GPS and Digital Photography

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Jack, Apr 13, 2006.

  1. Jack

    Jack Guest

    The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a GPS(Garmin
    60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make geo-positioning easier.
     
    Jack, Apr 13, 2006
    #1
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  2. Jack

    Tad Guest

    To bad they did not use Nikon for the Article. With them you can connect
    the GPS directly to the camera.

    "Jack" <> wrote in message
    news:C9r%f.101$...
    > The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a

    GPS(Garmin
    > 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make geo-positioning

    easier.
     
    Tad, Apr 13, 2006
    #2
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  3. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Jack wrote:
    > The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
    > GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
    > geo-positioning easier.



    Thanks, Jack. Having a 60Cx and EOS 20D it may be of interest: I'll
    look for a copy.

    Phil
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 13, 2006
    #3
  4. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Tad wrote:
    > To bad they did not use Nikon for the Article. With them you can connect
    > the GPS directly to the camera.
    >
    > "Jack" <> wrote in message
    > news:C9r%f.101$...
    >
    >>The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a

    >
    > GPS(Garmin
    >
    >>60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make geo-positioning

    >
    > easier.
    >
    >



    Could be the author owns a Canon :)
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 13, 2006
    #4
  5. These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
    built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?

    "Phil Wheeler" <> wrote in message
    news:wZs%f.2017$...
    > Jack wrote:
    > > The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
    > > GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
    > > geo-positioning easier.

    >
    >
    > Thanks, Jack. Having a 60Cx and EOS 20D it may be of interest: I'll
    > look for a copy.
    >
    > Phil
     
    Happy Traveler, Apr 13, 2006
    #5
  6. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Happy Traveler wrote:
    > These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
    > built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?
    >


    May be easy for the manufacturer, not for the user. None have them
    today that I know of.
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 13, 2006
    #6
  7. Jack

    J. Clarke Guest

    Phil Wheeler wrote:

    > Happy Traveler wrote:
    >> These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
    >> built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?
    >>

    >
    > May be easy for the manufacturer, not for the user. None have them
    > today that I know of.


    Kind of pointless anyway. Given the performance of purpose-made handheld GPS
    receivers I would be _very_ surprised if anything satellite-based in a cell
    phone actually worked. Most cell-phone locator services work by
    triangulation on the cell antennas, not by referencing the satellite
    system--the number of cell phones that actually have GPS satellite receiver
    built in is quite small.

    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 13, 2006
    #7
  8. Jack

    Canopus Guest

    Phil Wheeler on 13/04/2006 wrote:

    >Happy Traveler wrote:
    >>These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
    >>built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?
    >>

    >
    >May be easy for the manufacturer, not for the user. None have them today
    >that I know of.


    There are a few, but, they are very expensive and tend to be used for
    specialised use.

    --
    Rob

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/canopus_archives/
     
    Canopus, Apr 13, 2006
    #8
  9. Jack

    Canopus Guest

    Jack on 13/04/2006 wrote:

    >The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
    >GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
    >geo-positioning easier.


    That is the precise reason I bought the Garmin GPS 60, to geotag my
    photos. Any other use is a happy extra for me.

    --
    Rob

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/canopus_archives/
     
    Canopus, Apr 13, 2006
    #9
  10. Jack

    Canopus Guest

    Tad on 13/04/2006 wrote:

    >To bad they did not use Nikon for the Article. With them you can connect
    >the GPS directly to the camera.


    Drool! My next camera will have to have that feature and hopefully more
    will have them as there seems to be an increasing call for it.

    --
    Rob

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/canopus_archives/
     
    Canopus, Apr 13, 2006
    #10
  11. Jack

    Ted Edwards Guest

    Jack wrote:
    > The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
    > GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
    > geo-positioning easier.


    If you download and save your active track and your pictures to your
    computer before doing anything to them, it is a trivial project to match
    up the time stamps from the picture files and the GPS track log. In
    fact it so easy it could even be done with one of those spread sheet
    thingys.

    Ted
     
    Ted Edwards, Apr 13, 2006
    #11
  12. "Happy Traveler" <> writes:
    >These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
    >built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?


    Apparently the cellphone GPS receivers are not full independent GPS
    receivers - they depend on the cellular data connection to a cell site
    (which includes a full GPS receiver) for some of the data needed to get
    a rapid location fix.

    So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
    would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
    you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
    to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.

    Dave
     
    Dave Martindale, Apr 13, 2006
    #12
  13. Jack

    Artoi Guest

    In article <e1mcf2$b6$>, Dave Martindale
    <> wrote:

    > So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
    > would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
    > you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
    > to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.


