Giving up.

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Pablo, Nov 3, 2012.

  1. Pablo

    Pablo Guest

    I can't get composition right.

    I can't get exposure right.

    I can't get the choice of lens right.

    I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    any more.

    There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.

    Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    presentable?

    Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.


    --
    Pablo

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wibbleypants/
    The below is a link to an ad for an apartment
    for rent. It may or may not be of interest to photographers.
    Follow the link at your peril.
    http://paulc.es/piso/index.php
    Pablo, Nov 3, 2012
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Pablo

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 16:13:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:

    >I can't get composition right.
    >
    >I can't get exposure right.
    >
    >I can't get the choice of lens right.
    >
    >I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    >any more.
    >
    >There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.
    >
    >Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    >presentable?
    >
    >Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.


    I gotta laugh. I live on a golf course and played golf for years. I
    finally resigned my membership in the club and stopped playing golf
    because I got tired of paying all that money to publicly humiliate
    myself. I was never able to get better.

    Now, I'm an avid amateur photographer. Yes, I average just a few good
    shots out of a whole lot of clicks, but the big difference is that no
    one sees my bad ones.
    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 3, 2012
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Pablo

    philo Guest

    On 11/03/2012 10:13 AM, Pablo wrote:
    > I can't get composition right.
    >
    > I can't get exposure right.
    >
    > I can't get the choice of lens right.
    >
    > I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    > any more.
    >
    > There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.
    >
    > Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    > presentable?
    >
    > Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.
    >
    >



    I consider myself a pretty decent photographer.

    If I get one photo out of 500 that is good...I am happy

    Since you get only one good photo out of 1000 I suggest you
    really look at the whole frame before you snap the shutter.
    The mind tends to just see the main subject and ignore the rest.
    Before you snap, look to all four corners of the frame.

    I prefer photography to golf. The last time I golfed was 1967
    and I hit a parked car.

    --
    https://www.createspace.com/3707686
    philo, Nov 3, 2012
    #3
  4. (Pablo) wrote:

    > Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.


    Photography is the modern equivalent of hunting. Unless you're very good you have
    to chase a lot of deer in order to catch your next dinner.

    For me the chase is what's exciting. If every picture I took was superb I'd be...
    well, the most respected professional photographer in the world! But I'm definitely
    not. Far, far, far from it. :)

    When I stop getting excited when I load a card's contents onto my PC -- and then
    depressed when they nearly always turn out to be 'snaps' -- I'll know it's time to
    give up.

    Andrew McP

    PS Set yourself some challenges. If you use a DSLR just use your least popular lens
    for a month. If you use a camera with zoom, tape up the zoom control for a month.
    If you're out with your camera and spot something you want to shoot, ignore it,
    turn 180 degrees and find something there to photograph instead.

    Or just put the camera away for a month. In my experience nothing sharpens the
    photographic appetite more than knowing you can't take a photograph if you stumble
    across a great shot.

    PPS One of the problems with modern photography is that we can all, instantly via
    the internet, compare ourselves to every photographer on the planet. That can be
    very, very depressing. :) But we never see the billions (probably trillions!) of
    photographs which never make it onto Flikr or Picasa or whatever.
    Andrew MacPherson, Nov 3, 2012
    #4
  5. Pablo

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 16:43 +0000 (GMT Standard Time),
    (Andrew MacPherson) wrote:

    > (Pablo) wrote:
    >
    >> Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.

    >
    >Photography is the modern equivalent of hunting. Unless you're very good you have
    >to chase a lot of deer in order to catch your next dinner.
    >
    >For me the chase is what's exciting. If every picture I took was superb I'd be...
    >well, the most respected professional photographer in the world! But I'm definitely
    >not. Far, far, far from it. :)
    >
    >When I stop getting excited when I load a card's contents onto my PC -- and then
    >depressed when they nearly always turn out to be 'snaps' -- I'll know it's time to
    >give up.
    >
    >Andrew McP
    >
    >PS Set yourself some challenges. If you use a DSLR just use your least popular lens
    >for a month. If you use a camera with zoom, tape up the zoom control for a month.
    >If you're out with your camera and spot something you want to shoot, ignore it,
    >turn 180 degrees and find something there to photograph instead.
    >
    >Or just put the camera away for a month. In my experience nothing sharpens the
    >photographic appetite more than knowing you can't take a photograph if you stumble
    >across a great shot.
    >
    >PPS One of the problems with modern photography is that we can all, instantly via
    >the internet, compare ourselves to every photographer on the planet. That can be
    >very, very depressing. :) But we never see the billions (probably trillions!) of
    >photographs which never make it onto Flikr or Picasa or whatever.


