Goodbye ReiserFS?

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 12, 2006.

  1. I've been using ReiserFS heavily for some years on both my own and my
    clients' machines, so it came as a bit of a shock to read this proposal to
    move away from it
    <http://linux.wordpress.com/2006/09/27/suse-102-ditching-reiserfs-as-it-default-fs/>.

    One drawback mentioned with the current implementation is that it uses the
    Big Kernel Lock (BKL). This is an obsolete locking mechanism in the Linux
    kernel--obsolete because it doesn't scale to multiple CPUs, preemption and
    the like.

    Suggestions for alternatives seem be split between ext3 and XFS. ext3 has
    been around almost as long as ReiserFS but seems to be slower, while XFS
    seems to have more ReiserFS-like characteristics of handling lots of files,
    but perhaps not the same level of maturity.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Earl Grey Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > I've been using ReiserFS heavily for some years on both my own and my
    > clients' machines, so it came as a bit of a shock to read this proposal to
    > move away from it
    > <http://linux.wordpress.com/2006/09/27/suse-102-ditching-reiserfs-as-it-default-fs/>.
    >
    > One drawback mentioned with the current implementation is that it uses the
    > Big Kernel Lock (BKL). This is an obsolete locking mechanism in the Linux
    > kernel--obsolete because it doesn't scale to multiple CPUs, preemption and
    > the like.
    >
    > Suggestions for alternatives seem be split between ext3 and XFS. ext3 has
    > been around almost as long as ReiserFS but seems to be slower, while XFS
    > seems to have more ReiserFS-like characteristics of handling lots of files,
    > but perhaps not the same level of maturity.


    Is this related ?
    http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=34990
    Earl Grey, Oct 12, 2006
    #2
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  3. Another interesting item here
    <http://linuxmafia.com/faq/Filesystems/reiserfs.html> from long-time kernel
    hacker Ted Ts'o, explaining a fundamental difference in the journalling
    mechanisms between ext3 and XFS (comments on the latter also apply to
    ReiserFS). Basically ext3 looks worse in benchmarks because it's writing
    more data to disk in the journal, but that makes it more reliable on your
    stock-standard PC hardware, which doesn't react to power outages very well.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 12, 2006
    #3
  4. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Rob Guest

    Rob, Oct 12, 2006
    #4
  5. Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 12, 2006
    #5
  6. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Enkidu Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > Another interesting item here
    > <http://linuxmafia.com/faq/Filesystems/reiserfs.html> from long-time kernel
    > hacker Ted Ts'o, explaining a fundamental difference in the journalling
    > mechanisms between ext3 and XFS (comments on the latter also apply to
    > ReiserFS). Basically ext3 looks worse in benchmarks because it's writing
    > more data to disk in the journal, but that makes it more reliable on your
    > stock-standard PC hardware, which doesn't react to power outages very well.
    >

    The one time I created a reiserfs ((several GB as I recall) any time I
    tried to create anything *in* it, it claimed it was full. Obviously it
    was my fault, but I didn;t have time to figure out my cock-up.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    Enkidu, Oct 12, 2006
    #6
  7. In message <>, Enkidu wrote:

    > The one time I created a reiserfs ((several GB as I recall) any time I
    > tried to create anything *in* it, it claimed it was full. Obviously it
    > was my fault, but I didn;t have time to figure out my cock-up.


    Really? I've done dozens of the things. Just "mkfs -t reiserfs" and that was
    it.

    But they do take bloody ages to mount, even when dismounted cleanly.
    Lawrence D'Oliveiro, Oct 12, 2006
    #7
  8. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Enkidu Guest

    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > In message <>, Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >> The one time I created a reiserfs ((several GB as I recall) any time I
    >> tried to create anything *in* it, it claimed it was full. Obviously it
    >> was my fault, but I didn;t have time to figure out my cock-up.

    >
    > Really? I've done dozens of the things. Just "mkfs -t reiserfs" and that was
    > it.
    >
    > But they do take bloody ages to mount, even when dismounted cleanly.
    >

    Just created a new one on a virtual disk within VMWare and it works
    fine. As I said, I didn't have time to check at the the time.

    Incidentally, on my Ubuntu system you can also do:

    mkreiserfs <dev> or
    mkfs.reiserfs

    Cheers,

    Cliff
    Enkidu, Oct 12, 2006
    #8
  9. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    aum Guest

    On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:05:39 +1300, Earl Grey wrote:
    > Is this related ?
    > http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=34990


    That's only a factor if Hans Reiser is not allowed to debug reiser4 and
    maintain reiserfs from within his jail cell.

    There'd be some developers who'd appreciate a jail sentence (in the right
    prison) just to get some peace from outside distractions so they can
    concentrate on their code.
    aum, Oct 12, 2006
    #9
  10. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    peterwn Guest

    aum wrote:
    > On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:05:39 +1300, Earl Grey wrote:
    > > Is this related ?
    > > http://www.theinquirer.net/default.aspx?article=34990

    >
    > That's only a factor if Hans Reiser is not allowed to debug reiser4 and
    > maintain reiserfs from within his jail cell.
    >
    > There'd be some developers who'd appreciate a jail sentence (in the right
    > prison) just to get some peace from outside distractions so they can
    > concentrate on their code.


    Unfortunately prison authorities do not AFAIK permit computers unless
    they are heavily locked down. They are afraid they would be used to
    breach elctronic security systems.
    peterwn, Oct 13, 2006
    #10
  11. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Lonney Guest

    I run ext3 for / and /boot

    XFS for everything else. i.e. /var /usr /home

    XFS is far far far better and with a few tweaks can perform as well as
    ReiserFS does with small files.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XFS
    http://www-128.ibm.com/developerworks/library/l-fs9.html

    I'm surprised to hear you say XFS doesnt have the same level of
    maturity? XFS was developed by SGI, that speaks volumes in it self.


    Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:
    > I've been using ReiserFS heavily for some years on both my own and my
    > clients' machines, so it came as a bit of a shock to read this proposal to
    > move away from it
    > <http://linux.wordpress.com/2006/09/27/suse-102-ditching-reiserfs-as-it-default-fs/>.
    >
    > One drawback mentioned with the current implementation is that it uses the
    > Big Kernel Lock (BKL). This is an obsolete locking mechanism in the Linux
    > kernel--obsolete because it doesn't scale to multiple CPUs, preemption and
    > the like.
    >
    > Suggestions for alternatives seem be split between ext3 and XFS. ext3 has
    > been around almost as long as ReiserFS but seems to be slower, while XFS
    > seems to have more ReiserFS-like characteristics of handling lots of files,
    > but perhaps not the same level of maturity.
    Lonney, Oct 13, 2006
    #11
  12. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Blue Guest

    On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 21:01:01 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > Suggestions for alternatives seem be split between ext3 and XFS. ext3 has
    > been around almost as long as ReiserFS but seems to be slower, while XFS
    > seems to have more ReiserFS-like characteristics of handling lots of files,
    > but perhaps not the same level of maturity.


    Progres, at certain points in time it seems like it is a bad move.

    Let ReiserFS go, and then everyone can tweak/develop XFS. XFS will then
    mature and rule okay. Time as always will be the judge.

    ReiserFS has servered you well, just like many of your sex partners, and
    it should be remembered in that light.
    Blue, Oct 13, 2006
    #12
  13. Lawrence D'Oliveiro

    Blue Guest

    On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 22:26:36 +1300, Lawrence D'Oliveiro wrote:

    > But they do take bloody ages to mount, even when dismounted cleanly.


    Just like a woman ;-)

    Sorry could not resist.
    Blue, Oct 13, 2006
    #13
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