Good Sports Photography Camera

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by ButlerFootball, Jul 12, 2006.

  1. Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I should
    get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.

    Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
    ButlerFootball, Jul 12, 2006
    #1
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  2. ButlerFootball

    Peter Guest

    Canon 20D or 30D.



    "ButlerFootball" <u24045@uwe> wrote in message news:6325f33703fb5@uwe...
    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    > local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    > sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I
    > should
    > get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    > currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Peter, Jul 12, 2006
    #2
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  3. Peter wrote:
    >Canon 20D or 30D.
    >
    >> Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    >> local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the

    >[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
    >>
    >> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    Thanks Peter, I will take a look at those.
     
    ButlerFootball, Jul 12, 2006
    #3
  4. ButlerFootball

    Joe Makowiec Guest

    On 12 Jul 2006 in rec.photo.digital, ButlerFootball wrote:

    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website
    > for a local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos
    > from the sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital
    > camera I should get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500
    > - $1,000 range. I am currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would
    > like something better.


    Your budget's a bit low.

    Just about any (digital) SLR camera will do just fine. You'll want a
    zoom which covers at least a 200mm focal length if the camera has a DX-
    size sensor (ie most lower-end Canons, and all Nikons). And if you're
    talking about night games, you want the fastest lens you can afford; in
    that length, the fastest you'll get is about f/2.8.

    Nikon D50 body: $500
    Nikkor 80-200 f/2.8 $900

    I'm sure Canon and other manufacturers have a comparable body/lens
    combination.

    --
    Joe Makowiec
    http://makowiec.org/
    Email: http://makowiec.org/contact/?Joe
     
    Joe Makowiec, Jul 12, 2006
    #4
  5. ButlerFootball

    Peter Guest

    Well, 5 frames per second is handy, combined with a good camera in other
    aspects. Of course, lens choice is critical and you can easily spend more
    on a lens than on the body itself.



    "ButlerFootball" <u24045@uwe> wrote in message news:63261185a71e6@uwe...
    > Peter wrote:
    >>Canon 20D or 30D.
    >>
    >>> Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    >>> local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the

    >>[quoted text clipped - 4 lines]
    >>>
    >>> Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

    >
    > Thanks Peter, I will take a look at those.
     
    Peter, Jul 12, 2006
    #5
  6. Joe Makowiec wrote:
    >> Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website
    >> for a local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos
    >> from the sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital
    >> camera I should get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500
    >> - $1,000 range. I am currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would
    >> like something better.

    >
    >Your budget's a bit low.
    >
    >Just about any (digital) SLR camera will do just fine. You'll want a
    >zoom which covers at least a 200mm focal length if the camera has a DX-
    >size sensor (ie most lower-end Canons, and all Nikons). And if you're
    >talking about night games, you want the fastest lens you can afford; in
    >that length, the fastest you'll get is about f/2.8.
    >
    >Nikon D50 body: $500
    >Nikkor 80-200 f/2.8 $900
    >
    >I'm sure Canon and other manufacturers have a comparable body/lens
    >combination.
    >


    Thanks, I will look into that as well.
     
    ButlerFootball, Jul 12, 2006
    #6
  7. ButlerFootball wrote:
    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website
    > for a local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos
    > from the sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital
    > camera I should get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500
    > - $1,000 range. I am currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would
    > like something better.
    >
    > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    I will have to go along with the others. You budget is a little low.
    The Canon 20D may be a god choice, hopefully the price may be down a little.
    The Rebel might work, but there are a few features and specs on the 20D that
    would be very valuable for sports. Next you need to start looking at
    lenses, and flash and that may be more than the camera. However you can at
    least get started with the camera and the kit lens.

    Assuming you can get onto the field, the kit lens would not be bad at
    all. Some of my best football (and other sports) shots were done with a 50
    mm lens on a 35mm. I did get a better then average flash however for night
    games.

    --
    Joseph Meehan

    Dia duit
     
    Joseph Meehan, Jul 12, 2006
    #7
  8. ButlerFootball

    Mark Roberts Guest

    ButlerFootball wrote:

    >Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    >local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    >sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I should
    >get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    >currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    >Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    Have a look at the new Pentax K100D. It's an SLR (interchangeable
    lenses) and has built-in image stabilization, which will be a
    particular advantage for a lot of sports photography.

