gizmo

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by tony cooper, Feb 10, 2009.

  1. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    At the Mt Dora Art Festival this past weekend, a guy had this set-up
    to mechanically record some sort of panoramic view of the crowds
    (estimated attendance 250,000 to 300,00):

    http://tonycooper.fileave.com/camera.jpg

    He had it set up on the top of some steps to a building where it could
    shoot the crowds at the center of the festival. He said it would
    take 8 or 9 hours to download the images, but I forgot to ask how the
    images are stored.

    This isn't my type of thing, so it may be old hat to everyone else
    here. I'm posting it because I thought the gear-heads might be
    interested.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 10, 2009
    #1
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  2. tony cooper

    nospam Guest

    In article <>, tony cooper
    <> wrote:

    > At the Mt Dora Art Festival this past weekend, a guy had this set-up
    > to mechanically record some sort of panoramic view of the crowds
    > (estimated attendance 250,000 to 300,00):
    >
    > http://tonycooper.fileave.com/camera.jpg
    >
    > He had it set up on the top of some steps to a building where it could
    > shoot the crowds at the center of the festival. He said it would
    > take 8 or 9 hours to download the images, but I forgot to ask how the
    > images are stored.
    >
    > This isn't my type of thing, so it may be old hat to everyone else
    > here. I'm posting it because I thought the gear-heads might be
    > interested.


    it's a gigapan.

    <http://www.gigapansystems.com/mm5/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=G
    S&Product_Code=I-E1&Category_Code=GPI>
     
    nospam, Feb 10, 2009
    #2
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  3. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 14:16:16 -0600, Rich <> wrote:

    >tony cooper <> wrote in
    >news::
    >
    >> At the Mt Dora Art Festival this past weekend, a guy had this set-up
    >> to mechanically record some sort of panoramic view of the crowds
    >> (estimated attendance 250,000 to 300,00):
    >>
    >> http://tonycooper.fileave.com/camera.jpg
    >>
    >> He had it set up on the top of some steps to a building where it could
    >> shoot the crowds at the center of the festival. He said it would
    >> take 8 or 9 hours to download the images, but I forgot to ask how the
    >> images are stored.
    >>
    >> This isn't my type of thing, so it may be old hat to everyone else
    >> here. I'm posting it because I thought the gear-heads might be
    >> interested.
    >>

    >
    >All that and he couples a crap P&S to it? You could do it as well with a
    >rock tumbler, or a cheap astronomical telescope mount. However the trigger
    >mechanism (for the shutter) you'd have to do yourself.


    According to the guy using it, there is no dslr that will work/fit
    with this set-up. He said the camera he's using is the best camera
    for the rig.

    Don't argue with me on this. I don't know anything about the set-up.
    First time I've seen one, I have no particular interest in this area
    of photography, and I just passed along what I happened to see.

    He's linked up some of what he shot, but not all of it at:
    http://www.gigapan.org/viewGigapan.php?id=16752


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 10, 2009
    #3
  4. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:48:10 -0800, Savageduck <>
    wrote:

    >On 2009-02-09 19:52:49 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    >
    >> At the Mt Dora Art Festival this past weekend, a guy had this set-up
    >> to mechanically record some sort of panoramic view of the crowds
    >> (estimated attendance 250,000 to 300,00):
    >>
    >> http://tonycooper.fileave.com/camera.jpg
    >>
    >> He had it set up on the top of some steps to a building where it could
    >> shoot the crowds at the center of the festival. He said it would
    >> take 8 or 9 hours to download the images, but I forgot to ask how the
    >> images are stored.
    >>
    >> This isn't my type of thing, so it may be old hat to everyone else
    >> here. I'm posting it because I thought the gear-heads might be
    >> interested.

    >
    >Tony
    >
    >All very interesting, however from what I recall of Florida, Mt. Dora
    >seems to be something of a misnomer. I was always hardpressed to to
    >find any geo-formation which could be described as a hill or even a
    >"slight rise", let alone a "Mount" anywhere in Florida.
    >
    >I am probably wrong, but I always had this impression of a vast Florida
    >flatness.


    That's the way it is in Florida. Mount Dora was originally named
    Royellou, but the name was changed to Mount Dora in 1883. The town
    sits beside Lake Dora (after Dora Ann Drawdy, an early homesteader)
    and sits at 184 feet above sea level.