    Some revile it, but the Shoot-In can help. That, and other on-line
    mandate driven competitions. A lot of the time we go out and look for
    photographs but don't see them. Chasing a mandate, though, encourages
    you to look for some aspect that you might not otherwise notice.

    In the case of the current Shoot-In, you might pass by something
    otherwise not interesting but suddenly see a "Curve" in it. I think
    it helps to have an objective when going out shooting, but one should
    also always take the shot that doesn't fit if it looks interesting.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 3, 2012
    #5
  6. Pablo

    Pablo Guest

    Andrew MacPherson escribió:

    > (Pablo) wrote:
    >
    >> Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.

    >
    > Photography is the modern equivalent of hunting. Unless you're very good
    > you have to chase a lot of deer in order to catch your next dinner.
    >
    > For me the chase is what's exciting. If every picture I took was superb
    > I'd be... well, the most respected professional photographer in the world!
    > But I'm definitely not. Far, far, far from it. :)
    >
    > When I stop getting excited when I load a card's contents onto my PC --
    > and then depressed when they nearly always turn out to be 'snaps' -- I'll
    > know it's time to give up.


    Ah. Worse - bodged snaps.

    I nearly cried when I saw that I'd chopped half a bug's head off. I was
    convinced that I'd got a great picture until I loaded the damned thing onto
    the PC.

    --
    Pablo

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/wibbleypants/
    The below is a link to an ad for an apartment
    for rent. It may or may not be of interest to photographers.
    Follow the link at your peril.
    http://paulc.es/piso/index.php
    Pablo, Nov 3, 2012
    #6
  7. Pablo

    nick c Guest

    On 11/3/2012 8:13 AM, Pablo wrote:

    > I can't get composition right.


    Remember the rule of Thirds. Most of the time it will work for you.

    >
    > I can't get exposure right.


    Exposure is simple, set the camera and let the camera determine
    exposure. Lighting (or the type there of) is what's extremely important.

    >
    > I can't get the choice of lens right.


    Just about 90% or 95% of your pictures could be taken with one good
    variable lens.

    >
    > I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    > any more.


    The secret to success is to do the best you can with the knowledge and
    tools that you have and let the future evolve as you gain in both
    knowledge and equipment.

    >
    > There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.


    When taking a picture look to tell a story. For example, a simple
    dramatic (B&W or color) picture of a wooden fence post, gate lock, door,
    shuttered window, train or train engine, doll house, etc... may tell a
    story in the mind of an observer.

    Envision the picture in your mind first before attempting to take the
    picture. A lone fence post with snipped barb wire located on the prairie
    could tell an imaginative story in the mind of an observer.

    Instead of randomly taking an occasional shot try adopting a theme and
    take pictures that compliment the theme. Take shots of bugs, if you like
    bugs; spider webs, old cars, abandoned factories, ships, beaches
    (including what one may find there), etc.. The most important thing to
    remember is to do what /you/ want to do and not be concerned with what
    others may think.

    >
    > Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    > presentable?


    There were times when I wished I was so lucky as to be in a position of
    opportunity and have one good shot that was technically correct as it
    told a story that imaginatively and emotionally moved an observer.

    Remember this, even when someone tells you your pictures are crap,
    consider yourself successful. A least the observer has been moved to
    display an emotion. Silence or indifference can be most intimidating.

    >
    > Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.


    Been there, done that. Golf never gave me the satisfaction of creativity
    that comes with a hobbyist's love of photography.

