GSM or CDMA?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Tony, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. Tony

    Tony Guest

    Tony, Jun 27, 2005
    #1
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  2. Tony wrote:
    >
    >
    > http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/151
    >
    >
    > Read for your self


    Read it. Written by a moron.

    The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it isn't
    even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with multiple
    phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming, and
    performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are easier on
    another phone. Loss of the phone or a few phone numbers isn't even
    important compared to that IMO.

    SIM card 'backup' isn't a new thing, it has been around as long as smart
    cards, only it now comes in the form of a convenient mass-produced
    gadget anyone can easily afford.

    The article fails to address issues such as spectrum use, operating
    frequencies, and how calls are handed across multiple sites. How is
    network congestion handled? How many sites do you need to service x
    users? etc.

    So the latest revision of CDMA may offer higher theoretical throughput
    for data, but what else has CDMA actually added that GSM didn't have (or
    have provisions for) a decade ago?

    For phone calls, which surprisingly enough is what I use my phone for,
    GSM still offers the best performance and most flexibility.

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Jun 27, 2005
    #2
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  3. Tony

    Mutlley Guest

    The Other Guy <> wrote:

    >Tony wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >> http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/151
    >>
    >>
    >> Read for your self

    >
    >Read it. Written by a moron.
    >
    >The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it isn't
    >even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with multiple
    >phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming, and
    >performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are easier on
    >another phone. Loss of the phone or a few phone numbers isn't even
    >important compared to that IMO.
    >
    >SIM card 'backup' isn't a new thing, it has been around as long as smart
    >cards, only it now comes in the form of a convenient mass-produced
    >gadget anyone can easily afford.
    >
    >The article fails to address issues such as spectrum use, operating
    >frequencies, and how calls are handed across multiple sites. How is
    >network congestion handled? How many sites do you need to service x
    >users? etc.
    >
    >So the latest revision of CDMA may offer higher theoretical throughput
    >for data, but what else has CDMA actually added that GSM didn't have (or
    >have provisions for) a decade ago?
    >
    >For phone calls, which surprisingly enough is what I use my phone for,
    >GSM still offers the best performance and most flexibility.
    >
    >The Other Guy


    I prefer the CDMA technology over GSM . However until Telecom starts
    to sell phones with R-UIM cards which is the CDMA version of the GSM
    SIM card I will stay with my GSM phone. I've been thru 4 in the past 5
    years. Just change the SIM and the new one is up and going..

    I suspect that the reason that TCNZ does not buy phones with R-IUM
    cards is to stop parallel imports of phones under cutting their
    monopoly for sales..
    Mutlley, Jun 27, 2005
    #3
  4. Tony

    jedmeister Guest

    "Mutlley" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > The Other Guy <> wrote:
    >
    >>Tony wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/151
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Read for your self

    >>
    >>Read it. Written by a moron.
    >>
    >>The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it isn't
    >>even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with multiple
    >>phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming, and
    >>performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are easier on
    >>another phone. Loss of the phone or a few phone numbers isn't even
    >>important compared to that IMO.
    >>
    >>SIM card 'backup' isn't a new thing, it has been around as long as smart
    >>cards, only it now comes in the form of a convenient mass-produced
    >>gadget anyone can easily afford.
    >>
    >>The article fails to address issues such as spectrum use, operating
    >>frequencies, and how calls are handed across multiple sites. How is
    >>network congestion handled? How many sites do you need to service x
    >>users? etc.
    >>
    >>So the latest revision of CDMA may offer higher theoretical throughput
    >>for data, but what else has CDMA actually added that GSM didn't have (or
    >>have provisions for) a decade ago?
    >>
    >>For phone calls, which surprisingly enough is what I use my phone for,
    >>GSM still offers the best performance and most flexibility.
    >>
    >>The Other Guy

    >
    > I prefer the CDMA technology over GSM . However until Telecom starts
    > to sell phones with R-UIM cards which is the CDMA version of the GSM
    > SIM card I will stay with my GSM phone. I've been thru 4 in the past 5
    > years. Just change the SIM and the new one is up and going..
    >
    > I suspect that the reason that TCNZ does not buy phones with R-IUM
    > cards is to stop parallel imports of phones under cutting their
    > monopoly for sales..
    >


    GSM will generally be behind in technology simply due to their market share
    and standards adherence. Developing a set of unified standards for 70% of
    the world market is a rather large monkey on the backs of the GSM
    association.

