Grid computing

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by mianileng, Apr 17, 2009.

  1. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    I'm interested in contributing to grid computing for a worthy
    cause but have only a vague idea of the issues involved. I
    understand that my computer will download work packets, do the
    computing work using unused cycles of my CPU, upload the result
    and download another packet and so on.

    What I'm particularly vague about is how much of my monthly data
    transfer cap it will use up. I expect that it will depend partly
    on how quickly my computer finishes each job packet, and
    therefore how much data flow will take place in a given interval,
    and probably also on the particular community I join.

    Can anyone please give me a rough idea of how much data transfer
    will be involved with a mid-range PC on a 2 Mbps connection which
    is online 15 hours a day, not doing any CPU-intensive work most
    of the time?
    mianileng, Apr 17, 2009
    #1
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  2. mianileng

    Whiskers Guest

    On 2009-04-17, mianileng <> wrote:
    > I'm interested in contributing to grid computing for a worthy
    > cause but have only a vague idea of the issues involved. I
    > understand that my computer will download work packets, do the
    > computing work using unused cycles of my CPU, upload the result
    > and download another packet and so on.
    >
    > What I'm particularly vague about is how much of my monthly data
    > transfer cap it will use up. I expect that it will depend partly
    > on how quickly my computer finishes each job packet, and
    > therefore how much data flow will take place in a given interval,
    > and probably also on the particular community I join.
    >
    > Can anyone please give me a rough idea of how much data transfer
    > will be involved with a mid-range PC on a 2 Mbps connection which
    > is online 15 hours a day, not doing any CPU-intensive work most
    > of the time?


    Perhaps you should start here
    <http://distributedcomputing.info/index.html>.

    --
    -- ^^^^^^^^^^
    -- Whiskers
    -- ~~~~~~~~~~
    Whiskers, Apr 17, 2009
    #2
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  3. "mianileng" <> wrote in message
    news:gsara4$qas$...
    > I'm interested in contributing to grid computing for a worthy cause but
    > have only a vague idea of the issues involved. I understand that my
    > computer will download work packets, do the computing work using unused
    > cycles of my CPU, upload the result and download another packet and so on.
    >
    > What I'm particularly vague about is how much of my monthly data transfer
    > cap it will use up. I expect that it will depend partly on how quickly my
    > computer finishes each job packet, and therefore how much data flow will
    > take place in a given interval, and probably also on the particular
    > community I join.
    >
    > Can anyone please give me a rough idea of how much data transfer will be
    > involved with a mid-range PC on a 2 Mbps connection which is online 15
    > hours a day, not doing any CPU-intensive work most of the time?


    It depends to some degree on how you define mid-range. I crunch for several
    projects with my host which is a an Intel P4 3.0 Ghz with 3GB memory. There
    really are a vaiety of projects to choose from, some are more CPU intensive
    and some are more memory intensive. Depending on the projects I am involved
    with, individual tasks can run from as little as a 1/2 hour on the one
    extreme and upto 3 or 4 days on the other end of the spectrum. I would say
    the average work unit is 3-5 hours long. If you have dual cores or quad
    cores you can run one task on each core at a time or specify to use only one
    core and leave the other available for your work. I know people who have
    quad cores and can crunch a task, that would take my host two hours, in 15
    minutes.

    In terms of bandwith, again it varies a lot. The largest task I ever
    downloaded was approx 1MB and most are usually not more than 100K or less so
    bandwith shouldn't be an issue unless you have extremely low caps in place
    from your ISP. When you set up your account with a project you have a LOT of
    flexibility and control as to how much of your cpu(s) you allow them to use
    and during what hours of the day you allow tasks to run etc. If you've been
    thinking about it give it a try. It's a simple easy install and not
    intrusive on your system at all. Worst thing that can happen is you change
    your mind and uninstall the software -- no harm, no foul. You are NEVER
    committed to anything -- even if you abort a work unit that is half finished
    nobody cares, they'll just resend it to somebody else.
    J¡m ßéâñ, Apr 18, 2009
    #3
  4. "J¡m ßéâñ" <> wrote in message
    news:gsbagm$kdk$...
    >
    > "mianileng" <> wrote in message
    > news:gsara4$qas$...
    >> I'm interested in contributing to grid computing for a worthy cause but
    >> have only a vague idea of the issues involved. I understand that my
    >> computer will download work packets, do the computing work using unused
    >> cycles of my CPU, upload the result and download another packet and so
    >> on.
    >>
    >> What I'm particularly vague about is how much of my monthly data transfer
    >> cap it will use up. I expect that it will depend partly on how quickly my
    >> computer finishes each job packet, and therefore how much data flow will
    >> take place in a given interval, and probably also on the particular
    >> community I join.
    >>
    >> Can anyone please give me a rough idea of how much data transfer will be
    >> involved with a mid-range PC on a 2 Mbps connection which is online 15
    >> hours a day, not doing any CPU-intensive work most of the time?