    No thanks. dSLR are already too baulky these days.

    --
     
    Artoi, Apr 13, 2006
    #13
  14. Jack

    J. Clarke Guest

    Dave Martindale wrote:

    > "Happy Traveler" <> writes:
    >>These days, when virtually every 2oz cellphone has a simple GPS receiver
    >>built-in, how difficult can it be to add one to a 2lb DSLR?

    >
    > Apparently the cellphone GPS receivers are not full independent GPS
    > receivers - they depend on the cellular data connection to a cell site
    > (which includes a full GPS receiver) for some of the data needed to get
    > a rapid location fix.


    I read that article too and the author is very confused.

    There is no such thing as "partial GPS". To use differential GPS you need a
    full standard GPS plus an additional receiver. The benefit of doing this
    is that you get a time correction from the relatively nearby DGPS
    transmitter that allows _very_ accurate positioning--this is mainly used in
    surveying. One does not get a _faster_ fix--the time required to acquire
    the satellites remains the same, and once the satellites are acquired the
    fix is updated at very short intervals, how short depending on the
    particular receiver but short enough to easily track the position of a
    moving car--fast moving planes may need fancier hardware.

    The cellular location system uses technology that may be related to or
    derived from that used in the satellite-based system but it is based on the
    cell towers and not on satellites--it may also be able to use a
    satellite-based system if there is one in the phone but that's not the
    usual setup.

    I do wish that they had found something to call it other than GPS, as using
    the same term to identify two systems that perform a related function gets
    confusing quickly.

    > So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
    > would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
    > you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
    > to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.
    >
    > Dave


    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Apr 13, 2006
    #14
  15. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Ted Edwards wrote:
    > Jack wrote:
    >
    >> The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
    >> GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
    >> geo-positioning easier.

    >
    >
    > If you download and save your active track and your pictures to your
    > computer before doing anything to them, it is a trivial project to match
    > up the time stamps from the picture files and the GPS track log. In
    > fact it so easy it could even be done with one of those spread sheet
    > thingys.
    >


    Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track memory ;)
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 13, 2006
    #15
  16. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Artoi wrote:
    > In article <e1mcf2$b6$>, Dave Martindale
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>So if your camera happened to *also* be a cellphone, this technology
    >>would work there. But for the average camera that is not a cellphone,
    >>you'd need a more general-purpose GPS chipset. Not terribly difficult
    >>to do, just not comparable to cellphone with GPS.

    >
    >
    > No thanks. dSLR are already too baulky these days.
    >


    If it is bauking, get it serviced.

    Phil
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 13, 2006
    #16
  17. Jack

    Ted Edwards Guest

    Phil Wheeler wrote:
    > Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track
    > memory ;)


    Hiking? Some of the hand helds might have enough memory for daily track
    downloads and as long as you didn't mess with the saved picture files
    other than copying them, the time stamps would still be valid.

    If a vehicle was involved, a laptop could also have been.

    Ted
     
    Ted Edwards, Apr 14, 2006
    #17
  18. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Ted Edwards wrote:
    > Phil Wheeler wrote:
    >
    >> Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track
    >> memory ;)

    >
    >
    > Hiking? Some of the hand helds might have enough memory for daily track
    > downloads and as long as you didn't mess with the saved picture files
    > other than copying them, the time stamps would still be valid.
    >
    > If a vehicle was involved, a laptop could also have been.
    >


    I generally do not hike with a laptop.
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 14, 2006
    #18
  19. Jack

    Phil Wheeler Guest

    Ted Edwards wrote:
    > Phil Wheeler wrote:
    >
    >> Last trip was 14 days and over 2000 images. Might stress my track
    >> memory ;)

    >
    >
    > Hiking? Some of the hand helds might have enough memory for daily track
    > downloads and as long as you didn't mess with the saved picture files
    > other than copying them, the time stamps would still be valid.
    >
    > If a vehicle was involved, a laptop could also have been.
    >


    Why speculate on a situation you were not in? Seems odd.

    Don't need a GPSR to tell me what shots I took and where, period.

    Phil
     
    Phil Wheeler, Apr 14, 2006
    #19
  20. Jack

    Dave Guest

    Just curious about using a GPS receiver and taking pictures. Why might
    someone want to coordinate the two? Are they using the GPS to mark a
    waypoint (coordinates) about where the image was taken? Just wondering what
    other uses they have.




    "Jack" <> wrote in message
    news:C9r%f.101$...
    > The June issue of Digital Photographer has a good article on using a
    > GPS(Garmin 60csx), Canon DSLR, and inexpensive software to make
    > geo-positioning easier.
     
    Dave, Apr 14, 2006
    #20
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