good firewall

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Tom, Dec 18, 2005.

  1. Tom

    Tom Guest

    I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
    when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
    product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
    Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
    configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice is
    appreciated....

    Thanks
     
    Tom, Dec 18, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Tom

    optikl Guest

    Tom wrote:
    Any advice is
    > appreciated....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >


    It would help to know your circumstances 1st and what you need in a
    firewall.

    1. Are you using a high speed connection (Cable/DSL)?
    2. If so, are you behind a router (wired/wireless)?
    3. Are you running Windows XP?
    4. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being highest), how important to you is
    application/component control?
     
    optikl, Dec 18, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Tom

    nemo_outis Guest

    "Tom" <> wrote in
    news:kNlpf.11228$:

    > I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    > sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    > another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    > My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    > firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    > understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
    > good. Any advice is appreciated....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >



    All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    good you are changing.

    How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
    instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
    rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
    better protection.)

    Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
    therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
    virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
    better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
    antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.

    Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
    hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
    Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.

    For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
    firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
    them (outbound).

    http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm

    There is lots worth reading on this site.

    You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
    specific thread cited below:

    http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298

    It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
    is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
    ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
    preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
    packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
    have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Dec 19, 2005
    #3
  4. Tom

    Ken Guest

    nemo_outis wrote:
    > "Tom" <> wrote in
    > news:kNlpf.11228$:
    >
    >
    >>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    >>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    >>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    >>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    >>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    >>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
    >>good. Any advice is appreciated....
    >>
    >>Thanks
    >>
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    > Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    > frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    > good you are changing.
    >
    > How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
    > instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
    > rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
    > better protection.)
    >
    > Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
    > therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
    > virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
    > better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
    > antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
    >
    > Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
    > hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
    > Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.
    >
    > For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
    > firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
    > them (outbound).
    >
    > http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
    >
    > There is lots worth reading on this site.
    >
    > You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
    > specific thread cited below:
    >
    > http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
    >
    > It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
    > is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
    > ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
    > preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
    > packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
    > have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."
    >
    > Regards,


    I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here. I
    have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
    RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have been
    thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at work
    suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the setup
    and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise, although I
    would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able to access my
    computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two homes over the
    next few years and it would help to be able to keep info in just one place.

    Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus others
    I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is overkill
    for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My bottom line
    is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am willing to
    spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want to overspend.

    Ken
     
    Ken, Dec 19, 2005
    #4
  5. Tom

    nemo_outis Guest

    Ken <> wrote in
    news::

    > nemo_outis wrote:
    >> "Tom" <> wrote in
    >> news:kNlpf.11228$:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    >>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    >>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    >>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    >>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    >>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm
    >>>is good. Any advice is appreciated....
    >>>
    >>>Thanks
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    >> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    >> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    >> good you are changing.
    >>
    >> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
    >> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
    >> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can
    >> give better protection.)
    >>
    >> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box"
    >> and is therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall
    >> and anti- virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're
    >> skilled, you're better off with separates. The chance of the best
    >> firewall and the best antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
    >>
    >> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require
    >> some hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings
    >> are Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look
    >> 'n Stop.
    >>
    >> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
    >> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to
    >> bypass them (outbound).
    >>
    >> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
    >>
    >> There is lots worth reading on this site.
    >>
    >> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
    >> specific thread cited below:
    >>
    >> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
    >>
    >> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only"
    >> configuration is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router.
    >> Even the very cheap ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with
    >> just NAT are excellent at preventing **inbound** attacks; the more
    >> expensive ones add SPI (stateful packet inspection) and also features
    >> (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must have" firewall feature is high
    >> on the list of "nice-to-haves."
    >>
    >> Regards,

    >
    > I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here.
    > I have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
    > RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have
    > been thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at
    > work suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the
    > setup and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise,
    > although I would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able
    > to access my computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two
    > homes over the next few years and it would help to be able to keep
    > info in just one place.
    >
    > Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus
    > others I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is
    > overkill for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My
    > bottom line is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am
    > willing to spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want
    > to overspend.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    >



    My first thoughts are that The Cisco Pix, while lovely, really is
    overkill - sorta like driving a Porsche 911 to work :) Moreover, if you
    are keen for VPN there are quite satisfactory ways of obtaining it either
    in hardware or software (software is fine for a "reasonably small" number
    of users). See, for instance, OpenVPN at:

    http://openvpn.net/

    ....or even the primitive but serviceable built-in version in Windows.