    New GSM services need to be supported 'world-wide' and the roaming
    infrastructure also supports the necessary services. The roaming also needs
    to be totally backward compatible.

    CDMA is a piece of cake, they don't care about roaming and as long is the
    service works on the incumbents network , no worries. Roaming is an after
    thought for the cdma guys whereas for GSM it is integral to the product.
    jedmeister, Jun 27, 2005
    #4
  5. Tony

    Mutlley Guest

    "jedmeister" <> wrote:

    >"Mutlley" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> The Other Guy <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Tony wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/article/151
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> Read for your self
    >>>
    >>>Read it. Written by a moron.
    >>>
    >>>The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it isn't
    >>>even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with multiple
    >>>phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming, and
    >>>performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are easier on
    >>>another phone. Loss of the phone or a few phone numbers isn't even
    >>>important compared to that IMO.
    >>>
    >>>SIM card 'backup' isn't a new thing, it has been around as long as smart
    >>>cards, only it now comes in the form of a convenient mass-produced
    >>>gadget anyone can easily afford.
    >>>
    >>>The article fails to address issues such as spectrum use, operating
    >>>frequencies, and how calls are handed across multiple sites. How is
    >>>network congestion handled? How many sites do you need to service x
    >>>users? etc.
    >>>
    >>>So the latest revision of CDMA may offer higher theoretical throughput
    >>>for data, but what else has CDMA actually added that GSM didn't have (or
    >>>have provisions for) a decade ago?
    >>>
    >>>For phone calls, which surprisingly enough is what I use my phone for,
    >>>GSM still offers the best performance and most flexibility.
    >>>
    >>>The Other Guy

    >>
    >> I prefer the CDMA technology over GSM . However until Telecom starts
    >> to sell phones with R-UIM cards which is the CDMA version of the GSM
    >> SIM card I will stay with my GSM phone. I've been thru 4 in the past 5
    >> years. Just change the SIM and the new one is up and going..
    >>
    >> I suspect that the reason that TCNZ does not buy phones with R-IUM
    >> cards is to stop parallel imports of phones under cutting their
    >> monopoly for sales..
    >>

    >
    >GSM will generally be behind in technology simply due to their market share
    >and standards adherence. Developing a set of unified standards for 70% of
    >the world market is a rather large monkey on the backs of the GSM
    >association.
    >
    >New GSM services need to be supported 'world-wide' and the roaming
    >infrastructure also supports the necessary services. The roaming also needs
    >to be totally backward compatible.
    >
    >CDMA is a piece of cake, they don't care about roaming and as long is the
    >service works on the incumbents network , no worries. Roaming is an after
    >thought for the cdma guys whereas for GSM it is integral to the product.
    >


    CDMA roaming is currently supported not too well known.

    http://www.cdg.org/technology/roaming/coverage.asp
    Mutlley, Jun 28, 2005
    #5
  6. Tony

    Richard Guest

    The Other Guy wrote:

    > The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it isn't
    > even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with multiple
    > phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming, and
    > performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are easier on
    > another phone. Loss of the phone or a few phone numbers isn't even
    > important compared to that IMO.


    Sims are a pain in the ass. Its another cost to get on the vodafone network that
    telecom dont have, And they dont really hold enough to be usefull, most phones
    prefer to use there own address book and memory for sms's since the sim holds so
    little and doesnt support multiple numbers/addresses per contact.

    With outlook sync I dont think being able to simply swap sims between phones is
    a huge advantage. I would like the ability to swap ESN on my 027 without calling
    telecom and having to wait however.
    Richard, Jun 28, 2005
    #6
  7. Tony

    PAM. Guest

    "Richard" <> wrote in message

    > Sims are a pain in the ass. Its another cost to get on the vodafone

    network that
    > telecom dont have, And they dont really hold enough to be usefull, most

    phones
    > prefer to use there own address book and memory for sms's since the sim

    holds so
    > little and doesnt support multiple numbers/addresses per contact.
    >
    > With outlook sync I dont think being able to simply swap sims between

    phones is
    > a huge advantage. I would like the ability to swap ESN on my 027 without

    calling
    > telecom and having to wait however.


