gitzo tripod head 3/8" or 1/4"?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Chris Loffredo, Sep 10, 2006.

  1. bugbear wrote:
    > Dear all;
    >
    > I recently lucked into a small Gitzo tripod
    > at a car boot sale.
    >
    > It was cheap enough that I took a risk...
    >
    > The head plate has multiple drillings that
    > are all tapped for 3/8".
    >
    > The camera fixing bolt is mainly 3/8", with a short
    > section of 1/4" at one end.
    >
    > I believe 3/8" is the size of fixing used for larger
    > cameras, even though the tripod is quite small.
    >
    > Here are a coupla' photos.
    >
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg
    >
    > Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    > onto this head? Do I need an adapter of some kind?
    >
    > And (secondarily) can anyone ID the tripod as a whole?
    >


    It looks like the classic "Reporter" model: I have two of them (in
    separate locations).

    You use the screw for different sizes simply by turning it over.

    I had the same head and, while not at all bad, I prefer more modern
    Manfrotto heads to it - especially since they have quick release plates
    and the old cork on your head may have hardened, making a firm
    attachment difficult.
    I like the Manfrotto 460 MG as a 3D head; light but can hold a Kiev 60 +
    300mm or a Rolliflex SL 3003 + 400mm quite solidly (and costs lots less
    than Arca Swiss).

    I'm 100% satisfied with the legs themselves (excepting dreams of carbon,
    etc.)

    => Correction, my "Reporter" only has 3 (longer) leg elements, not 4; so
    yours must be the model just under that.
    Current Gitzo models:
    http://www.gitzo.com/products/metric/tripods/45classic/rightscreen.php3
    Chris Loffredo, Sep 10, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. bugbear wrote:
    > Chris Loffredo wrote:
    >> It looks like the classic "Reporter" model: I have two of them (in
    >> separate locations).

    >
    > Excellent. I have a name to google with.
    >
    >>
    >> You use the screw for different sizes simply by turning it over.

    >
    > But the bolt is threaded (and hence "captive") in the plate.
    >
    > If it just passed though a hole in the plate, I would
    > understand.
    >
    > My thoughts on a "fix" involves simply drilling
    > out the hole, so the 3/8 bolt simply clears
    > (so the 3/8 bolt has fere travel through the plate)
    >
    > I could then fix the 1/4" end into my camera, and pull
    > the camera down on to the plate using the large plastic
    > nut.
    >
    > But I just keep thinking I shouldn't have to...
    >
    > BTW, the camera that will go on this (in the short
    > term) is a tiny light Canon A60, but I also
    > use a Canon A510.
    >
    > Both digital compacts :)
    >


    Oh, well, than *any* head will do... ;-)

    More seriously, the screw probably isn't the original. If you have an
    old camera shop nearby, try finding a 1/4' screw & blocking ring - I
    think that' still better than damaging what is practically a collector's
    item (whatever you paid). Also, one of the weak spots of that head is
    that you can really get a good grip on the tightening screw, so an
    alternative could be nice.
    Chris Loffredo, Sep 10, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Nicholas O. Lindan wrote:
    >>
    >> Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    >> [the plate is threaded for a 3/8" bolt?]

    >
    > Well, the first thing is to throw whole head thing into the dustbin and get
    > the head and quick release plate _I_ use, I wouldn't use anything
    > other than the best so you can take my recommendation as gospel.
    > I recommend the PermaJam head and the SlipsOff QR plate. Last
    > week I recommended the BalloWax head and the ThreadStrppr plate but
    > that was before e set me straight and I now do what
    > he tells me to do and so should you.


    ROTFL!!

    Seriously, I think that Bilbo J. Baggins III Esq. of Hobbiton (Gasp!
    Really!) undoubtedly wanted to give good advice and not *communicate*
    what he considers to be worthy of his use...