    Nope, your netgear is entirely satisfactory for stopping incoming malware
    (backed up by Zonealarm) and Zonealarm will do a decent job of stopping
    outgoing stuff.

    Now spend some time on the weakest link in your security: you!

    Ignorance, laziness, false pride, and carelessness will be the downfall
    of us all - technology just lets us get it done a little faster :)

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Dec 19, 2005
    #5
  6. Tom

    nemo_outis Guest

    Ken <> wrote in
    news::

    > nemo_outis wrote:
    >> "Tom" <> wrote in
    >> news:kNlpf.11228$:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    >>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    >>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    >>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    >>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    >>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm
    >>>is good. Any advice is appreciated....
    >>>
    >>>Thanks
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    >> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    >> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    >> good you are changing.
    >>
    >> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
    >> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
    >> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can
    >> give better protection.)
    >>
    >> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box"
    >> and is therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall
    >> and anti- virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're
    >> skilled, you're better off with separates. The chance of the best
    >> firewall and the best antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
    >>
    >> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require
    >> some hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings
    >> are Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look
    >> 'n Stop.
    >>
    >> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
    >> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to
    >> bypass them (outbound).
    >>
    >> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
    >>
    >> There is lots worth reading on this site.
    >>
    >> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
    >> specific thread cited below:
    >>
    >> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
    >>
    >> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only"
    >> configuration is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router.
    >> Even the very cheap ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with
    >> just NAT are excellent at preventing **inbound** attacks; the more
    >> expensive ones add SPI (stateful packet inspection) and also features
    >> (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must have" firewall feature is high
    >> on the list of "nice-to-haves."
    >>
    >> Regards,

    >
    > I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here.
    > I have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
    > RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have
    > been thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at
    > work suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the
    > setup and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise,
    > although I would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able
    > to access my computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two
    > homes over the next few years and it would help to be able to keep
    > info in just one place.
    >
    > Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus
    > others I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is
    > overkill for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My
    > bottom line is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am
    > willing to spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want
    > to overspend.
    >
    > Ken
    >
    >



    My first thoughts are that The Cisco Pix, while lovely, really is
    overkill - sorta like driving a Porsche 911 to work :) Moreover, if you
    are keen for VPN there are quite satisfactory ways of obtaining it either
    in hardware or software (software is fine for a "reasonably small" number
    of users). See, for instance, OpenVPN at:

    http://openvpn.net/

    ....or even the primitive but serviceable built-in version in Windows.

    Nope, your netgear is entirely satisfactory for stopping incoming malware
    (backed up by Zonealarm) and Zonealarm will do a decent job of stopping
    outgoing stuff.

    Now spend some time on the weakest link in your security: you!

    Ignorance, laziness, false pride, and carelessness will be the downfall
    of us all - technology just lets us get it done a little faster :)

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Dec 19, 2005
    #6
  7. Tom

    Tom Guest

    I am running XP Pro on a small home network. I have a DLink DI-524 wireless
    router. However only one of the 3 computers are wireless. Two of them are
    wired and one is wireless. I have all three online, but they cannot see each
    other, which is another issue. I have a DSL connection and i would say a 2
    or 3 on control. I do not want so much funtionality that i have to set each
    site, if ya know what i mean. I want pretty much to install it and know i am
    protected....thanks for the help and advice....


    "optikl" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Tom wrote:
    > Any advice is
    > > appreciated....
    > >
    > > Thanks
    > >
    > >

    >
    > It would help to know your circumstances 1st and what you need in a
    > firewall.
    >
    > 1. Are you using a high speed connection (Cable/DSL)?
    > 2. If so, are you behind a router (wired/wireless)?
    > 3. Are you running Windows XP?
    > 4. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being highest), how important to you is
    > application/component control?
     