    Nick
    nick c, Nov 3, 2012
    #7
  8. Pablo

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 16:13:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:
    : I can't get composition right.
    :
    : I can't get exposure right.
    :
    : I can't get the choice of lens right.
    :
    : I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    : any more.
    :
    : There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.
    :
    : Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    : presentable?
    :
    : Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.

    Thinking you're not getting things right means little. Everyone feels that way
    to some degree.

    Compare your current work with what you were doing two years ago. If it's
    consistently better, you don't need to worry; you're headed in the right
    direction. If it isn't, you need to do a more rigorous job of examining what
    you're doing wrong and trying to improve.

    Golf is a silly game. It's expensive; it isn't very good exercise; and it
    produces nothing lasting to remind your successors that you were ever here.
    Photography is much better.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Nov 3, 2012
    #8
  9. Pablo

    Robert Coe Guest

    On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 19:10:55 +0100, Alfred Molon <>
    wrote:
    : In article <>, Andrew MacPherson
    : says...
    : > Photography is the modern equivalent of hunting.
    :
    : More like fishing - you never know what you will catch. Being in the
    : right place at the right time plays a big role.
    :
    : We went out for dinner and I wasn't planning to shoot anything. I just
    : brought the camera with the light 35mm lens on it, just in case. And I
    : ran into this sunshine:
    : http://www.molon.de/galleries/Germany/Dresden/Prager/img.php?pic=5

    Point made.

    Bob
    Robert Coe, Nov 3, 2012
    #9
  10. Pablo

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 17:15:21 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:

    >Golf is a silly game. It's expensive; it isn't very good exercise; and it
    >produces nothing lasting to remind your successors that you were ever here.
    >Photography is much better.


    Right. It's nothing like good glass or good camera bodies being
    expensive. It's not like you're tempted to buy PS, Topaz, Nic, and
    Lightroom. {chuckle}

    Yesterday I went out and used about $15 in gas and came home with one
    keeper.

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ignt52lo6jxnt0/2012-11-02-28.jpg
    Taken at a AIA "Pow Wow".

    Wonder what I could have done with it in Nic Silver Efex. I don't
    have any of the plug-ins.

    How about it, Duck, or anyone? Want the RAW version to try?

    https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ggnssa0kli2j2a/2012-11-02-28.dng

    There's a dust bunny on the sensor that has to be cloned out. Blew it
    out this morning.

    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 3, 2012
    #10
  11. Pablo

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 16:05:06 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2012-11-03 14:47:35 -0700, tony cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 17:15:21 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Golf is a silly game. It's expensive; it isn't very good exercise; and it
    >>> produces nothing lasting to remind your successors that you were ever here.
    >>> Photography is much better.

    >>
    >> Right. It's nothing like good glass or good camera bodies being
    >> expensive. It's not like you're tempted to buy PS, Topaz, Nic, and
    >> Lightroom. {chuckle}
    >>
    >> Yesterday I went out and used about $15 in gas and came home with one
    >> keeper.
    >>
    >> https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ignt52lo6jxnt0/2012-11-02-28.jpg
    >> Taken at a AIA "Pow Wow".
    >>
    >> Wonder what I could have done with it in Nic Silver Efex. I don't
    >> have any of the plug-ins.
    >>
    >> How about it, Duck, or anyone? Want the RAW version to try?
    >>
    >> https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ggnssa0kli2j2a/2012-11-02-28.dng
    >>
    >> There's a dust bunny on the sensor that has to be cloned out. Blew it
    >> out this morning.

