Greasy lens - best way to clean?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Lars Bonnesen, Dec 27, 2004.

  1. I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean it?

    I once had a kind of "lens tissue", but in absence of this, what is best to
    use? Soft cloth, toilet paper, newspaper, ordinary paper, or...?

    Regards, Lars.
    Lars Bonnesen, Dec 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. Lars Bonnesen

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 27 Dec 2004 in rec.photo.digital, Lars Bonnesen wrote:

    > I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean
    > it?
    >
    > I once had a kind of "lens tissue", but in absence of this, what is
    > best to use? Soft cloth, toilet paper, newspaper, ordinary paper,
    > or...?


    I just bought a new camera; the guy at the dealer tossed in a couple of
    microfiber lens cleaning cloths. I would imagine you could pick them up
    for not very much in any photo supply store.

    Looking at them, they're Photosilk brand: http://www.photosilk.com/

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
    Joe Makowiec, Dec 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. Lars Bonnesen

    Guest

    Before I give you any advice, just how expensive is your lens? :)

    Best is a proper lens tissue, barely dampened with lens cleaning
    solution. Next best would be one of those soft cloths specifically for
    cleaning eyeglasses. In emergencies, in the absence of anything better,
    I usually seek out a clean soft cotton cloth very lightly applied after
    fogging the lens with breath. At no time would I ever let paper of any
    kind touch my lenses, be they eyeglasses or other - coatings go
    bye-bye.

    Peace!
    ECM
    , Dec 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Lars Bonnesen

    C Wright Guest

    On 12/27/04 8:08 AM, in article
    41d0177d$0$182$, "Lars Bonnesen"
    <> wrote:

    > I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean it?
    >
    > I once had a kind of "lens tissue", but in absence of this, what is best to
    > use? Soft cloth, toilet paper, newspaper, ordinary paper, or...?
    >
    > Regards, Lars.
    >
    >

    Zeiss makes lens cloth packets that I'm sure are widely available. They are
    pre-dampened with isopropyl alcohol and are recommended for coated lenses.
    I would not normally use anything but a dry brush, but if you have something
    like fingerprints on the lens you pretty much have to wet it with something.
    Chuck
    C Wright, Dec 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Lars Bonnesen

    HRosita Guest

    >I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean it?
    >
    >


    Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning fluid.

    Put a few drops of fluid on the tissue and clean the lens. Never put fluid on
    the lens and don't use paper.
    Rosita
    HRosita, Dec 27, 2004
    #5
  6. Lars Bonnesen

    Jeremy Guest

    BAD ADVICE!


    >
    > Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning fluid.
    >
    >

    Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain silicone and may be
    destructive to optical lens coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning chemicals
    on a fine camera lens. Never.

    I use Kodak lens cleaning tissue (now made by Tiffen, under license). I
    also use Kodak lens cleaning fluid (it must be 30 years old--that's how
    little of it I've used all this time!). I presume that it is still
    available. If not, this link has cleaning fluid and lens tissue:

    http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/formulamc.html

    I have tried microfibre cloth, but it smudged my lens surface. Disposable
    lens tissue, while more expensive in the long run, did not smudge.

    After you've solved your problem, consider affixing a UV or Skylight filter
    as a lens protector. It is estimated at a good filter may degrade the image
    by perhaps 2%. It is better to sacrifice a filter than to ruin a lens, in
    my view.
    Jeremy, Dec 27, 2004
    #6
  7. Lars Bonnesen

    Chip Gallo Guest

    HRosita wrote:
    >>I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean it?
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    > Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning fluid.
    >
    > Put a few drops of fluid on the tissue and clean the lens. Never put fluid on
    > the lens and don't use paper.
    > Rosita
    >
    >

    Promaster by Lenspen. Around $10 online or at camera stores. Has a brush
    on one end and some kind of dry (power) cleaner on the other. See:

    http://www.penncamera.com/store/item.asp?ITEM_ID=2308

    Happy Holidays!