    Tom, Dec 19, 2005
    #7
  8. Tom

    Ken Ward Guest

    On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 21:09:34 -0800, Ken <> wrote:

    >nemo_outis wrote:
    >> "Tom" <> wrote in
    >> news:kNlpf.11228$:
    >>
    >>
    >>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    >>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    >>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    >>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    >>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    >>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
    >>>good. Any advice is appreciated....
    >>>
    >>>Thanks
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    >> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    >> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    >> good you are changing.
    >>
    >> How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
    >> instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
    >> rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
    >> better protection.)
    >>
    >> Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
    >> therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
    >> virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
    >> better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
    >> antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
    >>
    >> Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
    >> hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
    >> Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.
    >>
    >> For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
    >> firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
    >> them (outbound).
    >>
    >> http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
    >>
    >> There is lots worth reading on this site.
    >>
    >> You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
    >> specific thread cited below:
    >>
    >> http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
    >>
    >> It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
    >> is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
    >> ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
    >> preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
    >> packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
    >> have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."
    >>
    >> Regards,

    >
    >I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here. I
    >have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
    >RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have been
    >thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at work
    >suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the setup
    >and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise, although I
    >would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able to access my
    >computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two homes over the
    >next few years and it would help to be able to keep info in just one place.
    >
    >Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus others
    >I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is overkill
    >for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My bottom line
    >is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am willing to
    >spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want to overspend.
    >
    >Ken

    If you are already using Netgear, what about the Netgear FR114P?
    http://www.netgear.com/products/details/FR114P.php
     
    Ken Ward, Dec 19, 2005
    #8
  9. Tom

    Ken Guest

    Ken Ward wrote:
    > On Sun, 18 Dec 2005 21:09:34 -0800, Ken <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>nemo_outis wrote:
    >>
    >>>"Tom" <> wrote in
    >>>news:kNlpf.11228$:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    >>>>sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    >>>>another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    >>>>My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    >>>>firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    >>>>understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is
    >>>>good. Any advice is appreciated....
    >>>>
    >>>>Thanks
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    >>>Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    >>>frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    >>>good you are changing.
    >>>
    >>>How skilled are you and how much work are you willing to do? (For
    >>>instance, application-based is the easiest and gives good protection;
    >>>rules-based is configurable, takes more skill, but ultimately can give
    >>>better protection.)
    >>>
    >>>Zonealarm is a very good firewall when used "right out of the box" and is
    >>>therefore a good choice for the unskilled or busy. Firewall and anti-
    >>>virus all-in-ones are popular these days, but if you're skilled, you're
    >>>better off with separates. The chance of the best firewall and the best
    >>>antivirus coming from the same vendor are slim.
    >>>
    >>>Other firewalls, however, are even better than Zonealarm but require some
    >>>hands-on configuration. Among the best in independent ratings are
    >>>Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.
    >>>
    >>>For instance, the site below (depsite being a little dated) tests
    >>>firewalls against a number of severe compromise strategies used to bypass
    >>>them (outbound).
    >>>
    >>>http://www.firewallleaktester.com/tests.htm
    >>>
    >>>There is lots worth reading on this site.
    >>>
    >>>You might also enjoy the discussions at this sitte, including the
    >>>specific thread cited below:
    >>>
    >>>http://www.wilderssecurity.com/showthread.php?p=630298
    >>>
    >>>It is my personal belief that any "software firewall only" configuration
    >>>is deficient; you MUST also use hardware: a router. Even the very cheap
    >>>ones (from folks like Linksys and D-link) with just NAT are excellent at
    >>>preventing **inbound** attacks; the more expensive ones add SPI (stateful
    >>>packet inspection) and also features (e.g., VPN). SPI, while not a "must
    >>>have" firewall feature is high on the list of "nice-to-haves."
    >>>
    >>>Regards,