    For myself, I think I'll start adding my academic degrees, titles & more
    prestigious locations to my signatures.
    ;-)

    > I think you have a non-standard bolt for the head.
    >
    > http://www.saeki.co.kr/shop/shop_01_product_content.asp?code=UE0010016
    >
    > is what the Gitzo bolt looks like.


    I concur (the two such heads I have presently being in galaxys far, far
    away...

    My complaints about that head are:

    1) The small size of the bolt head above (not the gray tightening ring,
    which is original), which makes it difficult to sufficiently tighten
    cameras (even of the weight of digital P&Ss) added to

    2) The hardening/smoothening of the cork interface, which make a secure
    camera fastening *somewhat unreliable*..

    For these reasons I've relegated both heads to secondary uses (copy
    stand & flash support) and replaced them with other heads. YMMV...

    Just experiment: If you find the camera(s) are flapping around loosely,
    then you need a new head, otherwise - enjoy!
    Chris Loffredo, Sep 10, 2006
    #3
  4. Paul Furman wrote:

    > BTW it is handy enough but the leg tighteners get jammed and the head is
    > not strong enough for a long heavy lens. I use it for holding the
    > projector now, with a wood plank bolted on as a platform.


    ?????

    While I agree in that I don't especially like that head, I've never,
    ever had the legs "jam" on me (2 'pods over nearly 2 decades).
    I do take the legs apart & clean them every half-decade or so.
    Admittedly, I haven't used them underwater, buried in sand or stuck in
    molten lava...

    The classic Gitzos are a bit like the Nikon F/F2 of the tripod world -
    basically indestructable - though there was a nutter in this NG who
    maintained that the F2 was the most unreliable camera ever made!
    Chris Loffredo, Sep 10, 2006
    #4
  5. Paul Furman wrote:
    > Chris Loffredo wrote:
    >
    >> Paul Furman wrote:
    >>
    >>> BTW it is handy enough but the leg tighteners get jammed and the head
    >>> is not strong enough for a long heavy lens. I use it for holding the
    >>> projector now, with a wood plank bolted on as a platform.

    >>
    >> ?????
    >>
    >> While I agree in that I don't especially like that head, I've never,
    >> ever had the legs "jam" on me (2 'pods over nearly 2 decades).
    >> I do take the legs apart & clean them every half-decade or so.

    >
    > I can't collapse them. Like there's air pressure almost. I opened up &
    > cleaned the leather/carboard? slip things making sure the slot wasn't
    > clogged to no avail. It was like this when I got it at the garage sale.
    >


    I just opened mine: The "slips" or gaskets are brownish but are
    definitely synthetic.

    If I hold my 'pod upside-down and loosen the rings, the legs easily &
    smoothly collapse from their own weight.

    Something isn't working properly...
    Chris Loffredo, Sep 11, 2006
    #5
  6. Chris Loffredo

    bugbear Guest

    Dear all;

    I recently lucked into a small Gitzo tripod
    at a car boot sale.

    It was cheap enough that I took a risk...

    The head plate has multiple drillings that
    are all tapped for 3/8".

    The camera fixing bolt is mainly 3/8", with a short
    section of 1/4" at one end.

    I believe 3/8" is the size of fixing used for larger
    cameras, even though the tripod is quite small.

    Here are a coupla' photos.

    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg

    Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    onto this head? Do I need an adapter of some kind?

    And (secondarily) can anyone ID the tripod as a whole?

    BugBear
    bugbear, Sep 11, 2006
    #6
  7. "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg
    >
    > Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    > onto this head? Do I need an adapter of some kind?


    Get an Arca Swiss clamp and plate system, either from Really Right Stuff or
    Kirk Enterprises. They'll have "plates" that go on your camera, and clamps
    that go on the head. (Get a clamp with the larger screw size, Doh!)

    Clamps:
    http://www.kirkphoto.com/platforms.html

    Plates (click your camera mfr):
    http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/body_plates/index.html

    I've purchased stuff from both Kirk and RRS, and it's all really good stuff.