    For example, see
    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/06182/702575-96.stm

    --
    Mark Roberts Photography & Multimedia
    www.robertstech.com
    412-687-2835
     
    Mark Roberts, Jul 12, 2006
    #8
  9. ButlerFootball

    Hoover Guest

    Nikon D-50 - if you have an email address i can send you some I took
    recently at the Yankees-Nationals game.

    "ButlerFootball" <u24045@uwe> wrote in message news:6325f33703fb5@uwe...
    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    > local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    > sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I
    > should
    > get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    > currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
     
    Hoover, Jul 12, 2006
    #9
  10. ButlerFootball

    Roy G Guest

    "ButlerFootball" <u24045@uwe> wrote in message news:6325f33703fb5@uwe...
    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    > local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    > sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I
    > should
    > get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    > currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    Hi.

    I am not too sure that Image Stabilisation will do very much for Sports
    Photography. Camera Shake is very likely to be much less evident than
    subject motion.

    I am inclined to suggest that it would be sensible to stay with the S5100
    meantime. 4.1 Mp is easily more than enough for Web use, and the almost
    400mm (equivalent) zoom should give plenty of reach. It is reasonably fast
    between shots, and can even take RAW images.

    In order to match that Zoom range in a DSLR, you are talking about spending
    considerably more than your budget. A long Zoom lens, or a big aperture
    Zoom might exceed that figure.

    The power Zooming on the S5100 is slower than can be achieved with a Manual
    Zooming Control, and it is poorly equiped for Flash use. Perhaps a Cordless
    Slave Flash on a bracket might help, but even the Hot Shoe Flashes for DSLRs
    could have an under powered problem on a sports field.

    Once some experience has been gained, and it is a very specialised sector,
    then the hardware can be thought about again.

    In photography it is the skill of the photographer which actually makes the
    great pictures, but too many seem to think it is the amount of expensive
    gear.

    Roy G
     
    Roy G, Jul 13, 2006
    #10
  11. ButlerFootball

    y_p_w Guest

    ButlerFootball wrote:
    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    > local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    > sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I should
    > get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    > currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    Perhaps the Olympus E-Volt cameras using the Four-Thirds lens
    system. A friend of mine is doing pretty well with one for baseball
    photos. However - it's a bit easier to frame a shot at the plate
    than it is to follow moving football players from the sideline.
     
    y_p_w, Jul 13, 2006
    #11
  12. ButlerFootball

    Annika1980 Guest

    The 20D (or the newer 30D) is a great choice, and I'll tell you why.
    Unless you'll be shooting exclusively in the daytime, your main problem
    will be the poorly lit fields the team plays on. This means you'll
    need a lens with a large aperture (f/2.8 or at the very least, f/4) and
    you'll need to use a high ISO setting. This is where the Canons excel.
    No comparable model can match the Canon's high-ISO performance.

    You may think you can cheat and simply use lower ISOs and a flash, but
    the results won't be very good. The player will look like a deer in
    the headlights and you'll get lots glowing eyeballs.

    Here's a gallery of shots I took in a game last year with my 20D:
    http://www.pbase.com/bret/mccallie

    That particular stadium is a college field and is very well lit. Most
    high school stadiums are much darker.

    Here's one from a different gallery on a typical poorly lit field:
    http://www.pbase.com/bret/image/48264968

    Note that I had to use all the tricks for this one ... f/2.8, 1600 ISO,
    and my flash as well.
    If I had lesser gear I'd have to restrict my shooting to day games,
    which are rare in these parts.
     
    Annika1980, Jul 13, 2006
    #12
  13. ButlerFootball

    y_p_w Guest

    Annika1980 wrote:

    > You may think you can cheat and simply use lower ISOs and a flash, but
    > the results won't be very good. The player will look like a deer in
    > the headlights and you'll get lots glowing eyeballs.


    Very few flashes are going to have adequate range for a
    football field from the sideline. Even if you did get
    subject in range of the flash, you'll end up with an
    oddly dim background.