    >>
    >>I was going to ask a similar question so perhaps I can join in here. I
    >>have a home LAN connected to the internet through a router (Netgear
    >>RT314) protected only with Zona Alarm Pro on each computer. I have been
    >>thinking about adding a hardware firewall and our IT person at work
    >>suggested Cisco Pix 501. While the cost is not prohibitive, the setup
    >>and maintenance is probably above my level of expertise, although I
    >>would be willing to learn. I like the idea of being able to access my
    >>computer with a VPN, as I will be traveling between two homes over the
    >>next few years and it would help to be able to keep info in just one place.
    >>
    >>Do you have any thoughts about the Cisco hardware firewall versus others
    >>I might want to look at in the up to $400-500 range? If it is overkill
    >>for what I have outlined, what else should I consider? My bottom line
    >>is that I am very concerned about identity theft so I am willing to
    >>spend what it takes to make myself secure but I don't want to overspend.
    >>
    >>Ken

    >
    > If you are already using Netgear, what about the Netgear FR114P?
    > http://www.netgear.com/products/details/FR114P.php
    >

    I will check into this equipment. I am not wedded to Netgear; I
    happened to have purchased it years ago because it allowed for an easy
    port forwarding setup, which I needed at the time. I also use Buffalo
    Tech for my wireless bridge (two WBR G54s), two Linksys switches, and a
    Linksys wireless router/switch as a wireless access piont), so you can
    see I am not wedded to Netgear. Linksys usually tests pretty well in
    the magazines, although I am not sure how honest the testing is. As
    Linksys is a Cisco company, however, perhaps they have some equipment
    worth looking at that would allow for a VPN?

    Thanks
    Ken
     
    Ken, Dec 19, 2005
    #9
  10. Tom

    icono Guest

    "Tom" <> wrote in message
    news:kNlpf.11228$...
    >I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
    > when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
    > product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    > My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
    > Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
    > configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice
    > is
    > appreciated....
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >


    There are several great answers already given.

    The PRIMARY thing you need to do is try very hard to remove all traces of
    Norton. You probably wont be able to do such, but try. I have seen (not my
    computer) where even using their special program (SymNRT) for removal,
    cleaning the registry (required because they flat out LIE about the
    removal), and using an Xp repair mode, the computer still thinks it has a
    Norton Firewall.

    My own personal one is System Suite by VCOM. It seems to work and has
    several other neat capabilities. That and running through a router that has
    its own firewall seems to work quite well as I get into some areas and
    interchange while interacting with other computer systems that I find are
    bad at best.

    As a result of helping others with computer problems (for pay naturally), I
    have learned to avoid like the plague, Norton and MacAfee. It's sort of
    like, If it comes free on a new computer and you activate it, you've been
    had.
     
    icono, Dec 19, 2005
    #10
  11. Tom

    traveler 66 Guest

    On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 01:43:03 -0500, Tom wrote:

    > I am running XP Pro on a small home network. I have a DLink DI-524 wireless
    > router. However only one of the 3 computers are wireless. Two of them are
    > wired and one is wireless. I have all three online, but they cannot see each
    > other, which is another issue. I have a DSL connection and i would say a 2
    > or 3 on control. I do not want so much funtionality that i have to set each
    > site, if ya know what i mean. I want pretty much to install it and know i am
    > protected....thanks for the help and advice....
    >
    > "optikl" <> wrote in message
    > news:...


    Try kerio firewall, it's free won't slow down your computer, but needs to
    be set up with permissions, you can do that at www.grc.com if your new.
    It's on the same quality scale as the free zone alarm, but doesn¢t slow you
    down and doesn¢t leak. It keeps track of each program you let through for
    any changes, etc, in case a trojan tries to impersonate a permission, so
    does zone alarm.

    If you have $100 and maybe less? Get alpha shield, it's the best hardware
    firewall for the money I've seen, look on their page, www.alphashield.com

    Regards




    >> Tom wrote:
    >> Any advice is
    >>> appreciated....
    >>>
    >>> Thanks
    >>>
    >>>

    >>
    >> It would help to know your circumstances 1st and what you need in a
    >> firewall.
    >>
    >> 1. Are you using a high speed connection (Cable/DSL)?
    >> 2. If so, are you behind a router (wired/wireless)?
    >> 3. Are you running Windows XP?
    >> 4. On a scale of 1-5 (5 being highest), how important to you is
    >> application/component control?
     
    traveler 66, Dec 20, 2005
    #11
  12. Tom

    Robsten Guest

    Skribent 2005-12-18, Tom :
    > I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However
    > sometimes when i install another Norton component it conflicts with
    > another Norton product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    > My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch
    > firewalls. Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to
    > understand and configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm
    > is good. Any advice is appreciated....


