Good Career Choice?

Discussion in 'A+ Certification' started by Sandra, Oct 7, 2003.

  1. Sandra

    Sandra Guest

    I am considering a career as a computer technician. Can any one give
    me any advice or hints that might help in making my decision? Where
    do I need to start?

    Thank you,
    Sandra, Oct 7, 2003
    #1
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  2. In my opinion, if in your area there is a large need of it, go for it, but
    most markets are sort of saturated right now so the salary's are dropping or
    at least not increasing. Took me about 20 applications to find the job I'm
    at now and 2 months. I only received maybe 3 phone calls from those 20
    applications and I have about 5 years professional and 15 non professional
    (student age, helping friend's type thing which mean diddly) experience in
    computers. If you are looking into it as a change of career, save the $400
    and go to bartending school (you'll probably make more too from disgruntled
    computer people), more of a need for that in most towns I think, or work on
    upgrading your skills in your chosen field. If you are 17-19 and want to go
    into computers, even some help desk jobs now a days want people with
    Bachelors Degrees plus MCSE/A+ to tell people how to type their password
    correctly, go to college get the knowledge and the degree. Or try the
    military for your computer education, you get educated, money, food, (if
    your lucky a chance to see parts of the world) and when you get out, you
    have GI Bill to go to school to get a more formal education.

    Again, just my opinion.

    Philip


    "Sandra" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I am considering a career as a computer technician. Can any one give
    > me any advice or hints that might help in making my decision? Where
    > do I need to start?
    >
    > Thank you,
    C. Philip Cutler II, Oct 7, 2003
    #2
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  3. Sandra

    Guest


    >I am considering a career as a computer technician. Can any one give
    >me any advice or hints that might help in making my decision? Where
    >do I need to start?
    >
    >Thank you,



    Well if your looking for a low paying job if you could find one at all
    then go for the A+ Cert. What I would recommend is go to a CC and get
    an AS degree then get your A+ Cert.

    Gary
    , Oct 7, 2003
    #3
  4. Sandra

    MartyM Guest

    Make a few phone calls to your local headhunters and ask about pay
    rates, how much demand for techies and the necessary qualifications.
    If you're going into a particular field this will give you the real
    picture.

    Marty


    On 7 Oct 2003 10:15:10 -0700, (Sandra) wrote:

    >I am considering a career as a computer technician. Can any one give
    >me any advice or hints that might help in making my decision? Where

    MartyM
    any junk email sent to my address constitutes permission
    to use the sender's computer for any purpose I desire.
    MartyM, Oct 8, 2003
    #4
  5. Sandra

    techshare Guest

    Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math and
    lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks at
    MIT, loser!
    "Developwebsites" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > >What I would recommend is go to a CC and get
    > >an AS degree then get your A+ Cert.

    >
    > get an AOS or AAS not AS.
    > AS is for those who want to go on to BA/BS, you learn nothing! its just

    math
    > and lib arts.
    > or go to vocational/tech school if u want to learn just the trade. if you

    want
    > to worship Rigoberta Menchu, Alex Haley, and Noam Chomsky, then go to a

    liberal
    > arts "college".
    >
    > --------------------------------------------------
    > remove *batSPAM* to e-mail me
    > --------------------------------------------------
    techshare, Oct 8, 2003
    #5
  6. On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 02:28:28 GMT, "mark mandel" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Sandra" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> I am considering a career as a computer technician. Can any one give
    >> me any advice or hints that might help in making my decision? Where
    >> do I need to start?
    >>
    >> Thank you,

    >
    >Funny, I too thought of doing the same. Actually it would have been a
    >career "addition" because I'm already self employed as a PIANO technician.
    >But being sellf-employed means that one too often is at the mercy of the
    >always changing economy and public tastes so that it pretty much becomes a
    >"feast and famine" sort of thing. So quite recently I went to a school
    >specializing in the A+ Certification but I consider this really a hobby for
    >now. Quite shortly I intend joining a local computer club where I may luck
    >out and network with people who could help if I decide I wanted to this
    >professionally.
    >
    >Mark Mandell
    >
    >RTT(Registered Tuner/Technician)
    >


    You might be interested in hearing that a guy posting in the
    sci.electronics.design group a few months back was working on a design
    for a self-tuning piano. It electronically monitors the pitch, and
    alternately heats or cools down the strings to get them to expand or
    contract.

    Tom
    Tom MacIntyre, Oct 9, 2003
    #6
  7. Sandra

    jonny bravo Guest

    "techshare" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math and
    > lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks at
    > MIT, loser!


    The flaming asshole speaks....

    --
    Jonny Bravo
    Some Do, Some Don't, Some Will, Some Won't...I Might...



    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 10/6/2003
    jonny bravo, Oct 9, 2003
    #7
  8. Sandra

    techshare Guest

    Again, whatever! Do you even have a BSCS? I graduated in '97 with a BSCS ...
    so don't bother lying to us all if you are sitting there with your HS
    diploma (or GED!).
    "jonny bravo" <> wrote in message
    news:hxfhb.10$P%...
    >
    > "techshare" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math

    and
    > > lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks

    at
    > > MIT, loser!

