Half - Full Duplex

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Some Guy At Work, Jul 18, 2003.

  1. Has anyone had any problems networking xp machines and forcing the use of
    10Mbps full duplex? All the nic cards can support and the switch (D-Link
    DES-1008D) I am using will also support that. I am have problems getting xp
    to see the internet gateway on the lan and certain machines, the lan is
    setup dynamically will the machine holding the gateway acting as a DHCP
    server.


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    Some Guy At Work, Jul 18, 2003
    #1
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  2. Some Guy At Work wrote:
    >
    > Has anyone had any problems networking xp machines and forcing the use of
    > 10Mbps full duplex? All the nic cards can support and the switch (D-Link
    > DES-1008D) I am using will also support that. I am have problems getting xp
    > to see the internet gateway on the lan and certain machines, the lan is
    > setup dynamically will the machine holding the gateway acting as a DHCP
    > server.


    It's best to work on only one problem at a time. I would return the
    cards to their factory defaults, which is likely to auto-detect full or
    half duplex, and do the same with the switch. Once you have it working
    that way for a little while, try forcing full duplex and see if it still
    works. Full duplex at 10 mbs is not common, indeed full duplex being
    forced is not common anywhere except perhaps between servers on a
    backbone.

    You also ask, "will the machine holding the gateway act[ing] as a DHCP
    server?" If you're asking where DHCP services will come from in your
    network, unless you've specifically configured the gateway machine to
    also run a DHCP server, it won't do that automatically. Most small
    setups I'm familiar with have their DHCP services supplied by the
    switch/router - if you do it this way you do not need one machine to be
    a gateway, just plug them all into the switch/router. Some even have
    their DHCP services supplied by the ISP - it depends on what sort of
    service you have. If your ISP thinks you have a single address, you'll
    probably find it easiest to run DHCP on your router as many even come
    configured to supply 192.168.x.x addresses (non-routable addresses,
    which is what you want from your DHCP server unless you've got a Class D
    or larger block of public address assigned to you by your ISP).

    -S-
    http://www.kbnj.com
    Steve Freides, Jul 18, 2003
    #2
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