    My SIM card holds nothing. My phone cannot hold anything :)
    The good thing about having a crappy phone is that I can accidentally leave
    mine in the toilets where I work where students also frequent and I know
    that the phone won't be nicked....like I did last thursday.
    They can't even use the phone as it has no keyboard lock which means in
    order to not accidentally phone some number, I have to leave it on a phone
    lock (4 digit pin).
    They could however take the SIM out and put it in another phone and use up
    all of my measily account credit.

    PAM.
    PAM., Jun 28, 2005
    #7
  8. Tony

    Tony Guest

    On Tue, 28 Jun 2005 13:11:40 +1200, Richard <> wrote:

    >The Other Guy wrote:
    >
    >> The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it isn't
    >> even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with multiple
    >> phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming, and
    >> performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are easier on
    >> another phone. Loss of the phone or a few phone numbers isn't even
    >> important compared to that IMO.

    >
    >Sims are a pain in the ass. Its another cost to get on the vodafone network that
    >telecom dont have, And they dont really hold enough to be usefull, most phones
    >prefer to use there own address book and memory for sms's since the sim holds so
    >little and doesnt support multiple numbers/addresses per contact.




    Funny my old Siemens does..


    >With outlook sync I dont think being able to simply swap sims between phones is
    >a huge advantage. I would like the ability to swap ESN on my 027 without calling
    >telecom and having to wait however.
    Tony, Jun 28, 2005
    #8
  9. In <> Mutlley wrote:

    > The Other Guy <> wrote:


    >>The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it
    >>isn't even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with
    >>multiple phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming,
    >>and performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are
    >>easier on another phone.


    > I suspect that the reason that TCNZ does not buy phones with R-IUM
    > cards is to stop parallel imports of phones under cutting their
    > monopoly for sales..


    No, it's because all of the handsets that Telecom offer need to be PTC
    tested first. Individual CDMA networks differ in the way that they are
    configured, and handset firmware needs to be customised for the
    particular network to which the handset is intended to be connected.

    Network operators don't make money out of handsets. They make money out
    of providing services.

    --
    Regards, Alastair.
    Wellington, New Zealand
    www.alastair.geek.nz

    My supplied email address is fake. Any views expressed in this posting
    are personal and its content remains the property of Alastair. Alastair
    accepts no responsibility for any misinformation resulting from this
    posting.
    Alastair McAllister, Jun 28, 2005
    #9
  10. Tony

    Richard Guest

    Alastair McAllister wrote:

    > No, it's because all of the handsets that Telecom offer need to be PTC
    > tested first. Individual CDMA networks differ in the way that they are
    > configured, and handset firmware needs to be customised for the
    > particular network to which the handset is intended to be connected.


    Case in point was a friends hooked up nokia from the states (back when telecom
    were only peddling korean junk handsets) - whenever you left the 027 coverage,
    it would try the 025 and not work properly.

    I dont know how he got it hooked up, but I suspect it was done by someone at
    telecom that shouldnt have done so.
    Richard, Jun 28, 2005
    #10
  11. Tony

    Mutlley Guest

    Alastair McAllister <> wrote:

    >In <> Mutlley wrote:
    >
    >> The Other Guy <> wrote:

    >
    >>>The SIM card issue was only looked at from one perspective, and it
    >>>isn't even the most significant one. The ability to use your SIM with
    >>>multiple phones is useful for a variety of reasons including roaming,
    >>>and performing tasks such as entering phone book details that are
    >>>easier on another phone.

    >
    >> I suspect that the reason that TCNZ does not buy phones with R-IUM
    >> cards is to stop parallel imports of phones under cutting their
    >> monopoly for sales..

    >
    >No, it's because all of the handsets that Telecom offer need to be PTC
    >tested first. Individual CDMA networks differ in the way that they are
    >configured, and handset firmware needs to be customised for the
    >particular network to which the handset is intended to be connected.
    >
    >Network operators don't make money out of handsets. They make money out
    >of providing services.


