Good light monopod for hiking ?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Chuck, Jun 8, 2004.

  1. Chuck

    Chuck Guest

    Hi,

    any suggestions for a good light monopod for hiking ? Or maybe a really
    ultralight tripod maybe ...

    tx

    300d
    sigma apo II 70-300
    Chuck, Jun 8, 2004
    #1
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  2. Chuck

    Chuck Guest

    Re: Good lite monopod for hiking ?

    hum , lite not light sorry , hehe
    Chuck, Jun 8, 2004
    #2
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  3. Chuck

    Mike Guest

    This one does it for me:
    Manfrotto MN679B


    "Chuck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > any suggestions for a good light monopod for hiking ? Or maybe a really
    > ultralight tripod maybe ...
    >
    > tx
    >
    > 300d
    > sigma apo II 70-300
    >
    >
    Mike, Jun 8, 2004
    #3
  4. In article <>,
    "Chuck" <> wrote:

    > Hi,
    >
    > any suggestions for a good light monopod for hiking ? Or maybe a really
    > ultralight tripod maybe ...
    >
    > tx
    >
    > 300d
    > sigma apo II 70-300


    I carry an Ultrapod. It's not much of a tripod, but more of a swivel
    mount that can be put on a rock or strapped to a tree.
    Kevin McMurtrie, Jun 8, 2004
    #4
  5. Chuck wrote:

    >any suggestions for a good light monopod for hiking ? Or maybe a really
    >ultralight tripod maybe ...


    I have been very happy using a Slik Lighty Pod II. I just finished a
    2-week vacation hiking in southern Utah, where I carried this and used
    it every day.

    It's inexpensive ($50 at B&H), and includes a small ball head. It
    extends to about 5'5" or 5'6", which puts the camera viewfinder just
    at eye height for me (6' tall), so it's comfortable to use. Though I
    do wish it had an inch or two more for portrait mode shots. It
    collapses to under 21" including the ballhead, so it easily straps to
    a back pack or fanny pack without sticking out the sides and getting
    in the way. Light weight, under 1 pound. It is quite stiff for its
    size and weight. Of course, I'm only putting 2 to 3 pounds on it (it
    is rated for 6.6 pounds, 3 kg).

    Things I would look for:
    weight,
    length fully extended,
    length collapsed,
    Smooth ball head, that can be used in landscape and portrait modes

    Many of the light weight monopods are too short, which make them
    tiring to use. Or, they are too long collapsed, so they stick out the
    side of the pack, where they bump into things.

    There are some monopods that are sold as "trekker poles". These are a
    hiking stick (kind of like ski poles), with a 1/4" screw in the
    handle. Don't bother with these. I have one, and while it's nice as a
    hiking stick, it's too thin to make a good monopod, it's not stiff
    enough. Also the one I have and the ones I have seen are two sections,
    so they don't collapse enough to easily carry strapped to a pack, and
    they don't extend enough to get the viewfinder to eye height. (In
    contrast, the Lighty Pod II is 5 sections.)

    Terry
    Terry Orchard, Jun 8, 2004
    #5
  6. Chuck

    twinzen Guest

    twinzen, Jun 8, 2004
    #6
  7. Chuck

    RustY © Guest

    Re: Good lite monopod for hiking ?

    "Chuck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > hum , lite not light sorry , hehe



    Not according to my spellchecker it's not !
    --
    For Welsh Military Flying visit .......
    www.groups.yahoo.com/group/V-A-S/
    RustY ©, Jun 8, 2004
    #7
  8. Chuck

    twinzen Guest

    Try this...

    It's called a string or chain tripod...
    Cheap and doesn't get lighter...

    A quick google search found a site that illustrates what I'm talking about.

    http://www.xs4all.nl/~wiskerke/artikelen/string.html

    I live in southern Utah, send me some links to your vacation photos.
    twinzen, Jun 8, 2004
    #8
  9. Chuck

    Chuck Guest

    tx a lot all !
    Chuck, Jun 8, 2004
    #9
  10. In article <>,
    (twinzen) wrote:

    > Try a string monopod.
    >
    > http://www.xs4all.nl/~wiskerke/artikelen/string.html


    What good would that do? The problem is rotational movement. It would
    need a rigid portion under the mount to prevent that.