    Chip Gallo
    www.flickr.com/photos/chipgallo
    Chip Gallo, Dec 27, 2004
    #7
  8. Lars Bonnesen

    Lisa Horton Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    Jeremy wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning fluid.
    > >
    > >

    > Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain silicone and may be
    > destructive to optical lens coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning chemicals
    > on a fine camera lens. Never.
    >
    > I use Kodak lens cleaning tissue (now made by Tiffen, under license). I
    > also use Kodak lens cleaning fluid (it must be 30 years old--that's how
    > little of it I've used all this time!). I presume that it is still
    > available. If not, this link has cleaning fluid and lens tissue:
    >
    > http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/formulamc.html
    >
    > I have tried microfibre cloth, but it smudged my lens surface. Disposable
    > lens tissue, while more expensive in the long run, did not smudge.
    >
    > After you've solved your problem, consider affixing a UV or Skylight filter
    > as a lens protector. It is estimated at a good filter may degrade the image
    > by perhaps 2%. It is better to sacrifice a filter than to ruin a lens, in
    > my view.


    Microfiber cloths are the ultimate in lens cleaning "tissue". Just
    because you're incapable of using a simple tool like that is no reason
    to scare others away from the superior lens cleaning tool.

    Lisa
    Lisa Horton, Dec 27, 2004
    #8
  9. Lars Bonnesen

    Don Lathrop Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    Jeremy wrote:

    > Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain
    > silicone and may be destructive to optical lens
    > coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning chemicals
    > on a fine camera lens. Never.


    Isn't this advice from 30 years ago?

    I may be wrong, but isn't the lens cleaning solution
    sold by LensCrafters basically clean water plus
    isopropyl alcohol? Aren't their lens tissues simply
    lint-free, with no silicone?

    I believe most lens cleaners and tissues sold by the
    big chains like LC and Pearle are designed to handle
    the multitude of coatings offered by those companies,
    and don't contain silicone.

    Like I say, I might be wrong, but I recall hearing
    that advice about silicone decades ago when
    drug stores sold little eyeglass cleaning kits that
    were pretty bad, but I'm not sure that holds anymore.
    Don Lathrop, Dec 27, 2004
    #9
  10. Lars Bonnesen

    Bob Williams Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    Lisa Horton wrote:
    >
    > Jeremy wrote:
    >
    >>>Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning fluid.
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain silicone and may be
    >>destructive to optical lens coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning chemicals
    >>on a fine camera lens. Never.
    >>
    >>I use Kodak lens cleaning tissue (now made by Tiffen, under license). I
    >>also use Kodak lens cleaning fluid (it must be 30 years old--that's how
    >>little of it I've used all this time!). I presume that it is still
    >>available. If not, this link has cleaning fluid and lens tissue:
    >>
    >>http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/formulamc.html
    >>
    >>I have tried microfibre cloth, but it smudged my lens surface. Disposable
    >>lens tissue, while more expensive in the long run, did not smudge.
    >>
    >>After you've solved your problem, consider affixing a UV or Skylight filter
    >>as a lens protector. It is estimated at a good filter may degrade the image
    >>by perhaps 2%. It is better to sacrifice a filter than to ruin a lens, in
    >>my view.

    >
    >
    > Microfiber cloths are the ultimate in lens cleaning "tissue". Just
    > because you're incapable of using a simple tool like that is no reason
    > to scare others away from the superior lens cleaning tool.
    >
    > Lisa


    I agree that microfiber cloths are the best remedy for grease on a lens.
    A quality photoshop may give you a free sample ar will sell you a larger
    piece.
    I would dampen the lens surface first by breathing on it several times
    to facilitate removal of the grease.
    Bob Williams
    Bob Williams, Dec 27, 2004
    #10
  11. Lars Bonnesen

    Frank ess Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    Lisa Horton wrote:
    > Jeremy wrote:
    >>
    >>>
    >>> Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning
    >>> fluid.
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain silicone and may be
    >> destructive to optical lens coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning
    >> chemicals on a fine camera lens. Never.
    >>
    >> I use Kodak lens cleaning tissue (now made by Tiffen, under
    >> license). I also use Kodak lens cleaning fluid (it must be 30 years
    >> old--that's how little of it I've used all this time!). I presume
    >> that it is still available. If not, this link has cleaning fluid
    >> and lens tissue:
    >>
    >> http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/formulamc.html
    >>
    >> I have tried microfibre cloth, but it smudged my lens surface.
    >> Disposable lens tissue, while more expensive in the long run, did
    >> not smudge.
    >>
    >> After you've solved your problem, consider affixing a UV or Skylight
    >> filter as a lens protector. It is estimated at a good filter may
    >> degrade the image by perhaps 2%. It is better to sacrifice a filter
    >> than to ruin a lens, in my view.

