Gitzo G1327 - can it get low down to ground level for Macro work?

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by DeanB, Mar 17, 2007.

  1. DeanB

    DeanB Guest

    I want to get a good tripod that can also be used for marco work close
    to the ground. Is the Gitzo 1327 up to this? It doesn't say on the
    site although it does mention something about the legs opening 80
    degrees each, which might do the trick.

    Thanks for any advice.

    Dean
     
    DeanB, Mar 17, 2007
    #1
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  2. DeanB

    Nervous Nick Guest

    On Mar 17, 11:31 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:
    > I want to get a good tripod that can also be used for marco work close
    > to the ground. Is the Gitzo 1327 up to this? It doesn't say on the
    > site although it does mention something about the legs opening 80
    > degrees each, which might do the trick.
    >
    > Thanks for any advice.
    >
    > Dean


    Why would you want to pay so much money for a tripod? It just boggles
    me.

    Anyway, for what it is worth, I have had only a couple of tripods in
    my life--from the same manufacturer.

    I used the Slik U112 for years while I was traveling. You can reverse
    the mount so the camera attaches upside-down, under the tripod legs.
    I know that many other manufacturers' might feature this too, and it
    sounds like what you need to ask about:

    Is the center post threaded at each end?

    HTH.

    --
    YOP...
     
    Nervous Nick, Mar 17, 2007
    #2
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  3. DeanB

    JD Guest

    DeanB wrote:

    > I want to get a good tripod that can also be used for marco work close
    > to the ground. Is the Gitzo 1327 up to this? It doesn't say on the
    > site although it does mention something about the legs opening 80
    > degrees each, which might do the trick.
    >
    > Thanks for any advice.
    >
    > Dean
    >

    According to B&H, miminum height is 17.3 inches for the Gitzo.
    The Bogen 055MF3 has a minimum height of 4.3 inches according to B&H.

    I've got the Bogen 3021 Pro. I believe the 055MF3 is the carbon fiber
    version of the 3021 Pro. It does go to that very low height. But
    remember, that does NOT include the additional height of the head. I
    don't know if the 055M3 was available when I got the 3021 or if it was a
    matter of me not wanting to spend the money. If I were to do it again,
    I'd go carbon for the weight reduction but mainly for vibration
    reduction. Also note that the 055MF3 and the 3021 Pro allow you to pull
    the center column out and put in horizontal postion. I have found that
    very useful in the very low heights which was why I got the 3021 Pro.

    The ability of getting that close to the ground is achieved by having
    the center post in two sections. The top section inserts into the
    "spider" portion of the tripod and does not extend any further down than
    the section where the legs attach. That's what allows you to get down
    to 4.3 inches. If the center portion is not taken apart (and it
    unscrews with too fine of a thread, take a while), the minimum height is
    about 18 inches. So the adjustment of the height between 18 inches and
    4.3 inches is done by leg placement only. Be aware of that limitation.

    I use a Bogen 410 geared head for the macro work.

    I've done the trick of having the mounting the camera on the bottom of
    the center post. The camera is upside down, the controls are not where
    you expect them to be and the legs will be in the way while you stick
    your head between them to compose. Forget it, get a tripod that can go
    low.

    JD
     
    JD, Mar 18, 2007
    #3
  4. Nervous Nick wrote:

    > On Mar 17, 11:31 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:
    >
    >>I want to get a good tripod that can also be used for marco work close
    >>to the ground. Is the Gitzo 1327 up to this? It doesn't say on the
    >>site although it does mention something about the legs opening 80
    >>degrees each, which might do the trick.
    >>
    >>Thanks for any advice.
    >>
    >>Dean

    >
    > Why would you want to pay so much money for a tripod? It just boggles
    > me.


    It's not the money. For me its the stability and vibration reduction.
    The weight saving is nice too. In some applications, an aluminum
    tripod would have to be many times heavier for the same stability
    and vibration reduction. I have bogen, slick, velbon, aluminum
    and wooden tripods, and nothing compares to carbon fiber for stability,
    vibration reduction, and low weight.

    I have the Gitzo 1228, which the specs say goes an inch lower than the
    1227. The center column on my 1228 is reversible so you can mount
    the camera upside down and get right down on the ground.
    The legs do open very wide; 80 degrees sounds about right.
    B&H says the 1227 and 1228 are now discontinued.