    Sounds like a get-rich-quick scam.
    Kevin McMurtrie, Jun 9, 2004
    #10
  11. Chuck

    Steve Almond Guest

    "Kevin McMurtrie" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > In article <>,
    > (twinzen) wrote:
    >
    > > Try a string monopod.
    > >
    > > http://www.xs4all.nl/~wiskerke/artikelen/string.html

    >
    > What good would that do? The problem is rotational movement. It would
    > need a rigid portion under the mount to prevent that.
    >
    > Sounds like a get-rich-quick scam.


    You're dead right. The guy has made a fortune out of this. Hardly a day goes
    by without me meeting some photographer who has been fleeced by this guy.
    Some right down to their last D100.

    Steve
    Steve Almond, Jun 9, 2004
    #11
  12. Chuck

    twinzen Guest

    > > Sounds like a get-rich-quick scam.
    >
    > You're dead right. The guy has made a fortune out of this. Hardly a day goes
    > by without me meeting some photographer who has been fleeced by this guy.
    > Some right down to their last D100.
    >
    > Steve


    Why would you buy one? Just make it yourself!
    I'm not trying to market this guys stuff, what moron would buy this?

    You need a string and a screw?!

    An old prof showed me this trick and it has saved me a few time, try
    it...
    It will save you 2+ stops weighs nothing and can be made with a long
    shoestring in a pinch.

    Another plus is you can just leave it on the camera and use it more
    spontaneously (quicker to deploy)

    I'm not saying one is better than another, I use them all.
    Just trying to help.
    twinzen, Jun 9, 2004
    #12
  13. "Chuck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > any suggestions for a good light monopod for hiking ? Or maybe a really
    > ultralight tripod maybe ...


    See http://traveltripod.com

    Also, there are many collapsible walking sticks that have a 1/4" screw under
    the knob on top.
    Steven M. Scharf, Jun 9, 2004
    #13
  14. Bogen Digi 676B is whatI have. I like it. Your goingto be carrying it, but
    I use trekking poles... so no big.
    "Chuck" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi,
    >
    > any suggestions for a good light monopod for hiking ? Or maybe a really
    > ultralight tripod maybe ...
    >
    > tx
    >
    > 300d
    > sigma apo II 70-300
    >
    >
    Robert Meyers, Jun 11, 2004
    #14
  15. Chuck

    wim wiskerke Guest

    (twinzen) wrote in message news:<>...
    > > > Sounds like a get-rich-quick scam.

    > >
    > > You're dead right. The guy has made a fortune out of this. Hardly a day goes
    > > by without me meeting some photographer who has been fleeced by this guy.
    > > Some right down to their last D100.


    ROTFL!

    > Why would you buy one? Just make it yourself!
    > I'm not trying to market this guys stuff, what moron would buy this?


    I am not selling anything. Maybe I should ;-)

    Outside of the US it is impossible to get a 1/4 thumbscrew. The rest
    of the world is metric, remember. I get a lot of questions about where
    to buy a screw and since I moved from the Netherlands to DC, from time
    to time I do put a thumbscrew in an enveloppe and send it to some
    desperate photographer. (Still for free, yes.)

    > You need a string and a screw?!


    And a drill to make the hole.
    A deluxe variety is made of an old wristcord from a pocketcamera.

    > An old prof showed me this trick and it has saved me a few time, try
    > it...
    > It will save you 2+ stops weighs nothing and can be made with a long
    > shoestring in a pinch.
    >
    > Another plus is you can just leave it on the camera and use it more
    > spontaneously (quicker to deploy)


    The dutch text on my website describes the use of a short string
    attached to the photographers belt in a famous use of the contraption:
    the recording of a Nobel Prize ceremony.

    > I'm not saying one is better than another, I use them all.


    So am I.

    > Just trying to help.