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Sep 11, 2006
    #7
  8. Chris Loffredo

    bugbear Guest

    David J. Littleboy wrote:
    > "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >
    >>http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    >>http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg
    >>
    >>Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    >>onto this head? Do I need an adapter of some kind?

    >
    >
    > Get an Arca Swiss clamp and plate system, either from Really Right Stuff or
    > Kirk Enterprises. They'll have "plates" that go on your camera, and clamps
    > that go on the head. (Get a clamp with the larger screw size, Doh!)
    >
    > Clamps:
    > http://www.kirkphoto.com/platforms.html
    >
    > Plates (click your camera mfr):
    > http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/body_plates/index.html


    OK; that'd work.

    Thanks for the pointer. What a lot of money :)

    Assuming I don't want an auxilliary Q/R system,
    my questions remains - is this tripod/head
    directly usable (and how...) with a camera
    with a 1/4" mount?

    And cheaply ?

    The tripod cost me 3.00 pounds sterling...

    BugBear
    bugbear, Sep 11, 2006
    #8
  9. "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    > David J. Littleboy wrote:
    >> "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >>
    >>>http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    >>>http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg
    >>>
    >>>Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    >>>onto this head? Do I need an adapter of some kind?

    >>
    >>
    >> Get an Arca Swiss clamp and plate system, either from Really Right Stuff
    >> or
    >> Kirk Enterprises. They'll have "plates" that go on your camera, and
    >> clamps
    >> that go on the head. (Get a clamp with the larger screw size, Doh!)
    >>
    >> Clamps:
    >> http://www.kirkphoto.com/platforms.html
    >>
    >> Plates (click your camera mfr):
    >> http://www.reallyrightstuff.com/body_plates/index.html

    >
    > OK; that'd work.
    >
    > Thanks for the pointer. What a lot of money :)


    I thought you'd say that. But then you'd have a Q/R system that you could
    use on any tripod.

    > Assuming I don't want an auxilliary Q/R system,
    > my questions remains - is this tripod/head
    > directly usable (and how...) with a camera
    > with a 1/4" mount?


    Since 3/8 is larger than 1/4, you're stuck; you basically need both parts of
    a quick release system.

    The only alternative would be if one of those quick-release system camera
    plates happened to have a 3/8" threaded hole in the bottom of it. The Really
    Right Stuff _generic_ L bracket (that works on things like the Nikon FM2 and
    Mamiya 7) has a 1/4" hole. Oops. No cigar.

    Both Kirk and RRS can be quite helpful, and would be willing to sell you a
    camera plate with 3/8 threads if they had one, if you called them or emailed
    and asked. (I think they owe me a commission<g>.)

    (Also, check B&H or the like for cheaper Q/R systems.)

    David J. Littleboy
    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Sep 11, 2006
    #9
  10. "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >
    > The head plate has multiple drillings that
    > are all tapped for 3/8".
    >
    > The camera fixing bolt is mainly 3/8", with a short
    > section of 1/4" at one end.


    Dumb question: What happens when you put the bolt through the head with the
    1/4" end sticking up?

    Another dumb idea: chuck the head (it looks as though it's nicely made (the
    markings on the base are really pretty) but it's probably pretty poor as a
    head) and buy the smallest RRS head. I have one, and it's quite nice. You'll
    need a plate (since it comes with a Q/R clamp) for each of your cameras,
    though.

    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg



    --
    David J. Littleboy

    Tokyo, Japan
    David J. Littleboy, Sep 11, 2006
    #10
  11. Chris Loffredo

    dadiOH Guest

    bugbear wrote:

    > Assuming I don't want an auxilliary Q/R system,
    > my questions remains - is this tripod/head
    > directly usable (and how...) with a camera
    > with a 1/4" mount?


    Of course it's usable...put the stud through the head with the 1/4"
    portion up, extend it appropriately, screw on the camera and lock it
    in that position with the knurled plastic knob on the stud below the
    head.


