Ghosting Hard Drive

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by bronson69@gmail.com, Apr 1, 2009.

  1. Guest

    Hi All,

    I recently bought a netbook computer and having loaded various
    programs and updated it for new drivers etc, I thought it would be a
    good idea to make a back up of the internal 80GB hard drive onto an
    unused external 80GB hard drive which I have. The aim was to have an
    exact duplicate, so that I could always go back to this point and not
    have the hassle of spending weeks loading software etc.

    Having no experience in this I asked around, and somebody at work
    suggested using Ghost software for the task.

    It took me some time to get my head around it, but I think that I have
    managed to make a copy of my internal HD onto the external one.

    However, not having any experience in this, the end result is not what
    I was expecting!

    I thought that the external HD would be identical in every way to the
    internal one. For example, I tried to boot up the netbook from the
    external HD and it did not want to know! When I went into My Computer
    to look at the properties of the external HD, it was completely full
    and the file system had been changed from NTFS to RAW (whatever that
    is). When I tried to open or explore the external HD, I could not do
    so!

    Basically, is this the expected result?

    If it is not, what is wrong? Or what have I done wrong?

    If it is, then in an emergency, if I needed to transfer the contents
    of the external HD back to the internal one and working, what would I
    need to do?

    These are probably very basic questions, so forgive my ignorance.

    I thank you all in advance for your help and suggestions.

    John
    , Apr 1, 2009
    #1
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  2. Mike Easter Guest

    wrote:

    > I recently bought a netbook computer and having loaded various
    > programs and updated it for new drivers etc, I thought it would be a
    > good idea to make a back up of the internal 80GB hard drive onto an
    > unused external 80GB hard drive which I have. The aim was to have an
    > exact duplicate, so that I could always go back to this point and not
    > have the hassle of spending weeks loading software etc.


    An exact duplicate in the form of a drive image - a disk clone.

    > Having no experience in this I asked around, and somebody at work
    > suggested using Ghost software for the task.
    >
    > It took me some time to get my head around it, but I think that I have
    > managed to make a copy of my internal HD onto the external one.


    Ghost is the name of a proprietary disk imaging program and has come to
    mean the noun or verb form of a disk image or disk clone in the same way
    that Xerox and Kleenex have come to mean photocopy and facial tissue.

    There are other pay and other free v. of such software. Personally I
    don't have any of the pay versions of Ghost, so I can't look at the Ghost
    docs.

    > However, not having any experience in this, the end result is not what
    > I was expecting!


    From what follows, it sounds like you need to read the documentation for
    your software. This newsgroup is not a substitute for that.

    > I thought that the external HD would be identical in every way to the
    > internal one. For example, I tried to boot up the netbook from the
    > external HD and it did not want to know! When I went into My Computer
    > to look at the properties of the external HD, it was completely full
    > and the file system had been changed from NTFS to RAW (whatever that
    > is). When I tried to open or explore the external HD, I could not do
    > so!


    A 'raw' copy in this context is a sector by sector copy. A 'smart' copy
    copies only those sectors of a partition which actually contain data.
    There are actually numerous versions and formats of raw files used for
    disk cloning/imaging

    > Basically, is this the expected result?


    It is expected that the image file doesn't 'look like' the filesystem of
    the partition it imaged/cloned/ghosted.

    > If it is not, what is wrong? Or what have I done wrong?
    >
    > If it is, then in an emergency, if I needed to transfer the contents
    > of the external HD back to the internal one and working, what would I
    > need to do?


    Doh. Get into your docs. That image file is what you use to restore with
    your proprietary software. (Unless your subscription has expired and you
    can't.)

    > These are probably very basic questions, so forgive my ignorance.


    They are questions which indicate that you should be reading your drive
    imaging software's documentation. Is it possible that you have a copy of
    proprietary software without documentation?




    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Apr 1, 2009
    #2
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  3. doS Guest

    run ghost and burn the image to dvds

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi All,
    >
    > I recently bought a netbook computer and having loaded various
    > programs and updated it for new drivers etc, I thought it would be a
    > good idea to make a back up of the internal 80GB hard drive onto an
    > unused external 80GB hard drive which I have. The aim was to have an
    > exact duplicate, so that I could always go back to this point and not
    > have the hassle of spending weeks loading software etc.
    >
    > Having no experience in this I asked around, and somebody at work
    > suggested using Ghost software for the task.
    >
    > It took me some time to get my head around it, but I think that I have
    > managed to make a copy of my internal HD onto the external one.
    >
    > However, not having any experience in this, the end result is not what
    > I was expecting!
    >
    > I thought that the external HD would be identical in every way to the
    > internal one. For example, I tried to boot up the netbook from the
    > external HD and it did not want to know! When I went into My Computer
    > to look at the properties of the external HD, it was completely full
    > and the file system had been changed from NTFS to RAW (whatever that
    > is). When I tried to open or explore the external HD, I could not do
    > so!
    >
    > Basically, is this the expected result?
    >
    > If it is not, what is wrong? Or what have I done wrong?
    >
    > If it is, then in an emergency, if I needed to transfer the contents
    > of the external HD back to the internal one and working, what would I
    > need to do?
    >
    > These are probably very basic questions, so forgive my ignorance.
    >
    > I thank you all in advance for your help and suggestions.
    >
    > John
    doS, Apr 2, 2009
    #3
  4. Guest