    >
    >Nice capture!
    >Here is a Silver Efex Pro 2 version.
    >< http://db.tt/KV77UD6d >


    Is it my imagination or do I see a grainy look on the face to the
    Silver Efex version? I don't see much difference, though.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 4, 2012
    #11
  12. Pablo

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 17:44:36 -0700, Savageduck
    <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:

    >On 2012-11-03 17:05:36 -0700, tony cooper <> said:
    >
    >> On Sat, 3 Nov 2012 16:05:06 -0700, Savageduck
    >> <savageduck1@{REMOVESPAM}me.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> On 2012-11-03 14:47:35 -0700, tony cooper <> said:
    >>>
    >>>> On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 17:15:21 -0400, Robert Coe <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>> Golf is a silly game. It's expensive; it isn't very good exercise; and it
    >>>>> produces nothing lasting to remind your successors that you were ever here.
    >>>>> Photography is much better.
    >>>>
    >>>> Right. It's nothing like good glass or good camera bodies being
    >>>> expensive. It's not like you're tempted to buy PS, Topaz, Nic, and
    >>>> Lightroom. {chuckle}
    >>>>
    >>>> Yesterday I went out and used about $15 in gas and came home with one
    >>>> keeper.
    >>>>
    >>>> https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ignt52lo6jxnt0/2012-11-02-28.jpg
    >>>> Taken at a AIA "Pow Wow".
    >>>>
    >>>> Wonder what I could have done with it in Nic Silver Efex. I don't
    >>>> have any of the plug-ins.
    >>>>
    >>>> How about it, Duck, or anyone? Want the RAW version to try?
    >>>>
    >>>> https://www.dropbox.com/s/4ggnssa0kli2j2a/2012-11-02-28.dng
    >>>>
    >>>> There's a dust bunny on the sensor that has to be cloned out. Blew it
    >>>> out this morning.
    >>>
    >>> Nice capture!
    >>> Here is a Silver Efex Pro 2 version.
    >>> < http://db.tt/KV77UD6d >

    >>
    >> Is it my imagination or do I see a grainy look on the face to the
    >> Silver Efex version? I don't see much difference, though.

    >
    >I added some "structure" as NIK calls it.
    >...and it is just one possible version Silver Efex Pro is capable of.
    >As far as difference goes take a look at a side-by-side comparison of
    >the two.
    >< https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/screenshot_58.jpg >


    I get it now. The side-by-side makes it clearer. Your version
    lightens the skin, so it's showing some texture that my darker version
    doesn't reveal.

    The sepia would make a good postcard.


    BTW, I used a white border because this was going to a forum where the
    background is black. The white separates the image from the
    background. The DropBox images have a grayish background, so your
    black border works better. I'll have to come up with a double border
    like you do because I put images up on white, black, and gray
    backgrounds.


    >I could have just as easily come up with something like this.
    >< https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1295663/FileChute/2012-11-02-28-Ew.jpg >
    >
    >They are just different versions, the crop was pretty much expected by
    >both of us.


    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 4, 2012
    #12
  13. Pablo

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/3/2012 11:49 AM, tony cooper wrote:
    > On Sat, 03 Nov 2012 16:13:17 +0100, Pablo <> wrote:
    >
    >> I can't get composition right.
    >>
    >> I can't get exposure right.
    >>
    >> I can't get the choice of lens right.
    >>
    >> I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    >> any more.
    >>
    >> There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.
    >>
    >> Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    >> presentable?
    >>
    >> Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.

    >
    > I gotta laugh. I live on a golf course and played golf for years. I
    > finally resigned my membership in the club and stopped playing golf
    > because I got tired of paying all that money to publicly humiliate
    > myself. I was never able to get better.
    >
    > Now, I'm an avid amateur photographer. Yes, I average just a few good
    > shots out of a whole lot of clicks, but the big difference is that no
    > one sees my bad ones.
    >


    Golf gave me up, due to arthritis. I was never that good, but had
    moments of expectations. Thinking of the time I missed a hole in one at
    Pebble Beach by six inches. I have also birdied every hole at my club,
    but not in the same round.
    My batting average on images is not great, but most of the time the bad
    ones never see the light of day. Sometimes though, one slips through.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 4, 2012
    #13
  14. Pablo

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/3/2012 11:13 AM, Pablo wrote:
    > I can't get composition right.
    >
    > I can't get exposure right.
    >
    > I can't get the choice of lens right.
    >
    > I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    > any more.
    >
    > There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.
    >
    > Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    > presentable?
    >
    > Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.
    >
    >


    Get thee to some art museums, even if only on line. Look at the images
    and try to understand what they are good. Sounds like you need a critic,
    who is not afraid to give helpful comments.