    --

    dadiOH
    ____________________________

    dadiOH's dandies v3.06...
    ....a help file of info about MP3s, recording from
    LP/cassette and tips & tricks on this and that.
    Get it at http://mysite.verizon.net/xico
    dadiOH, Sep 11, 2006
    #11
  12. Chris Loffredo

    bugbear Guest

    dadiOH wrote:
    > bugbear wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Assuming I don't want an auxilliary Q/R system,
    >>my questions remains - is this tripod/head
    >>directly usable (and how...) with a camera
    >>with a 1/4" mount?

    >
    >
    > Of course it's usable...put the stud through the head with the 1/4"
    > portion up, extend it appropriately, screw on the camera and lock it
    > in that position with the knurled plastic knob on the stud below the
    > head.


    Doesn't work - the bolt is threaded-and-screwed through the
    plate. So as I rotate the bolt to turn the 1/4" portion
    of the the thread into the camera, the bolt will
    be extending itself from the plate,
    so the camera to plate distance stays roughly
    constant - the camera isn't pulled down onto the
    plate.

    BugBear
    bugbear, Sep 11, 2006
    #12
  13. Chris Loffredo

    bugbear Guest

    David J. Littleboy wrote:
    > "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:
    >
    >>The head plate has multiple drillings that
    >>are all tapped for 3/8".
    >>
    >>The camera fixing bolt is mainly 3/8", with a short
    >>section of 1/4" at one end.

    >
    >
    > Dumb question: What happens when you put the bolt through the head with the
    > 1/4" end sticking up?


    I can't turn the bolt to secure the camera,
    since the 3/8" thread in the plate means
    the bolt moves upwards w.r.t. plate
    more or less as fast as the 1/4" thread moves
    into the camera.

    > Another dumb idea: chuck the head (it looks as though it's nicely made (the
    > markings on the base are really pretty) but it's probably pretty poor as a
    > head)


    It appears that it's an earlier version of a 158 dollar head:

    http://www.badgergraphic.com/store/cart.php?m=product_detail&p=1736

    > and buy the smallest RRS head. I have one, and it's quite nice. You'll
    > need a plate (since it comes with a Q/R clamp) for each of your cameras,
    > though.


    BugBear
    bugbear, Sep 11, 2006
    #13
  14. Chris Loffredo

    bugbear Guest

    Chris Loffredo wrote:
    > It looks like the classic "Reporter" model: I have two of them (in
    > separate locations).


    Excellent. I have a name to google with.

    >
    > You use the screw for different sizes simply by turning it over.


    But the bolt is threaded (and hence "captive") in the plate.

    If it just passed though a hole in the plate, I would
    understand.

    My thoughts on a "fix" involves simply drilling
    out the hole, so the 3/8 bolt simply clears
    (so the 3/8 bolt has fere travel through the plate)

    I could then fix the 1/4" end into my camera, and pull
    the camera down on to the plate using the large plastic
    nut.

    But I just keep thinking I shouldn't have to...

    BTW, the camera that will go on this (in the short
    term) is a tiny light Canon A60, but I also
    use a Canon A510.

    Both digital compacts :)

    BugBear
    bugbear, Sep 11, 2006
    #14
  15. Chris Loffredo

    Pat Guest

    You have two options. They are not real great, but they're basically
    free -- so you can't beat that.

    1. You could drill out the threads so you just slide the rod through
    the hole and thread into the camera. Then tighten with the know.

    2. Put the camera on the heat slightly ajar and hold it into position.
    Thread the rod through the mount and into the camera. Then when
    you've got the threads into the camera, tighten down with the know.
    Then rotate the camera to do the final tightening. There are two
    issues here. First, it'll take a little playing with to get it tight
    enough and still straight. Second. make sure you don't over do it and
    drive the rod into the camera.

    I suppose you could also grind the threads off the rod. But that
    doesn't sound to exciting.