    Not impressed? Nearby Orlando is only 106 feet above sea level, and
    where I live (a suburb of Orlando) I'm at 75 feet above sea level.
    Try riding a bicycle from Orlando to the shuffleboard courts in
    downtown Mount Dora. The highest point in Florida is a mere 345 feet
    above sea level, and it's located almost on the Alabama border. No
    need for an oxygen mask, and eggs hard boil quickly in this state.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 11, 2009
    #4
  5. tony cooper

    Paul Furman Guest

    tony cooper wrote:
    > Savageduck wrote:
    >
    >> All very interesting, however from what I recall of Florida, Mt. Dora
    >> seems to be something of a misnomer. I was always hardpressed to to
    >> find any geo-formation which could be described as a hill or even a
    >> "slight rise", let alone a "Mount" anywhere in Florida.
    >>
    >> I am probably wrong, but I always had this impression of a vast Florida
    >> flatness.

    >
    > That's the way it is in Florida. Mount Dora was originally named
    > Royellou, but the name was changed to Mount Dora in 1883. The town
    > sits beside Lake Dora (after Dora Ann Drawdy, an early homesteader)
    > and sits at 184 feet above sea level.
    >
    > Not impressed? Nearby Orlando is only 106 feet above sea level, and
    > where I live (a suburb of Orlando) I'm at 75 feet above sea level.
    > Try riding a bicycle from Orlando to the shuffleboard courts in
    > downtown Mount Dora. The highest point in Florida is a mere 345 feet
    > above sea level, and it's located almost on the Alabama border. No
    > need for an oxygen mask, and eggs hard boil quickly in this state.


    The Edgehill Mountain in my email is a tiny 100-foot knob off a 600-foot
    'mountain' It's only a couple blocks wide though, so very steep.

    --
    Paul Furman
    www.edgehill.net
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 11, 2009
    #5
  6. tony cooper

    tony cooper Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 19:05:44 -0800, Savageduck <>
    wrote:

    >On 2009-02-10 18:28:21 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:48:10 -0800, Savageduck <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2009-02-09 19:52:49 -0800, tony cooper <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> At the Mt Dora Art Festival this past weekend, a guy had this set-up
    >>>> to mechanically record some sort of panoramic view of the crowds
    >>>> (estimated attendance 250,000 to 300,00):
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tonycooper.fileave.com/camera.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> He had it set up on the top of some steps to a building where it could
    >>>> shoot the crowds at the center of the festival. He said it would
    >>>> take 8 or 9 hours to download the images, but I forgot to ask how the
    >>>> images are stored.
    >>>>
    >>>> This isn't my type of thing, so it may be old hat to everyone else
    >>>> here. I'm posting it because I thought the gear-heads might be
    >>>> interested.
    >>>
    >>> Tony
    >>>
    >>> All very interesting, however from what I recall of Florida, Mt. Dora
    >>> seems to be something of a misnomer. I was always hardpressed to to
    >>> find any geo-formation which could be described as a hill or even a
    >>> "slight rise", let alone a "Mount" anywhere in Florida.
    >>>
    >>> I am probably wrong, but I always had this impression of a vast Florida
    >>> flatness.

    >>
    >> That's the way it is in Florida. Mount Dora was originally named
    >> Royellou, but the name was changed to Mount Dora in 1883. The town
    >> sits beside Lake Dora (after Dora Ann Drawdy, an early homesteader)
    >> and sits at 184 feet above sea level.
    >>
    >> Not impressed? Nearby Orlando is only 106 feet above sea level, and
    >> where I live (a suburb of Orlando) I'm at 75 feet above sea level.
    >> Try riding a bicycle from Orlando to the shuffleboard courts in
    >> downtown Mount Dora. The highest point in Florida is a mere 345 feet
    >> above sea level, and it's located almost on the Alabama border. No
    >> need for an oxygen mask, and eggs hard boil quickly in this state.