    When I go to a night baseball or football game, I'll
    sometimes see flashes going off from the stands. Just
    tells me that lots of people have little idea how their
    camera works.
     
    y_p_w, Jul 13, 2006
    #13
  14. On 7/12/06 8:48 PM, y_p_w wrote:
    >
    > Annika1980 wrote:
    >
    >> You may think you can cheat and simply use lower ISOs and a flash, but
    >> the results won't be very good. The player will look like a deer in
    >> the headlights and you'll get lots glowing eyeballs.

    >
    > Very few flashes are going to have adequate range for a
    > football field from the sideline. Even if you did get
    > subject in range of the flash, you'll end up with an
    > oddly dim background.


    Most folks aren't looking for a background at a night football or
    lacrosse game.
    >
    > When I go to a night baseball or football game, I'll
    > sometimes see flashes going off from the stands. Just
    > tells me that lots of people have little idea how their
    > camera works.


    Oh, try a rock concert also, or the opening of the Olympics. Most folks
    don't know how to, or if their flash turns off.

    --
    john mcwilliams
     
    John McWilliams, Jul 13, 2006
    #14
  15. ButlerFootball

    y_p_w Guest

    John McWilliams wrote:

    > On 7/12/06 8:48 PM, y_p_w wrote:
    >
    >>Annika1980 wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>You may think you can cheat and simply use lower ISOs and a flash, but
    >>>the results won't be very good. The player will look like a deer in
    >>>the headlights and you'll get lots glowing eyeballs.

    >>
    >>Very few flashes are going to have adequate range for a
    >>football field from the sideline. Even if you did get
    >>subject in range of the flash, you'll end up with an
    >>oddly dim background.

    >
    >
    > Most folks aren't looking for a background at a night football or
    > lacrosse game.


    Sure. However - I've seen results from even a powerful
    indoor flash with sports. One player is unevenly lit,
    while teammates look really dark. Add a bit of redeye,
    and the effect is rather unnatural. The only really good
    indoor flash results I've seen are from powerful arena
    strobes. As for football from the sidelines - the field
    is 150+ feet wide, so how often is the ball carrier
    within effective flash range?

    I've been to night college football games and noted the
    camera equipment used. It's almost always prime 300+ mm
    F2.8 lenses on monopods, where the body literally hangs
    from the lens. The pro shots do look like they were
    taken at night, but they look "right" with the background
    at a reasonably bright compared to the subject.

    >>When I go to a night baseball or football game, I'll
    >>sometimes see flashes going off from the stands. Just
    >>tells me that lots of people have little idea how their
    >>camera works.

    >
    >
    > Oh, try a rock concert also, or the opening of the Olympics. Most folks
    > don't know how to, or if their flash turns off.


    Or places where flashes aren't allowed. I was at such
    a place where the PA announcement was made every two
    minutes. Of course everyone paused as the announcement
    was made, and the flashes inevitably went off as soon
    as it was over.
     
    y_p_w, Jul 13, 2006
    #15
  16. y_p_w wrote:

    > Sure. However - I've seen results from even a powerful
    > indoor flash with sports. One player is unevenly lit,
    > while teammates look really dark. Add a bit of redeye,
    > and the effect is rather unnatural. The only really good
    > indoor flash results I've seen are from powerful arena
    > strobes. As for football from the sidelines - the field
    > is 150+ feet wide, so how often is the ball carrier
    > within effective flash range?


    Try moving the flash off the camera onto a flash bracket,
    and use a better beamer (google that to see what it is).
    Flash with a telephoto and the subject at 50+ yards is
    no problem, even at low iso.

    Roger
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Jul 13, 2006
    #16
  17. ButlerFootball

    Frank ess Guest

    y_p_w wrote:
    > John McWilliams wrote:
    >
    >> On 7/12/06 8:48 PM, y_p_w wrote:
    >>
    >>> Annika1980 wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> You may think you can cheat and simply use lower ISOs and a
    >>>> flash,
    >>>> but the results won't be very good. The player will look like a
    >>>> deer in the headlights and you'll get lots glowing eyeballs.
    >>>
    >>> Very few flashes are going to have adequate range for a
    >>> football field from the sideline. Even if you did get
    >>> subject in range of the flash, you'll end up with an
    >>> oddly dim background.