    >
    > Microfiber cloths are the ultimate in lens cleaning "tissue". Just
    > because you're incapable of using a simple tool like that is no reason
    > to scare others away from the superior lens cleaning tool.
    >
    > Lisa


    I have ROR, Residual Oil Remover, bought it from B&H. Instructions are
    to moisten a lens tissue, apply to surface, remove with a clean tissue.
    Works good, seems to minimize the stick-to-it of subsequent
    contaminants. Says, Do Not Use With Micro Fiber Cloths.

    After a good blow-off with the puffer-ball, microfiber seems to do a
    good job for quick-cleans.


    --
    Frank ess
    Frank ess, Dec 27, 2004
    #11
  12. Lars Bonnesen

    Frank ess Guest

    Chip Gallo wrote:
    > HRosita wrote:
    >>> I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean
    >>> it?

    >>
    >>
    >> Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning
    >> fluid. Put a few drops of fluid on the tissue and clean the lens.
    >> Never put
    >> fluid on the lens and don't use paper.
    >> Rosita
    >>
    >>

    > Promaster by Lenspen. Around $10 online or at camera stores. Has a
    > brush on one end and some kind of dry (power) cleaner on the other.
    > See:
    >
    > http://www.penncamera.com/store/item.asp?ITEM_ID=2308
    >
    > Happy Holidays!
    >



    "I have ROR, Residual Oil Remover, bought it from B&H. Instructions are
    to moisten a lens tissue, apply to surface, remove with a clean tissue.
    Works good, seems to minimize the stick-to-it of subsequent
    contaminants. Says, Do Not Use With Micro Fiber Cloths.

    After a good blow-off with the puffer-ball, microfiber seems to do a
    good job for quick-cleans."


    --
    Frank ess
    Frank ess, Dec 27, 2004
    #12
  13. Lars Bonnesen

    Jeremy Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    "Bob Williams" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >
    >
    > Lisa Horton wrote:
    > >
    > > Jeremy wrote:
    > >
    > >>>Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning

    fluid.
    > >>>
    > >>>
    > >>
    > >>Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain silicone and may be
    > >>destructive to optical lens coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning

    chemicals
    > >>on a fine camera lens. Never.
    > >>
    > >>I use Kodak lens cleaning tissue (now made by Tiffen, under license). I
    > >>also use Kodak lens cleaning fluid (it must be 30 years old--that's how
    > >>little of it I've used all this time!). I presume that it is still
    > >>available. If not, this link has cleaning fluid and lens tissue:
    > >>
    > >>http://www.2filter.com/prices/products/formulamc.html
    > >>
    > >>I have tried microfibre cloth, but it smudged my lens surface.

    Disposable
    > >>lens tissue, while more expensive in the long run, did not smudge.
    > >>
    > >>After you've solved your problem, consider affixing a UV or Skylight

    filter
    > >>as a lens protector. It is estimated at a good filter may degrade the

    image
    > >>by perhaps 2%. It is better to sacrifice a filter than to ruin a lens,

    in
    > >>my view.

    > >
    > >
    > > Microfiber cloths are the ultimate in lens cleaning "tissue". Just
    > > because you're incapable of using a simple tool like that is no reason
    > > to scare others away from the superior lens cleaning tool.
    > >
    > > Lisa

    >
    > I agree that microfiber cloths are the best remedy for grease on a lens.
    > A quality photoshop may give you a free sample ar will sell you a larger
    > piece.
    > I would dampen the lens surface first by breathing on it several times
    > to facilitate removal of the grease.
    > Bob Williams
    >


    I was not trying to "scare away" the OP from microfiber cloth. Had Ms.
    Horton taken the time to read my post she would have seen that I was
    recommending that the OP stay away from unknown types of eyeglass cleaning
    supplies.

    The fact that I found microfiber cloths did not clean as thoroughly as lens
    tissue in no way indicates that I am "incapable" of using them. Her
    condescending attitude was completely uncalled for. I leave it to the
    individual user to determine which is superior, lens tissue or microfiber
    cloths. My own experience revealed that I got better results from a
    one-time use of a lens tissue.

    Perhaps I should be less critical of Ms. Horton's motives, in view of the
    series of personal attacks that she has recently been under, but I really
    think that barbs were unjustified and were overkill. Of all the things to
    argue over, lens tissue is a pretty silly subject. She and Poulsen must be
    cut from the same cloth.
    Jeremy, Dec 27, 2004
    #13
  14. Lars Bonnesen

    Don Lathrop Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    Jeremy wrote:

    > I was not trying to "scare away" the OP
    > from microfiber cloth.