    > Thanks


    Use Sygate, free good and reliable, I promise. Sorry, Symantec has
    bought Sygate, forget it.


    --
    http://web.comhem.se/~u85329080/
    http://robsten.blogspot.com/
    Robsten / And I don.t play golf!
     
    Robsten, Dec 24, 2005
    #12
  13. > All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    > Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    > frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    > good you are changing.
    >
    > Among the best in independent ratings are
    > Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n Stop.


    I am currently running Norton Internet Security. As it's one of the biggest
    names about in security, it's the on I initially opted for. With my
    subcription coming to an end and a move to a brand new system, I'm
    considering a change, if there is something more powerful out there.

    I gave the LooknStop firewall a try and it seems pretty good.

    With it only being under a few hundred Kb in size, it can't be much of a
    drain on system resources?

    If I was to continue with LooknStop, what is considered the best standalone
    antivirus package. Currently using Norton as part of Internet Security along
    with AVG.
     
    Midnight Moocher, Dec 28, 2005
    #13
  14. Tom

    nemo_outis Guest

    "Midnight Moocher" <> wrote in
    news:uGAsf.51375$:

    >> All Norton products (with a few exceptions such as older versions of
    >> Ghost) are bloatware, put down deep roots, are hard to remove, and
    >> frequently give rise to strange conflicts with other software. It is
    >> good you are changing.
    >>
    >> Among the best in independent ratings are
    >> Agnitum Outpost, and the even-less-known-but-highest-rated Look 'n
    >> Stop.

    >
    > I am currently running Norton Internet Security. As it's one of the
    > biggest names about in security, it's the on I initially opted for.
    > With my subcription coming to an end and a move to a brand new system,
    > I'm considering a change, if there is something more powerful out
    > there.
    >
    > I gave the LooknStop firewall a try and it seems pretty good.
    >
    > With it only being under a few hundred Kb in size, it can't be much of
    > a drain on system resources?
    >
    > If I was to continue with LooknStop, what is considered the best
    > standalone antivirus package. Currently using Norton as part of
    > Internet Security along with AVG.
    >
    >
    >




    In terms of the engine Kaspersky can't be beat. However, it has a geeky
    interface, takes a fair amount of hands-on, is a bit on the slow side (I
    do full scans overnight, not real-time), is not particularly lightweight
    (the Pro is supposedly lighter than standard), and some aspects (e.g.,
    the use of ADS tagging - although it can be turned off) drive folks mad.
    It isn't particularly cheap either. But for sheer effectiveness, it's
    tops. You can forgive a lot of quirks to get raw power if you're a geek
    like I am, but it's *definitely* not everyone's cup of tea.

    I've heard good things about NOD32 (lightweight, fast, and effective)
    although some also like AVG and Avast (freebie versions available)
    although I haven't used them.

    Remember, you don't need the "best" AV (I doubt there is one "best" AV),
    you just need one in the top half-dozen or so that matches your needs and
    which you can and will use regularly and keep configured properly.

    But for concreteness I'd recommend using the trial version of NOD32 for a
    bit and see if it meets your needs. Move on if it doesn't.

    Regards,
     
    nemo_outis, Dec 28, 2005
    #14
  15. Tom

    Notan Guest

    Tom wrote:
    >
    > I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
    > when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
    > product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    > My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
    > Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
    > configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice is
    > appreciated....


    Kerio Personal Firewall was recently acquired by Sunbelt Software, and is
    currently being offered for $14.95. (I paid $45.00. Damn! <g>)

    Have a look at http://www.sunbelt-software.com/kerio.cfm.