    On 2 Apr, 11:56, "Band" <> wrote:
    > <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...> Hi All,
    >
    > snip
    >
    > You can only boot from a source that you have configured into the boot
    > sequence, you have a netbook (oh dear) so the boot order won't include
    > a floppy, and probably not a CD/DVD drive (They are usually always the
    > default first in the boot order, but doubtful your unknown netbook has
    > either) So it goes through the boot order which in your case maybe
    > first checking an externally connected device, then the hard drive etc.
    > When it finds the boot.ini in the configured order, it loads.
    > Your external HDD (Firewire? USB? LAN?) is not in the boot order and
    > won't have the boot.ini. So it won't boot from that.
    > You have created a clone of your HDD configuration, which is always a
    > good idea. It is an image, and as you assumed it is to restore your
    > netbook to a known functioning previous state.
    > It seems you used NortonGhost, which is one of the established tools.
    > The usual process is to wipe the C drive or wherever the OS is installed
    > and use the the image tool to copy across the back-up image.
    > I have no experiance of NortonGhost, I have no intention of searching
    > for a tutorial for you.
    > You are a google grouper. so learn to use googles search facility.
    > Type the following search terms into google:
    > "Symantec"
    > (They produced NortonGhost, click the support link, rummage around
    > forGhost, find the tutorial.)
    > Maybe someone else has compiled a tutorial, so type:
    > "How to use NortonGhost"
    > "NortonGhosttutorial"
    > Or read the fully comprehensive guide that came supplied with software.


    Many thanks to all of you who responded!

    I work as a lecturer in a College and I spoke to one of the IT
    technicians who was surprised that a RAW file was created, which would
    seem to be a cloned copy of my internal HDD. As it was he that gave
    me a quick tutorial to use the application, he clearly must have
    missed something out because he said that it usually gives him an
    exact copy of a hard drive so that it is useable! I think that must
    be a step or command that he forgot to tell me about, or he did and I
    forgot.

    I have to see him during the Easter break and he will have a look.

    My thanks to all of you for your input!

    John
    , Apr 2, 2009
    #4
  5. Mike Easter Guest

    wrote:

    > I work as a lecturer in a College and I spoke to one of the IT
    > technicians who was surprised that a RAW file was created, which would
    > seem to be a cloned copy of my internal HDD. As it was he that gave
    > me a quick tutorial to use the application, he clearly must have
    > missed something out because he said that it usually gives him an
    > exact copy of a hard drive so that it is useable! I think that must
    > be a step or command that he forgot to tell me about, or he did and I
    > forgot.


    Here's how I interpret that paragraph above, based on the fact that Norton
    (Symantec now) Ghost is proprietary/payware; and/but the concept of disk
    cloning is generic and that there are plenty of freeware disk imagers and
    also plenty of copies of the various iterations of the proprietary Ghost
    floating around IT circles....

    He provided you a copy of Norton's Ghost but not adequate documentation
    for it. His instructions and/or your interpretation of those
    instructions, absent sufficient docs, resulted in confusion, which
    persists.

    > I have to see him during the Easter break and he will have a look.


    I don't think that the IT tech should have to hold your hand thru' the
    business of disk imaging and restoration. I'll bet that he would prefer
    that you take care of yourself in that regard. (I'm guessing that) he
    assumed that providing you with the executable would be sufficient to
    provide you with tools to take care of yourself, but that now your
    'requirements' for understanding are greater than he anticipated.

    I think that you should either get some commercial version of a disk
    imaging application with all of its associated costs and benefits, or some
    free version of a disk imaging application with its associated savings,
    and then do the necessary reading about how to handle the application and
    how it all works and not be dependent on the IT tech.

    As a college level lecturer, I would assume that you're a pretty smart
    fellow and you have the mental capacity to handle this little chore.
    Maybe you need a little help learning how to find these things.



    --
    Mike Easter
    Mike Easter, Apr 2, 2009
    #5
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