    >
    > It depends to some degree on how you define mid-range. I crunch for
    > several projects with my host which is a an Intel P4 3.0 Ghz with 3GB
    > memory. There really are a vaiety of projects to choose from, some are
    > more CPU intensive and some are more memory intensive. Depending on the
    > projects I am involved with, individual tasks can run from as little as a
    > 1/2 hour on the one extreme and upto 3 or 4 days on the other end of the
    > spectrum. I would say the average work unit is 3-5 hours long. If you have
    > dual cores or quad cores you can run one task on each core at a time or
    > specify to use only one core and leave the other available for your work.
    > I know people who have quad cores and can crunch a task, that would take
    > my host two hours, in 15 minutes.
    >
    > In terms of bandwith, again it varies a lot. The largest task I ever
    > downloaded was approx 1MB and most are usually not more than 100K or less
    > so bandwith shouldn't be an issue unless you have extremely low caps in
    > place from your ISP. When you set up your account with a project you have
    > a LOT of flexibility and control as to how much of your cpu(s) you allow
    > them to use and during what hours of the day you allow tasks to run etc.
    > If you've been thinking about it give it a try. It's a simple easy install
    > and not intrusive on your system at all. Worst thing that can happen is
    > you change your mind and uninstall the software -- no harm, no foul. You
    > are NEVER committed to anything -- even if you abort a work unit that is
    > half finished nobody cares, they'll just resend it to somebody else.
    >


    I forgot to mention .... some applications will allow you to run their
    projects with a high-end video card instead of (or in addition to) your CPU.
    If you have an ATI 3850, 3870, 4850, 4870 or better or any CUDA enabled
    Nvidia gpu there are projects you can crunch with those. Go here
    http://boinc.berkeley.edu/ to download the management/scheduling software.
    Once that's installed you can choose from about 20-30 different projects to
    crunch for.
    J¡m ßéâñ, Apr 18, 2009
    #4
  5. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    Whiskers wrote:
    > On 2009-04-17, mianileng <> wrote:
    >> I'm interested in contributing to grid computing for a worthy
    >> cause but have only a vague idea of the issues involved. I
    >> understand that my computer will download work packets, do the
    >> computing work using unused cycles of my CPU, upload the
    >> result
    >> and download another packet and so on.
    >>
    >> What I'm particularly vague about is how much of my monthly
    >> data
    >> transfer cap it will use up. I expect that it will depend
    >> partly
    >> on how quickly my computer finishes each job packet, and
    >> therefore how much data flow will take place in a given
    >> interval,
    >> and probably also on the particular community I join.
    >>
    >> Can anyone please give me a rough idea of how much data
    >> transfer
    >> will be involved with a mid-range PC on a 2 Mbps connection
    >> which
    >> is online 15 hours a day, not doing any CPU-intensive work
    >> most
    >> of the time?

    >
    > Perhaps you should start here
    > http://distributedcomputing.info/index.html.


    Thanks.
    mianileng, Apr 18, 2009
    #5
  6. mianileng

    mianileng Guest

    Steve wrote:
    > In article <gsara4$qas$>,
    > lid
    > says...
    >>
    >> I'm interested in contributing to grid computing for a worthy
    >> cause but have only a vague idea of the issues involved. I
    >> understand that my computer will download work packets, do the
    >> computing work using unused cycles of my CPU, upload the
    >> result
    >> and download another packet and so on.
    >>
    >> What I'm particularly vague about is how much of my monthly
    >> data
    >> transfer cap it will use up. I expect that it will depend
    >> partly
    >> on how quickly my computer finishes each job packet, and
    >> therefore how much data flow will take place in a given
    >> interval,
    >> and probably also on the particular community I join.
    >>
    >> Can anyone please give me a rough idea of how much data
    >> transfer
    >> will be involved with a mid-range PC on a 2 Mbps connection
    >> which
    >> is online 15 hours a day, not doing any CPU-intensive work
    >> most
    >> of the time?

    >
    > You'ld think the people who your going to give your cpu cycles
    > to
    > would know that, wouldn't you? Why don't you ask them?
    >

    I intend to. But I felt that it's always a good idea to gain a
    wider perspective from people for whom it's not a primary
    commitment.
    mianileng, Apr 18, 2009
    #6
  7. mianileng

    Guest

    "mianileng" <> wrote:

    >I'd heard that PS3s and video card GPUs can also be put to use,
    >but none of my machines is likely to be fitted with a high-end
    >card.


    My PS3 has the option to crunch numbers for the Stanford University
    when not in use. Called Folding@Home
    http://folding.stanford.edu/

    The PS3 gets a tad hot when in use, might be something to do in the
    winter :)
    --

    Reenacted Vintage Photos
    http://imgur.com/17Kz.jpg
    , Apr 19, 2009
    #7
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