconds. Long day. :>)

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles
    www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
    Mike Jacoubowsky, Aug 15, 2005
    #5
  6. Matt Ion

    Tom B. Stone Guest

    and while we're on the subject...

    With winter coming along here in the northern hemisphere sooner than we'd
    like, I was thinking about using some of those chemical hand warmer packets
    in my camera bag this winter. I never bothered when I was shooting film,
    but now that I'm taking my 20D out into the elements, I got to thinking
    that the electronics within might need to be kept a little warmer when I'm
    out. I believe the batteries aren't too happy when chilled. Any thoughts?
     
    Tom B. Stone, Aug 15, 2005
    #6
  7. Matt Ion

    Brian Baird Guest

    Re: and while we're on the subject...

    In article <Xns96B2EBDDC38FDwyatterp@69.28.186.125>,
    says...
    >
    > With winter coming along here in the northern hemisphere sooner than we'd
    > like, I was thinking about using some of those chemical hand warmer packets
    > in my camera bag this winter. I never bothered when I was shooting film,
    > but now that I'm taking my 20D out into the elements, I got to thinking
    > that the electronics within might need to be kept a little warmer when I'm
    > out. I believe the batteries aren't too happy when chilled. Any thoughts?


    Keep the batteries in your pockets. The camera will work fine with the
    exception of the LCDs if they get too cold.
    --
    http://www.pbase.com/bcbaird
     
    Brian Baird, Aug 15, 2005
    #7
  8. Matt Ion

    DoN. Nichols Guest

    Re: and while we're on the subject...

    In article <>,
    Brian Baird <> wrote:
    >In article <Xns96B2EBDDC38FDwyatterp@69.28.186.125>,
    >says...
    >>
    >> With winter coming along here in the northern hemisphere sooner than we'd
    >> like, I was thinking about using some of those chemical hand warmer packets
    >> in my camera bag this winter. I never bothered when I was shooting film,
    >> but now that I'm taking my 20D out into the elements, I got to thinking
    >> that the electronics within might need to be kept a little warmer when I'm
    >> out. I believe the batteries aren't too happy when chilled. Any thoughts?

    >
    >Keep the batteries in your pockets. The camera will work fine with the
    >exception of the LCDs if they get too cold.


    When the camera is cold, I would expect lower noise at high
    ISOs -- even if the LCD is so frozen that you can't see what you got. :)

    Enjoy,
    DoN.

    --
    Email: <> | Voice (all times): (703) 938-4564
    (too) near Washington D.C. | http://www.d-and-d.com/dnichols/DoN.html
    --- Black Holes are where God is dividing by zero ---
     
    DoN. Nichols, Aug 15, 2005
    #8
  9. Matt Ion

    kz8rt3 Guest

    Re: and while we're on the subject...

    In article <Xns96B2EBDDC38FDwyatterp@69.28.186.125>,
    "Tom B. Stone" <> wrote:

    > With winter coming along here in the northern hemisphere sooner than we'd
    > like, I was thinking about using some of those chemical hand warmer packets
    > in my camera bag this winter. I never bothered when I was shooting film,
    > but now that I'm taking my 20D out into the elements, I got to thinking
    > that the electronics within might need to be kept a little warmer when I'm
    > out. I believe the batteries aren't too happy when chilled. Any thoughts?


    Get a Nikon FE.

    :^P
     
    kz8rt3, Aug 15, 2005
    #9
  10. Re: and while we're on the subject...

    I've got one. Why was this the last of the mechanical cameras?
    Paul


    kz8rt3 wrote:

    > Get a Nikon FE.
    >
    > :^P
     
    Paul Schilter, Aug 16, 2005
    #10
  11. Matt Ion

    kz8rt3 Guest

    Re: and while we're on the subject...

    In article <>,
    Paul Schilter <> wrote:

    > I've got one. Why was this the last of the mechanical cameras?
    > Paul


    No, I was just joking around. The older cameras are less delicate in the
    cold. You don't even need a battery with that camera.



    >
    > kz8rt3 wrote:
    >
    > > Get a Nikon FE.
    > >
    > > :^P
     
    kz8rt3, Aug 16, 2005
    #11
  12. Re: and while we're on the subject...

    Well I knew it was a relic. :)


    kz8rt3 wrote:
    > In article <>,
    > Paul Schilter <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I've got one. Why was this the last of the mechanical cameras?
    >>Paul

    >
    >
    > No, I was just joking around. The older cameras are less delicate in the
    > cold. You don't even need a battery with that camera.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >>kz8rt3 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Get a Nikon FE.
    >>>
    >>>:^P
     
    Paul Schilter, Aug 17, 2005
    #12
  13. Re: and while we're on the subject...

    On Tue, 16 Aug 2005 21:18:50 GMT, kz8rt3 <> wrote:

    >In article <>,
    > Paul Schilter <> wrote:
    >
    >> I've got one. Why was this the last of the mechanical cameras?
    >> Paul

    >
    >No, I was just joking around. The older cameras are less delicate in the
    >cold. You don't even need a battery with that camera.


    Actually old cameras weren't any more less delicate in extreme cold do
    to problems with lubricants and the irises of the lenses and film
    becoming brittle and the sprockets breaking.




    ********************************************************

    "A nice man is a man of nasty ideas."

    _Introductions to History of the Reformation_
    Jonathan Swift
    1667-1745
     
    John A. Stovall, Aug 17, 2005
    #13
  14. Andy Dee <> wrote:

    >But don't forget to dry them out in a warm oven occasionally as the
    >crystals become saturated.


    How warm should the oven be (in degrees) and how long should the
    desiccant be left in the oven?

    Can I use the little ones that come in my vitamin bottles? If so,
    how many should I use with my Dimage Z5? Would it be a good idea to
    keep my Z5 sealed in a plastic bag with some desiccant packets when
    I am not using it?

    Thank you in advance for all replies.
    --
    It is very hard to type with a 12 pound cat lying on
    your arms. So if there are any errors in this message
    blame them on the cat.
     
    Daniel Prince, Apr 26, 2006
    #14
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