    You wrote, "I have tried microfibre cloth,
    but it smudged my lens surface," implying
    microfiber cloth smudges lenses.

    > Had Ms. Horton taken the time to read my
    > post she would have seen that I was
    > recommending that the OP stay away from
    > unknown types of eyeglass cleaning supplies.


    You wrote, "Never use eyeglass cleaning
    chemicals on a fine camera lens. Never."

    With an all-caps subject line, exclamation
    point and single-word capper, you tried to
    create a dramatic fear of all eyeglass gear,
    not "unknown types," as you say now.

    It's not Lisa's fault the spectacular headline
    bounced back at you.
    Don Lathrop, Dec 27, 2004
    #14
  15. Lars Bonnesen

    Bill Crocker Guest

    NEVER use toilet paper...it can actually have abrasives in it! Seriously.
    Kleenex tissue should be ok. Make sure it's not the kind with lotion.

    Bill Crocker


    "Lars Bonnesen" <> wrote in message
    news:41d0177d$0$182$...
    >I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean it?
    >
    > I once had a kind of "lens tissue", but in absence of this, what is best
    > to use? Soft cloth, toilet paper, newspaper, ordinary paper, or...?
    >
    > Regards, Lars.
    >
    Bill Crocker, Dec 27, 2004
    #15
  16. Lars Bonnesen

    Robert Scott Guest

    "Lars Bonnesen" <> wrote in message
    news:41d0177d$0$182$...
    >I got some fingerprints on my lens. What is the best way to clean it?



    I use Kodak lens cleaning tissue and "R.O.R" (residual oil remover) lens
    cleaning fluid at home for serious clean-ups. I also carry a microfiber
    cleaning cloth in each of my camera bags. I keep them sealed up in small
    ziplock plastic bags to keep them from becoming contaminated with whatever
    dirt and dust might find its way into my bags.

    Good shooting,
    Bob Scott
    Robert Scott, Dec 27, 2004
    #16
  17. Lars Bonnesen

    Don Lathrop Guest

    Bill Crocker wrote:

    > Kleenex tissue should be ok.


    Terrible advice. Kleenex tissue is
    probably the most linty paper product
    you can find. They also contain abrasives,
    just like paper towels or cardboard.
    Don Lathrop, Dec 27, 2004
    #17
  18. Lars Bonnesen

    Jeremy Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    "Don Lathrop" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Jeremy wrote:
    >
    > > I was not trying to "scare away" the OP
    > > from microfiber cloth.

    >
    > You wrote, "I have tried microfibre cloth,
    > but it smudged my lens surface," implying
    > microfiber cloth smudges lenses.
    >
    > > Had Ms. Horton taken the time to read my
    > > post she would have seen that I was
    > > recommending that the OP stay away from
    > > unknown types of eyeglass cleaning supplies.

    >
    > You wrote, "Never use eyeglass cleaning
    > chemicals on a fine camera lens. Never."
    >
    > With an all-caps subject line, exclamation
    > point and single-word capper, you tried to
    > create a dramatic fear of all eyeglass gear,
    > not "unknown types," as you say now.
    >
    > It's not Lisa's fault the spectacular headline
    > bounced back at you.
    >
    >


    I tried to "create a dramatic fear . . .?"
    Are you kidding?

    All I said was that eyeglass cleaner was not a recommended way to clean
    optical lenses. My Pentax lens manual says as much.

    And the fact is that I have had better results with tissue than with
    microfiber cloth.

    Horton just wanted to beat on someone. Give it a rest already.
    Jeremy, Dec 27, 2004
    #18
  19. Re: BAD ADVICE!

    Jeremy wrote:

    > .... Of all the things to
    > argue over, lens tissue is a pretty silly subject.


    Yet you persist.

    > She and Poulsen must be cut from the same cloth.


    And make gratuitous comparisons.

    --
    John McWilliams
    John McWilliams, Dec 27, 2004
    #19
  20. Lars Bonnesen

    C J Campbell Guest

    Re: BAD ADVICE!

    "Jeremy" <> wrote in message
    news:g4Zzd.4753$...
    >
    > >
    > > Go to a place that sells glasses and get a lens tissue and cleaning

    fluid.
    > >
    > >

    > Eyeglass cleaning cloths or tissue may contain silicone and may be
    > destructive to optical lens coatings. Never use eyeglass cleaning

    chemicals
    > on a fine camera lens. Never.


    Heck, I once had eyeglass cleaning fluid ruin my eyeglasses!
    C J Campbell, Dec 27, 2004
    #20
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