    So am I ;-)

    I am in Nepal right now. I left my carbon manfrotto monopod and my
    carbon gitzo explorer tripod at home. But I did bring my *string
    monopod*.
    In addition to the string I carry a small camera clamp. Mine is from
    Rowi; when I get back I will have a look at the Clampette:
    http://mariposa.yosemite.net/hsmc/.
    I use it to attach my camera to a railing or tree or the handlebars of
    my bike. Occasionally I have used it to clamp the camera on a walking
    stick or even a bamboo pole: an improvised monopod.


    regards, wim

    --
    www.wiskerke.com
    wim wiskerke, Jun 15, 2004
    #15
  16. Chuck

    Steve Almond Guest

    Wim,

    Glad you enjoyed the humour (although some seemed to take it seriously...).
    One other advantage to the "belt" method is its anti-theft tendency. Hard to
    grab a camera that is attached to a man's pants.
    I suppose camera fairs might be a source of 1/4" screws over here in Europe?

    Steve


    "wim wiskerke" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > (twinzen) wrote in message

    news:<>...
    > > > > Sounds like a get-rich-quick scam.
    > > >
    > > > You're dead right. The guy has made a fortune out of this. Hardly a

    day goes
    > > > by without me meeting some photographer who has been fleeced by this

    guy.
    > > > Some right down to their last D100.

    >
    > ROTFL!
    >
    > > Why would you buy one? Just make it yourself!
    > > I'm not trying to market this guys stuff, what moron would buy this?

    >
    > I am not selling anything. Maybe I should ;-)
    >
    > Outside of the US it is impossible to get a 1/4 thumbscrew. The rest
    > of the world is metric, remember. I get a lot of questions about where
    > to buy a screw and since I moved from the Netherlands to DC, from time
    > to time I do put a thumbscrew in an enveloppe and send it to some
    > desperate photographer. (Still for free, yes.)
    >
    > > You need a string and a screw?!

    >
    > And a drill to make the hole.
    > A deluxe variety is made of an old wristcord from a pocketcamera.
    >
    > > An old prof showed me this trick and it has saved me a few time, try
    > > it...
    > > It will save you 2+ stops weighs nothing and can be made with a long
    > > shoestring in a pinch.
    > >
    > > Another plus is you can just leave it on the camera and use it more
    > > spontaneously (quicker to deploy)

    >
    > The dutch text on my website describes the use of a short string
    > attached to the photographers belt in a famous use of the contraption:
    > the recording of a Nobel Prize ceremony.
    >
    > > I'm not saying one is better than another, I use them all.

    >
    > So am I.
    >
    > > Just trying to help.

    >
    > So am I ;-)
    >
    > I am in Nepal right now. I left my carbon manfrotto monopod and my
    > carbon gitzo explorer tripod at home. But I did bring my *string
    > monopod*.
    > In addition to the string I carry a small camera clamp. Mine is from
    > Rowi; when I get back I will have a look at the Clampette:
    > http://mariposa.yosemite.net/hsmc/.
    > I use it to attach my camera to a railing or tree or the handlebars of
    > my bike. Occasionally I have used it to clamp the camera on a walking
    > stick or even a bamboo pole: an improvised monopod.
    >
    >
    > regards, wim
    >
    > --
    > www.wiskerke.com
    Steve Almond, Jun 15, 2004
    #16
  17. Chuck

    wim wiskerke Guest

    "Steve Almond" <> wrote in message news:<>...

    Humour is a serious thing ;-)

    > One other advantage to the "belt" method is its anti-theft tendency. Hard to
    > grab a camera that is attached to a man's pants.


    A nice solution for that might be the retractable things used for ID
    cards. Mine has a steel wire. I am not sure how to call this thing,
    but everyone in DC seems to have at least 2 of these ;-)
    In the Alps they use them for ski passes.

    > I suppose camera fairs might be a source of 1/4" screws over here in Europe?


    Yes and small trays on the counter of camera shops with a sign
    *anything 50cts*.
    Mabe a search through the drawer of aunt mary for her forgotten pocket
    camera or even disc camera will unearth something useful.

    While we're at it, has anybody actually ever seen a nylon thumbscrew?

    regards, wim

    --
    www.wiskerke.com
    wim wiskerke, Jun 16, 2004
    #17
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