    You may be interested to know that Telecom buy it's CDMA fones via
    Sprint in the US. So what Sprint gets so does Telecom. The whole PTC
    thing is just a crock protect their monopoly of fone sales..The only
    thing that may be different to other networks is the data side of
    things. The voice side is much the same the world over, hence you can
    roam with a CDMA phone..
    Mutlley, Jun 29, 2005
    #11
  12. In <> Mutlley wrote:

    > Alastair McAllister <> wrote:


    >>No, it's because all of the handsets that Telecom offer need to be PTC
    >>tested first. Individual CDMA networks differ in the way that they are
    >>configured, and handset firmware needs to be customised for the
    >>particular network to which the handset is intended to be connected.


    > You may be interested to know that Telecom buy it's CDMA fones via
    > Sprint in the US. So what Sprint gets so does Telecom. The whole PTC
    > thing is just a crock protect their monopoly of fone sales..The only
    > thing that may be different to other networks is the data side of
    > things. The voice side is much the same the world over, hence you can
    > roam with a CDMA phone..


    Do you seriously think that Telecom would market a handset on which the
    data services do not function properly?

    --
    Regards, Alastair.
    Wellington, New Zealand
    www.alastair.geek.nz

    My supplied email address is fake. Any views expressed in this posting
    are personal and its content remains the property of Alastair. Alastair
    accepts no responsibility for any misinformation resulting from this
    posting.
    Alastair McAllister, Jun 29, 2005
    #12
  13. Tony

    Mutlley Guest

    Alastair McAllister <> wrote:

    >In <> Mutlley wrote:
    >
    >> Alastair McAllister <> wrote:

    >
    >>>No, it's because all of the handsets that Telecom offer need to be PTC
    >>>tested first. Individual CDMA networks differ in the way that they are
    >>>configured, and handset firmware needs to be customised for the
    >>>particular network to which the handset is intended to be connected.

    >
    >> You may be interested to know that Telecom buy it's CDMA fones via
    >> Sprint in the US. So what Sprint gets so does Telecom. The whole PTC
    >> thing is just a crock protect their monopoly of fone sales..The only
    >> thing that may be different to other networks is the data side of
    >> things. The voice side is much the same the world over, hence you can
    >> roam with a CDMA phone..

    >
    >Do you seriously think that Telecom would market a handset on which the
    >data services do not function properly?


    No. But in saying that I suspect that 90% of CDMA handsets currently
    sold over the counter are for voice and SMS only. Only businesses
    and the "must haves" will use the data side of things which means
    that they will buy their $800 phone from their Telecom account manager
    and not over the Harvey Normal counter..
    Mutlley, Jun 29, 2005
    #13
  14. In <> Mutlley wrote:

    > Alastair McAllister <> wrote:


    >>Do you seriously think that Telecom would market a handset on which
    >>the data services do not function properly?


    > No. But in saying that I suspect that 90% of CDMA handsets currently
    > sold over the counter are for voice and SMS only.


    SMS *is* data. Likewise for Photo Messaging, which is growing in
    popularity.

    --
    Regards, Alastair.
    Wellington, New Zealand
    www.alastair.geek.nz

    My supplied email address is fake. Any views expressed in this posting
    are personal and its content remains the property of Alastair. Alastair
    accepts no responsibility for any misinformation resulting from this
    posting.
    Alastair McAllister, Jun 30, 2005
    #14
  15. Tony

    Sc00ter Guest

    On , , Wed, 29 Jun 2005 13:41:30 +1200, Re: GSM or CDMA?, Mutlley
    <> wrote:

    >You may be interested to know that Telecom buy it's CDMA fones via
    >Sprint in the US. So what Sprint gets so does Telecom. The whole PTC
    >thing is just a crock protect their monopoly of fone sales.


    They don't make money out of handset sales, they make money out
    of the sale of network services.

    --
    Antiquis temporibus, nati tibi similes in rupibus
    ventosissimis exponebantur ad necem. (In the good
    old days, children like you were left to perish
    on windswept crags.)
    Sc00ter, Jul 6, 2005
    #15
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