    Notan
     
    Notan, Dec 28, 2005
    #15
  16. Tom

    Not Me Guest

    Notan wrote:
    >
    > Tom wrote:
    > >
    > > I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
    > > when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
    > > product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    > > My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
    > > Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
    > > configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice is
    > > appreciated....

    >
    > Kerio Personal Firewall was recently acquired by Sunbelt Software, and is
    > currently being offered for $14.95. (I paid $45.00. Damn! <g>)
    >
    > Have a look at http://www.sunbelt-software.com/kerio.cfm.
    >
    > Notan


    For anyone using win98se use Kerio Personal Firewall v2.1.5.0. it's free
    for personal use (used to be0 and you'll probably find it if you look
    hard enough. It's very efficient and configurable.
     
    Not Me, Jan 2, 2006
    #16
  17. Tom

    Notan Guest

    Not Me wrote:
    >
    > Notan wrote:
    > >
    > > Tom wrote:
    > > >
    > > > I have been using Norton for all my computer protection. However sometimes
    > > > when i install another Norton component it conflicts with another Norton
    > > > product. Some are very difficult to remove.
    > > > My subscriptions have almost ran out and i am looking to switch firewalls.
    > > > Can someone suggest a reliable firewall that is easy to understand and
    > > > configure? I have heard from friends that Zone Alarm is good. Any advice is
    > > > appreciated....

    > >
    > > Kerio Personal Firewall was recently acquired by Sunbelt Software, and is
    > > currently being offered for $14.95. (I paid $45.00. Damn! <g>)
    > >
    > > Have a look at http://www.sunbelt-software.com/kerio.cfm.
    > >
    > > Notan

    >
    > For anyone using win98se use Kerio Personal Firewall v2.1.5.0. it's free
    > for personal use (used to be0 and you'll probably find it if you look
    > hard enough. It's very efficient and configurable.


    For v2.1.5, go to http://www.kerio.com/new/kpf_download.html.

    Notan
     
    Notan, Jan 2, 2006
    #17
  18. Tom

    Ron Lopshire Guest

    Not Me wrote:

    > For anyone using win98se use Kerio Personal Firewall v2.1.5.0. it's free
    > for personal use (used to be0 and you'll probably find it if you look
    > hard enough. It's very efficient and configurable.


    There was a thread in the c.s.f NG last week about KPF 2.1.5 not being
    able to handle fragmented packets. Not a problem with KPF 4.n, now in
    the Sunbelt family of products. Many people who use KPF 2.1.5 add
    CHX-I to handle this problem.

    Ron :)
     
    Ron Lopshire, Jan 2, 2006
    #18
  19. Tom

    optikl Guest

    Not Me wrote:

    >
    > For anyone using win98se use Kerio Personal Firewall v2.1.5.0. it's free
    > for personal use (used to be0 and you'll probably find it if you look
    > hard enough. It's very efficient and configurable.


    Or, if you really want an ageless, priceless gem, look for AtGuard
    3.22u. It's still out there and requires no registration, from what I
    can see. If you're one of those who just has to have content blocking,
    you can get updates for AtGuard privacy rules:
    https://netfiles.uiuc.edu/ehowes/www/resource.htm#AGNIS
     
    optikl, Jan 2, 2006
    #19
  20. Tom

    Not Me Guest

    Ron Lopshire wrote:
    >
    > Not Me wrote:
    >
    > > For anyone using win98se use Kerio Personal Firewall v2.1.5.0. it's free
    > > for personal use (used to be0 and you'll probably find it if you look
    > > hard enough. It's very efficient and configurable.

    >
    > There was a thread in the c.s.f NG last week about KPF 2.1.5 not being
    > able to handle fragmented packets. Not a problem with KPF 4.n, now in
    > the Sunbelt family of products. Many people who use KPF 2.1.5 add
    > CHX-I to handle this problem.
    >
    > Ron :)


    Is this applicable to older OSes, such as win98se? Or just ot XP. Are
    there any firewall testing sites to check this out. I've tried a few
    (ok, a year back0 and the above kerio came through ok.
     
    Not Me, Jan 2, 2006
    #20
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