    I don't know what would be equivalent.

    I have a 1228, ans a 1348, and am looking for something smaller
    for lighter travel. I would like beefy legs like the 1228
    but shorter legs so more compact. Gitzo doesn't have a model
    that I can find. Any other possibilities?

    Roger
     
    Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark), Mar 20, 2007
    #4
  5. DeanB

    Nervous Nick Guest

    On Mar 19, 9:04 pm, "Roger N. Clark (change username to rnclark)"
    <> wrote:
    > Nervous Nickwrote:
    > > On Mar 17, 11:31 am, "DeanB" <> wrote:

    >
    > >>I want to get a good tripod that can also be used for marco work close
    > >>to the ground. Is the Gitzo 1327 up to this? It doesn't say on the
    > >>site although it does mention something about the legs opening 80
    > >>degrees each, which might do the trick.

    >
    > >>Thanks for any advice.

    >
    > >>Dean

    >
    > > Why would you want to pay so much money for a tripod? It just boggles
    > > me.

    >
    > It's not the money. For me its the stability and vibration reduction.
    > The weight saving is nice too. In some applications, an aluminum
    > tripod would have to be many times heavier for the same stability
    > and vibration reduction. I have bogen, slick, velbon, aluminum
    > and wooden tripods, and nothing compares to carbon fiber for stability,
    > vibration reduction, and low weight.
    >
    > I have the Gitzo 1228, which the specs say goes an inch lower than the
    > 1227. The center column on my 1228 is reversible so you can mount
    > the camera upside down and get right down on the ground.
    > The legs do open very wide; 80 degrees sounds about right.
    > B&H says the 1227 and 1228 are now discontinued.
    >
    > I don't know what would be equivalent.
    >
    > I have a 1228, ans a 1348, and am looking for something smaller
    > for lighter travel. I would like beefy legs like the 1228
    > but shorter legs so more compact. Gitzo doesn't have a model
    > that I can find. Any other possibilities?
    >
    > Roger


    When I was traveling on spec as a freelancer (for about three months
    at a time, with three SLR bodies (T-90s, oh what nice cameras!)) and
    all kinds of assorted lenses and accessories, maybe thirty pounds of
    gear, I did a lot of night shooting. I dunno if I thought of this on
    my own, but for the night shots I started taking the U112 (maybe it
    was a 212, it's been a long time since all that gear got burglarized
    from my apartment) and hanging my (full) camera bag from it so that it
    just touched the ground on one edge to keep it from swinging. I
    figured if I had all that stuff with me anyway, I might as well put it
    to some use, and this was effectively adding twenty or so pounds to
    the weight of the tripod. Between that and locking up the mirror,
    closing the viewfinder shutter, and even using a dark shade to hold in
    front of the lens while the shutter opens, I got excellent results
    indeed for very long bulb exposures. If it was not a *really* windy
    day I don't think I could have had a more stable platform if the
    camera had been mounted on a bolt embedded in concrete. OK, maybe
    that is a bit of an exagerration. I dunno whether this idea would be
    feasible if the camera were mounted beneath the tripod, but it might
    be worth trying. When traveling extensively you learn to make the
    best use of what you have at hand. Just a thought. I have not
    recovered from the loss of my equipment in 1990, so I am really not up
    with currently available stuff, but I thought you or someone else
    might benefit from this technique.

    Cheers!

    --
    YOP...
     
    Nervous Nick, Mar 21, 2007
    #5
  6. DeanB

    kombizz Guest

    I DO love macro photography.
    The best tripod that I have for that work is UNILOCK which could go up to 1
    mm above the ground.

    --
    I was born and brought up in Iran, a beautiful country full of history.

    http://www.kombizz.photopoints.com/
     
    kombizz, Mar 22, 2007
    #6
  7. DeanB

    J. Clarke Guest

    kombizz wrote:
    > I DO love macro photography.
    > The best tripod that I have for that work is UNILOCK which could go
    > up to 1 mm above the ground.


    Those look like some nice tripods if you don't need light weight. Been
    looking for a tall tripod and those are now on the list to look at.

    --
    --
    --John
    to email, dial "usenet" and validate
    (was jclarke at eye bee em dot net)
     
    J. Clarke, Mar 22, 2007
    #7
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