    >>
    >>
    >> Most folks aren't looking for a background at a night football or
    >> lacrosse game.

    >
    > Sure. However - I've seen results from even a powerful
    > indoor flash with sports. One player is unevenly lit,
    > while teammates look really dark. Add a bit of redeye,
    > and the effect is rather unnatural. The only really good
    > indoor flash results I've seen are from powerful arena
    > strobes. As for football from the sidelines - the field
    > is 150+ feet wide, so how often is the ball carrier
    > within effective flash range?
    >
    > I've been to night college football games and noted the
    > camera equipment used. It's almost always prime 300+ mm
    > F2.8 lenses on monopods, where the body literally hangs
    > from the lens. The pro shots do look like they were
    > taken at night, but they look "right" with the background
    > at a reasonably bright compared to the subject.
    >
    >>> When I go to a night baseball or football game, I'll
    >>> sometimes see flashes going off from the stands. Just
    >>> tells me that lots of people have little idea how their
    >>> camera works.

    >>
    >>
    >> Oh, try a rock concert also, or the opening of the Olympics. Most
    >> folks don't know how to, or if their flash turns off.

    >
    > Or places where flashes aren't allowed. I was at such
    > a place where the PA announcement was made every two
    > minutes. Of course everyone paused as the announcement
    > was made, and the flashes inevitably went off as soon
    > as it was over.


    Just to give you an example of flash in a gymnasium (daytime), these
    were made with a Nikon Coolpix 995 with a Vivitar 285H (compensated
    cord) on an above-camera bracket.
    http://www.fototime.com/inv/ACC24A98C4589A9

    This kind of thing may not be to your taste, but it shows the power of
    a pretty good flash.

    I did all this before it occurred to me there might be some kind of
    rules against flash, but no one said anything to me while I was doing
    it, and the kids liked the pictures.

    --
    Frank ess
     
    Frank ess, Jul 13, 2006
    #17
  18. On Wed, 12 Jul 2006 18:57:17 GMT, "ButlerFootball" <u24045@uwe> wrote:

    >Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    >local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    >sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I should
    >get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    >currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    >Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    Canon 1DIIN.


    *****************************************************

    "It just so happens we be Texicans. Texican is nothin'
    but a human man way out on a limb, this year and next.
    Maybe for a hundred more. But I don't think it'll
    be forever. Some day, this country's gonna be a
    fine good place to be."

    "Mrs. Jorgensen"
    from "The Searchers"
     
    John A. Stovall, Jul 13, 2006
    #18
  19. ButlerFootball

    tomm42 Guest

    ButlerFootball wrote:
    > Hi, I am a novice photographer and have recently started a website for a
    > local high school football team. I plan on taking game photos from the
    > sideline this season, and would like advice on what digital camera I should
    > get to do so. I would like to stay between the $500 - $1,000 range. I am
    > currently using a Fuji Finepix S5100 and would like something better.
    >
    > Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated.


    Problem with the Fuji, it won't work well for night games, P&S cameras
    have small sensors and don't work well with high ISOs (which you will
    need).
    Get a DSLR low end Nikon, Cannon, Pentax, Sony or Olympus. Buy the
    camera new and find a used 80-200 zoom f2.8 (olympus lenses will vary
    slightly). KEH camera is a good used source. You may want to get the
    kit lens with the camera too. You should also get a good tripod, though
    your paper may have one already. With 80-200 f2.8 zooms almost any
    brand, even the 3rd party zoom are good opticly. So buy at a reputable
    camera store.
    This will but up agaisnt your upper range but will give you a very
    usable system and let you cover games at any time.

    Tom
     
    tomm42, Jul 13, 2006
    #19
  20. ButlerFootball

    Annika1980 Guest

    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark) wrote:
    > Try moving the flash off the camera onto a flash bracket,
    > and use a better beamer (google that to see what it is).
    > Flash with a telephoto and the subject at 50+ yards is
    > no problem, even at low iso.


    And I thought I was the only person to ever use a Better Beamer at a
    football game.
     
    Annika1980, Jul 13, 2006
    #20
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