    Finally, you could always hold the camera in place with duct tape ;-))

    Good luck with it.

    bugbear wrote:
    > Dear all;
    >
    > I recently lucked into a small Gitzo tripod
    > at a car boot sale.
    >
    > It was cheap enough that I took a risk...
    >
    > The head plate has multiple drillings that
    > are all tapped for 3/8".
    >
    > The camera fixing bolt is mainly 3/8", with a short
    > section of 1/4" at one end.
    >
    > I believe 3/8" is the size of fixing used for larger
    > cameras, even though the tripod is quite small.
    >
    > Here are a coupla' photos.
    >
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg
    >
    > Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    > onto this head? Do I need an adapter of some kind?
    >
    > And (secondarily) can anyone ID the tripod as a whole?
    >
    > BugBear
    Pat, Sep 11, 2006
    #15
  16. On Mon, 11 Sep 2006 14:19:58 +0100, bugbear
    <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote:

    >
    >I can't turn the bolt to secure the camera,
    >since the 3/8" thread in the plate means
    >the bolt moves upwards w.r.t. plate
    >more or less as fast as the 1/4" thread moves
    >into the camera.
    >


    I would screw the bolt into the plate until just the 1/4" piece is
    sticking up. Then lock it with the knob from below. Then screw the
    camera onto the bolt until snug, adjusting the amount of the bolt that
    is sticking up as necessary by loosening the knob slightly.

    I was also terrible at 3-D mechanical drawing.

    Cheers,
    DuncanC
    Duncan Chesley, Sep 11, 2006
    #16
  17. "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote

    > Here are a coupla' photos.
    >
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_main.jpg
    > http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f234/bugbear33/gitzo/gitzo_head.jpg
    >
    > Can anyone tell me how I fix a "normal" camera with a 1/4" socket
    > [the plate is threaded for a 3/8" bolt?]


    Well, the first thing is to throw whole head thing into the dustbin and get
    the head and quick release plate _I_ use, I wouldn't use anything
    other than the best so you can take my recommendation as gospel.
    I recommend the PermaJam head and the SlipsOff QR plate. Last
    week I recommended the BalloWax head and the ThreadStrppr plate but
    that was before e set me straight and I now do what
    he tells me to do and so should you.

    ObSmileyOff

    I think you have a non-standard bolt for the head.

    http://www.saeki.co.kr/shop/shop_01_product_content.asp?code=UE0010016

    is what the Gitzo bolt looks like. The threads in the plate only go
    part way [or should] and the end set of 3/8 threads are threaded
    past the plate threads. The bolt is then free with the smooth
    unthreaded portion of the bolt going through the plate. The knob
    is threaded to the bolt at the knurled head-end of the bolt.

    The bolt is screwed into the camera and then the plastic knob
    is turned to pull the bolt down into the head to clamp the camera
    in place.

    Gitzo sells replacement bolts/knobs/assemblies. For the mean-time
    try a long-ish 1/4-20 bolt from the ironmonger.

    I would wager you are number NNN in a long line of folks who have
    bought that tripod, scratched their head mightily and sold it off.

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
    Darkroom Automation
    http://www.nolindan.com/da/index.htm
    n o lindan at ix dot netcom dot com
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Sep 11, 2006
    #17
  18. Chris Loffredo

    bugbear Guest

    Nicholas O. Lindan wrote:
    >
    > Well, the first thing is to throw whole head thing into the dustbin and get
    > the head and quick release plate _I_ use, I wouldn't use anything
    > other than the best so you can take my recommendation as gospel.
    > I recommend the PermaJam head and the SlipsOff QR plate. Last
    > week I recommended the BalloWax head and the ThreadStrppr plate but
    > that was before e set me straight and I now do what
    > he tells me to do and so should you.
    >
    > ObSmileyOff


    (nice!)


    > I think you have a non-standard bolt for the head.


    (a friend looking over my shoulder has also
    pointed out that while the head locking knobs are black
    plastic, the plate locking knob is gray - perhaps
    another non-original part?)