    >
    >I have a need for more dynamic elevation changes.
    >
    >Out here on the California Central Coast we have the sheer Big Sur
    >coast climbing from the Pacific to over 5000 ft in the Ventana
    >Wilderness. One of the most glorious roads less travelled is the
    >Nacimiento-Fergusson road from Fort Hunter-Liggett, over the Santa
    >Lucia Mountains with a precipitous drop of 3000 ft down to HWY 1.
    >
    >If you are ever in this area it is a "must drive" road. The usual
    >tourist route along HWY 1 between Morro Bay and Monterey is great,
    >this is a different take on this area.
    >http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/Nacimiento-Fergusson.pdf


    I don't know the road names/numbers, but on a business trip to San
    Francisco one year I finished up at Friday noon, rented a car, and
    drove down along the coast through Monterey and down to
    Carmel-By-The-Sea. I spent the rest of Friday, all of the weekend,
    and until late afternoon on Monday for the trip. I'd brought my wife
    on the trip.

    I've also driven from Denver south to Colorado Springs, west to Buena
    Vista, north through Leadville to Vail, and back to Denver. Just as
    the Aspen were turning, too. Went through some pass a few days before
    they closed it for the year.

    Also, I've been through the Smokies several times. Once drove a 197?
    (forget the year, now) VW Camper through the Smokies. No power to get
    up the hills, and not enough brakes coming down.

    I've been fortunate and have been able to travel quite a bit on
    business. Since I owned the company, I was able to take days off
    around business appointments and see a lot of the country.

    The most memorable mountain I've seen, I saw from the inside. There's
    a mountain in Austria where you go up the mountain on a funicular and
    lifts, but come down through a salt mine inside the mountain sliding
    on mats.
    http://www.salzwelten.at/cont/salzwelten/en_salzwelten_home.aspx



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
     
    tony cooper, Feb 11, 2009
    #6
  7. tony cooper

    Paul Furman Guest

    Savageduck wrote:
    > On 2009-02-10 18:28:21 -0800, tony cooper <>
    > said:
    >
    >> On Tue, 10 Feb 2009 17:48:10 -0800, Savageduck <>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2009-02-09 19:52:49 -0800, tony cooper
    >>> <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> At the Mt Dora Art Festival this past weekend, a guy had this set-up
    >>>> to mechanically record some sort of panoramic view of the crowds
    >>>> (estimated attendance 250,000 to 300,00):
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tonycooper.fileave.com/camera.jpg
    >>>>
    >>>> He had it set up on the top of some steps to a building where it could
    >>>> shoot the crowds at the center of the festival. He said it would
    >>>> take 8 or 9 hours to download the images, but I forgot to ask how the
    >>>> images are stored.
    >>>>
    >>>> This isn't my type of thing, so it may be old hat to everyone else
    >>>> here. I'm posting it because I thought the gear-heads might be
    >>>> interested.
    >>>
    >>> Tony
    >>>
    >>> All very interesting, however from what I recall of Florida, Mt. Dora
    >>> seems to be something of a misnomer. I was always hardpressed to to
    >>> find any geo-formation which could be described as a hill or even a
    >>> "slight rise", let alone a "Mount" anywhere in Florida.
    >>>
    >>> I am probably wrong, but I always had this impression of a vast Florida
    >>> flatness.

    >>
    >> That's the way it is in Florida. Mount Dora was originally named
    >> Royellou, but the name was changed to Mount Dora in 1883. The town
    >> sits beside Lake Dora (after Dora Ann Drawdy, an early homesteader)
    >> and sits at 184 feet above sea level.
    >>
    >> Not impressed? Nearby Orlando is only 106 feet above sea level, and
    >> where I live (a suburb of Orlando) I'm at 75 feet above sea level.
    >> Try riding a bicycle from Orlando to the shuffleboard courts in
    >> downtown Mount Dora. The highest point in Florida is a mere 345 feet
    >> above sea level, and it's located almost on the Alabama border. No
    >> need for an oxygen mask, and eggs hard boil quickly in this state.

    >
    > I have a need for more dynamic elevation changes.
    >
    > Out here on the California Central Coast we have the sheer Big Sur coast
    > climbing from the Pacific to over 5000 ft in the Ventana Wilderness. One
    > of the most glorious roads less travelled is the Nacimiento-Fergusson
    > road from Fort Hunter-Liggett, over the Santa Lucia Mountains with a
    > precipitous drop of 3000 ft down to HWY 1.
    >
    > If you are ever in this area it is a "must drive" road. The usual
    > tourist route along HWY 1 between Morro Bay and Monterey is great, this
    > is a different take on this area.
    > http://homepage.mac.com/lco/filechute/Nacimiento-Fergusson.pdf


    That's a dirt forest service road though, right? Cone Peak...
     
    Paul Furman, Feb 11, 2009
    #7
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