    >
    > The flaming asshole speaks....
    >
    > --
    > Jonny Bravo
    > Some Do, Some Don't, Some Will, Some Won't...I Might...
    >
    >
    >
    > ---
    > Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
    > Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    > Version: 6.0.524 / Virus Database: 321 - Release Date: 10/6/2003
    >
    >
    techshare, Oct 9, 2003
    #8
  9. On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 21:25:34 GMT, "JBS" <>
    wrote:

    >Dude!! Get some insoles. That's not what he said. He said to go for the
    >Associate in Applied Science (AAS), rather than an AA or AS degree. The AAS
    >is a standalone vocational or technical degree. The AA and AS are usually
    >preparatory degrees for entering bachelors programs and they concentrate on
    >general education requirements.


    I am still wondering what is wrong with a bit of liberal arts. I had a
    BA in Music and had completed half of a Diploma in Electronics
    Engineering Technology (probably similar to an AAS, and which I later
    completed) when I got my first technical job, with our national
    broadcaster the CBC, as a radio control room technician. I was told
    later that the BA degree was a clincher, because they look at their
    technicians as a pool of future directing and production candidates,
    and they want people in those positions to have an above average
    ability with written communications. Of course, things change; that
    was 23 years ago.

    Tom

    >
    >
    >"techshare" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math and
    >> lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks at
    >> MIT, loser!

    >
    Tom MacIntyre, Oct 9, 2003
    #9
  10. On Thu, 09 Oct 2003 00:35:01 GMT, "mark mandel" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >"Tom MacIntyre" <> wrote in message
    >news:...
    >> On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 02:28:28 GMT, "mark mandel" <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >> >
    >> >"Sandra" <> wrote in message
    >> >news:...
    >> >> I am considering a career as a computer technician. Can any one give
    >> >> me any advice or hints that might help in making my decision? Where
    >> >> do I need to start?
    >> >>
    >> >> Thank you,
    >> >
    >> >Funny, I too thought of doing the same. Actually it would have been a
    >> >career "addition" because I'm already self employed as a PIANO

    >technician.
    >> >But being sellf-employed means that one too often is at the mercy of the
    >> >always changing economy and public tastes so that it pretty much becomes

    >a
    >> >"feast and famine" sort of thing. So quite recently I went to a school
    >> >specializing in the A+ Certification but I consider this really a hobby

    >for
    >> >now. Quite shortly I intend joining a local computer club where I may

    >luck
    >> >out and network with people who could help if I decide I wanted to this
    >> >professionally.
    >> >
    >> >Mark Mandell
    >> >
    >> >RTT(Registered Tuner/Technician)
    >> >

    >>
    >> You might be interested in hearing that a guy posting in the
    >> sci.electronics.design group a few months back was working on a design
    >> for a self-tuning piano. It electronically monitors the pitch, and
    >> alternately heats or cools down the strings to get them to expand or
    >> contract.
    >>
    >> Tom

    >
    >Yeah, I heard about that some time ago but the likely problems one would
    >have with that would pretty much guarantee it ain't goin' anywhere!(of
    >course my livelihood depends on it not succeeding as well! :)
    >
    >Mark
    >


    A lot of the guys in the group were impressed, and that includes a few
    musicians, and the bulk of regular posters there are sharp with
    regards to electronics (so, if they are #, should they be heated or
    cooled to get them to proper pitch? :). It would be an expensive
    device, outside of the normal consumer range I would think, so it
    would depend on what your market is. Also...a place like Carnegie
    Hall, etc., would likely never go for such technological change
    anyway. Good idea, though...

    Tom
    Tom MacIntyre, Oct 9, 2003
    #10
  11. Sandra

    jab3 Guest

    techshare wrote:

    > Again, whatever! Do you even have a BSCS? I graduated in '97 with a BSCS
    > ... so don't bother lying to us all if you are sitting there with your HS
    > diploma (or GED!).
    > "jonny bravo" <> wrote in message
    > news:hxfhb.10$P%...
    >>
    >> "techshare" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math

    > and
    >> > lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks

    > at
    >> > MIT, loser!

    >>
    >> The flaming asshole speaks....
    >>


    Dude - he said that the AS is nothing but lib. arts/math. Not the BSCS.
    jab3, Oct 10, 2003
    #11
  12. Sandra

    techshare Guest

    Dude, why don't you go back and smoke the rest of that joint ... A BS would
    ALWAYS have the most liberal arts. Also, it's always a full four year
    program. Dude, try to "do the math".