    > http://www.saeki.co.kr/shop/shop_01_product_content.asp?code=UE0010016
    >
    > is what the Gitzo bolt looks like. The threads in the plate only go
    > part way [or should] and the end set of 3/8 threads are threaded
    > past the plate threads. The bolt is then free with the smooth
    > unthreaded portion of the bolt going through the plate. The knob
    > is threaded to the bolt at the knurled head-end of the bolt.
    >
    > The bolt is screwed into the camera and then the plastic knob
    > is turned to pull the bolt down into the head to clamp the camera
    > in place.
    >
    > Gitzo sells replacement bolts/knobs/assemblies. For the mean-time
    > try a long-ish 1/4-20 bolt from the ironmonger.
    >
    > I would wager you are number NNN in a long line of folks who have
    > bought that tripod, scratched their head mightily and sold it off.


    That is excellent information. I suspect I can make such a bolt,
    and it clearly solves the problem.

    I don't think it's the whole answer to the question though,
    since it doesn't explain why the plate is threaded.

    Perhaps it's multi-functional?

    But - yes - I think you've cracked it!

    BugBear
    bugbear, Sep 11, 2006
    #18
  19. "bugbear" <bugbear@trim_papermule.co.uk_trim> wrote in message
    news:450560cf$0$3589$...
    > dadiOH wrote:
    >> bugbear wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Assuming I don't want an auxilliary Q/R system,
    >>>my questions remains - is this tripod/head
    >>>directly usable (and how...) with a camera
    >>>with a 1/4" mount?

    >>
    >> Of course it's usable...put the stud through the head with the 1/4"
    >> portion up, extend it appropriately, screw on the camera and lock it
    >> in that position with the knurled plastic knob on the stud below the
    >> head.

    >
    > Doesn't work - the bolt is threaded-and-screwed through the
    > plate. So as I rotate the bolt to turn the 1/4" portion
    > of the the thread into the camera, the bolt will
    > be extending itself from the plate,
    > so the camera to plate distance stays roughly
    > constant - the camera isn't pulled down onto the
    > plate.


    OK. First point - it is the tripod head with which you have difficulty, not
    the tripod itself. (The tripod also has the threaded 3/8" bolt with a 1/4"
    thread on one end.) Correct?

    Second point - DadiOH has the right solution. Your image of the head shows
    three items: the head, the stud, and a "wheel" with a threaded (3/8", isn't
    it?) hole in the center. Screw the stud, 1/4" portion up, into the tripod
    head "appropriately"...one way is to measure the depth of the tripod
    receptacles of both cameras and use the shorter depth of the two. Then
    screw in this "wheel" from *under* the tripod head until it snugly fits
    against the underside of that tripod head. You will find that the stud is
    held fast and will not move. Then rotate your camera snugly onto the 1/4"
    portion of the stud. If the camera does rotate under pressure (stud is not
    held fast and does move), then tighten the "wheel" down more.

    The point is that you don't thread the stud into the camera independent of
    the tripod. You make the stud fast to the tripod such that you thread the
    tripod into the camera...or thread the camera onto the tripod.
    Lawrence Akutagawa, Sep 11, 2006
    #19
  20. > I don't think it's the whole answer to the question though,
    > since it doesn't explain why the plate is threaded.


    The plate is threaded to hold the bolt captive. If the
    hole in the plate was a through hole the bolt would fall
    out. The top section of threads is threaded through the
    plate and then the bolt is loose to slide up and down.

    Other tripods place a 'C' ring around the top of the bolt
    after it has been placed into the plate. However, this
    keeps you from easily changing the bolt from 1/4 to 3/8.
    With the Gitzo you just unscrew one and screw in the other.
    The bolts used on the columns are reversible - that may
    be what you have: a ground down center-post bolt.

    --
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Cleveland, Ohio
    Darkroom Automation
    Nicholas O. Lindan, Sep 11, 2006
    #20
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