    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 4, 2012
    #14
  15. Pablo

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/3/2012 1:28 PM, Pablo wrote:
    > Andrew MacPherson escribió:
    >
    >> (Pablo) wrote:
    >>
    >>> Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.

    >>
    >> Photography is the modern equivalent of hunting. Unless you're very good
    >> you have to chase a lot of deer in order to catch your next dinner.
    >>
    >> For me the chase is what's exciting. If every picture I took was superb
    >> I'd be... well, the most respected professional photographer in the world!
    >> But I'm definitely not. Far, far, far from it. :)
    >>
    >> When I stop getting excited when I load a card's contents onto my PC --
    >> and then depressed when they nearly always turn out to be 'snaps' -- I'll
    >> know it's time to give up.

    >
    > Ah. Worse - bodged snaps.
    >
    > I nearly cried when I saw that I'd chopped half a bug's head off. I was
    > convinced that I'd got a great picture until I loaded the damned thing onto
    > the PC.
    >

    Been there, done that. It happens to all of us. It's called learning.
    I don't know your financial situation, but attending a workshop is
    usually a good learning experience. You may also find them at a local
    college. The idea is not to get so down on yourself, that you become
    afraid to ask for help on your images.
    Of course, if you really don't enjoy it, take up fishing.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 4, 2012
    #15
  16. Pablo <> wrote:
    >I can't get composition right.
    >
    >I can't get exposure right.
    >
    >I can't get the choice of lens right.
    >
    >I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    >any more.
    >
    >There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.




    Working in a camera store/minilab and doing a lot of training of store
    staff taught me that most people with cameras take mostly atrocious
    images. Occasionally, they get lucky and their snapshot becomes a
    work of art which conveys a strong message, backed up with at least a
    hint of beauty - or ugliness, if that is your thing.

    Very few people have the natural talent to produce creative work that
    is also technically of a high standard. Slightly more people are
    creative but lack the technical ability.

    Unfortunately, the vast majority of owners of 'serious' cameras have a
    level of technical ability that exceeds their creative ability. You
    can probably teach these people even more technical ability, however,
    if the creativity is lacking, there is little that can be done to
    teach it.

    Online forums are full of people who have technical ability (or think
    they do) but are mostly devoid of creative talent. They obsess about
    the latest gear, the latest accessories and the latest software but
    all they can produce is thousands of mediocre snapshots and, if they
    are lucky, the occasional decent shot that they captured completely by
    accident. The Shoot-In [SI] is the perfect example of this.

    If you don't feel particularly creative but still want to capture
    reasonably good snapshots of your family, pets and places you visit,
    consider equipping yourself with a good quality point and shoot camera
    that has an 'intelligent Auto' mode. That type of camera does almost
    everything technical for you, leaving you to concentrate on selecting
    and composing your shots.
    Anthony Polson, Nov 4, 2012
    #16
  17. Pablo

    PeterN Guest

    On 11/3/2012 10:43 PM, Anthony Polson wrote:
    > Pablo <> wrote:
    >> I can't get composition right.
    >>
    >> I can't get exposure right.
    >>
    >> I can't get the choice of lens right.
    >>
    >> I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    >> any more.
    >>
    >> There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.

    >
    >
    >
    > Working in a camera store/minilab and doing a lot of training of store
    > staff taught me that most people with cameras take mostly atrocious
    > images. Occasionally, they get lucky and their snapshot becomes a
    > work of art which conveys a strong message, backed up with at least a
    > hint of beauty - or ugliness, if that is your thing.
    >
    > Very few people have the natural talent to produce creative work that
    > is also technically of a high standard. Slightly more people are
    > creative but lack the technical ability.
    >
    > Unfortunately, the vast majority of owners of 'serious' cameras have a
    > level of technical ability that exceeds their creative ability. You
    > can probably teach these people even more technical ability, however,
    > if the creativity is lacking, there is little that can be done to
    > teach it.
    >
    > Online forums are full of people who have technical ability (or think
    > they do) but are mostly devoid of creative talent. They obsess about
    > the latest gear, the latest accessories and the latest software but
    > all they can produce is thousands of mediocre snapshots and, if they
    > are lucky, the occasional decent shot that they captured completely by
    > accident. The Shoot-In [SI] is the perfect example of this.
    >
    > If you don't feel particularly creative but still want to capture
    > reasonably good snapshots of your family, pets and places you visit,
    > consider equipping yourself with a good quality point and shoot camera
    > that has an 'intelligent Auto' mode. That type of camera does almost
    > everything technical for you, leaving you to concentrate on selecting
    > and composing your shots.
    >