    To those that aren't smoking dope ... WTF does AS mean to a choosy employer
    anyway? A Bachelor's degree IS a "degree". In fact, this would be the
    minimum to call yourself a formal (along with informal) engineer, computer
    scientist, software developer, etc. Ya'll can live in a fantasy world ...
    but in a tough market like this it will work like that more often than not.
    I have certifications ... but I've never landed a position from a
    certification alone. It's the combination of real experience,
    certifications, and at least a Bachelor's degree that puts you somewhere in
    the "top of the heap".
    "jab3" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > techshare wrote:
    >
    > > Again, whatever! Do you even have a BSCS? I graduated in '97 with a BSCS
    > > ... so don't bother lying to us all if you are sitting there with your

    HS
    > > diploma (or GED!).
    > > "jonny bravo" <> wrote in message
    > > news:hxfhb.10$P%...
    > >>
    > >> "techshare" <> wrote in message
    > >> news:...
    > >> > Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math

    > > and
    > >> > lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the

    folks
    > > at
    > >> > MIT, loser!
    > >>
    > >> The flaming asshole speaks....
    > >>

    >
    > Dude - he said that the AS is nothing but lib. arts/math. Not the BSCS.
    >
    techshare, Oct 10, 2003
    #12
  13. Sandra

    techshare Guest

    You know how it's always been in the computer field. Everyone thinks it
    should be easy point and click. If you want to be an attorney you'd normally
    have to get a Bachelor's degree and then finish law school. If you want to
    be a doctor ... well you know the rest.

    However, in the computer field we have "wiz kids", "experienced
    professionals", and other sorts of self proclaimed experts. Some of these
    people choose to go a traditional "route" ... but others just can't
    understand why a few certifications and maybe a technical college degree
    won't make them a bunch of money. After all, it used to! Then again, there
    used to be a lot of technical jobs "held" by Americans. I guess it's easier
    to have silly Indians do work previously done by self taught American
    "geniuses". Yeah, it must be easier since I just can't remember the last
    time I ran into a doctor or a lawyer on an H1-B work visa.

    Here is something funny about today's tech job scene. I see so many postings
    that state requirements for a BS or BSCS. I remember back in the late 90's
    .... there were SO many positions filled with uneducated people. If you had
    just graduated with a BSCS you were screwed. If you landed a position, the
    "word on the street" was to never lead on that you were a college graduate
    because this offended all those that weren't. What a joke! Well, at least
    most of those chumps are long since unemployed.

    "Tom MacIntyre" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On Wed, 08 Oct 2003 21:25:34 GMT, "JBS" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Dude!! Get some insoles. That's not what he said. He said to go for the
    > >Associate in Applied Science (AAS), rather than an AA or AS degree. The

    AAS
    > >is a standalone vocational or technical degree. The AA and AS are usually
    > >preparatory degrees for entering bachelors programs and they concentrate

    on
    > >general education requirements.

    >
    > I am still wondering what is wrong with a bit of liberal arts. I had a
    > BA in Music and had completed half of a Diploma in Electronics
    > Engineering Technology (probably similar to an AAS, and which I later
    > completed) when I got my first technical job, with our national
    > broadcaster the CBC, as a radio control room technician. I was told
    > later that the BA degree was a clincher, because they look at their
    > technicians as a pool of future directing and production candidates,
    > and they want people in those positions to have an above average
    > ability with written communications. Of course, things change; that
    > was 23 years ago.
    >
    > Tom
    >
    > >
    > >
    > >"techshare" <> wrote in message
    > >news:...
    > >> Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math

    and
    > >> lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks

    at
    > >> MIT, loser!

    > >

    >
    techshare, Oct 10, 2003
    #13
  14. Sandra

    jab3 Guest

    techshare wrote:

    > Dude, why don't you go back and smoke the rest of that joint ... A BS
    > would ALWAYS have the most liberal arts. Also, it's always a full four
    > year program. Dude, try to "do the math".
    >


    I was only clarifying what the other guy said. Also, are you saying a BS
    ALWAYS has more liberal arts courses than a BA? (yes there are colleges
    that offer a BA in Computer Science)


    jab3


    btw, I did finish the joint - it was a hog and it was the diggidy-dank.
    jab3, Oct 10, 2003
    #14
  15. On Thu, 09 Oct 2003 21:14:24 -0400, jab3 <> wrote:

    >techshare wrote:
    >
    >> Again, whatever! Do you even have a BSCS? I graduated in '97 with a BSCS
    >> ... so don't bother lying to us all if you are sitting there with your HS
    >> diploma (or GED!).
    >> "jonny bravo" <> wrote in message
    >> news:hxfhb.10$P%...
    >>>
    >>> "techshare" <> wrote in message
    >>> news:...
    >>> > Well, that is bad advice and utter nonsense! A BSCS in not just "math

    >> and
    >>> > lib arts". WTF do you come up with this stuff?! Tell that to the folks

    >> at
    >>> > MIT, loser!
    >>>
    >>> The flaming asshole speaks....
    >>>

    >
    >Dude - he said that the AS is nothing but lib. arts/math. Not the BSCS.


    I am an advocate of applied science as well, but I still see nothing
    wrong with liberal arts...or math.

    Tom
    Tom MacIntyre, Oct 11, 2003
    #15
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