    Another statement assuming unproven facts. You may have good BSing
    ability, but have yet to prove yourself qualified to comment.
    It's easy to do without submitting images. Just take any two themes, and
    give helpful comments on EVERY image in that group. Tell us how they can
    be improved. Absent meaningful comments, your put down of the SI can
    only be taken as meaningless and bitter jealousy.

    --
    Peter
    PeterN, Nov 4, 2012
    #17
  18. Pablo

    tony cooper Guest

    On Sun, 04 Nov 2012 02:43:45 +0000, Anthony Polson
    <> wrote:

    >Working in a camera store/minilab and doing a lot of training of store
    >staff taught me that most people with cameras take mostly atrocious
    >images. Occasionally, they get lucky and their snapshot becomes a
    >work of art which conveys a strong message, backed up with at least a
    >hint of beauty - or ugliness, if that is your thing.


    I spent the better part of three decades in the specialty medical
    instrumentation field. First as a salesman, and then as the owner of
    company. I employed and trained salesmen.

    The company distributed hand-held surgical instruments, surgical
    microscopes, medical lasers, and many other products. If you feel
    that spending years selling products, and training staff on those
    products, qualifies one to use those products or judge the ability of
    those who do, then I assume that you would allow me to perform surgery
    on you.

    I'd offer to do a lobotomy on you for starters, but it seems someone
    has already done that.



    --
    Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
    tony cooper, Nov 4, 2012
    #18
  19. Pablo

    DanP Guest

    On Saturday, November 3, 2012 3:13:19 PM UTC, Pablo wrote:
    > I can't get composition right.
    >
    >
    >
    > I can't get exposure right.
    >
    >
    >
    > I can't get the choice of lens right.


    If you can tell why is not right then there is hope. If you thought craps shots were great then you would be right in giving up.

    >
    > I feel I've tried so hard, but I'm seriously thinking of just not bothering
    >
    > any more.
    >
    >
    >
    > There must be something that a photographer needs that I just haven't got.
    >


    Yeah, years of experience. Got to work for it. Not saying that I have that but I am getting better at it and feel embarrassed looking at old shots I used to like.

    >
    > Or is it the same for everyone ie; one photo out of a thousand is tolerably
    >
    > presentable?
    >


    Slow down, look at the scene and think what a good shot should look like.
    Light direction, depth of field, background, focal length. Luck plays a part for sure.

    Sometimes a scene simply is not worth bothering.

    >
    > Perhaps I'll take up golf instead.
    >


    If you are good at golf, fine. If not what will follow next? Fishing?


    DanP
    DanP, Nov 4, 2012
    #19
  20. Pablo

    DanP Guest

    On Sunday, November 4, 2012 2:43:02 AM UTC, Anthony Polson wrote:

    > Working in a camera store/minilab and doing a lot of training of store
    >
    > staff taught me that most people with cameras take mostly atrocious
    >
    > images. Occasionally, they get lucky and their snapshot becomes a
    >
    > work of art which conveys a strong message, backed up with at least a
    >
    > hint of beauty - or ugliness, if that is your thing.
    >
    >
    >
    > Very few people have the natural talent to produce creative work that
    >
    > is also technically of a high standard. Slightly more people are
    >
    > creative but lack the technical ability.


    Have you ever turned away a customer because lack of artistic talent? Now be a good boy and keep quiet.


    DanP
    DanP, Nov 4, 2012
    #20
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