Getting Rid Of Surface Scratches?

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by (PeteCresswell), Nov 8, 2009.

  1. Getting a CRC check when I try to rip one of my DVDs.

    I'm assuming its one of the several blemishes/scratches I can see
    on the surface.

    Has anybody been successful in rubbing these things out or
    getting rid of them some other way?
    --
    PeteCresswell
    (PeteCresswell), Nov 8, 2009
    #1
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  2. Per Charlie+:
    >More info than you give is needed...
    >Type? Video or Data
    >Commercial - encoded? - or self made?


    Commercial DVD ("The Terminator" movie).

    >It is quite easy to polish out light scratches but you need to be handy,
    >patient and very careful indeed if it is a dual layer DVD.
    >The first thing is to try another reader, some are better than others!
    >Deep scratches anywhere near tangential to the tracks can be a major
    >problem.


    I've tried 3 readers and two DVD players. Nada.

    >What do you mean by blemishes? (as opposed to scratches) if they are in the
    >data layer then you have to use recovery software and put up with some data
    >loss probably.


    viz: http://tinyurl.com/yhxrpyd

    It's sounding to me like I just need to suck it up, go down to
    the local used DVD store, and buy another one.
    --
    PeteCresswell
    (PeteCresswell), Nov 8, 2009
    #2
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  3. (PeteCresswell)

    Pieyed Piper Guest

    On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 20:45:07 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" <>
    wrote:

    >Getting a CRC check when I try to rip one of my DVDs.
    >
    >I'm assuming its one of the several blemishes/scratches I can see
    >on the surface.
    >
    >Has anybody been successful in rubbing these things out or
    >getting rid of them some other way?



    The absolute best way is to never touch the optical read surface of
    your discs, thereby never having a scratch to need removal of.

    This includes placing them on a surface.

    There are only two valid places for a DVD or any optical data disc,
    especially the new HD formats as HD DVD and BluRay DVD formats.

    The best optical surface is the one that has never been touched or
    cleaned.

    1200 grit jeweler's rouge and a lot of luck might get you the surface
    quality you need to recover from lost data blocks.

    Some things go beyond what the error correction can manage on playback.
    "Ripping" usually requires a more complete, error free datagram.
    Pieyed Piper, Nov 8, 2009
    #3
  4. On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 08:43:31 +0000, Charlie+ <> wrote:

    >
    >More info than you give is needed...



    Bullshit.
    Archimedes' Lever, Nov 8, 2009
    #4
  5. (PeteCresswell)

    Pieyed Piper Guest

    On Sun, 08 Nov 2009 09:30:45 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" <>
    wrote:

    >
    >It's sounding to me like I just need to suck it up, go down to
    >the local used DVD store, and buy another one.



    That should have been your thinking as it relates to all of it. You
    should be picking up a nice, new PS3, and the BD version of the film.

    Tee Hee Hee...
    Pieyed Piper, Nov 8, 2009
    #5
  6. Per Pieyed Piper:
    >That should have been your thinking as it relates to all of it. You
    >should be picking up a nice, new PS3, and the BD version of the film.
    >
    > Tee Hee Hee...


    They're available for $6.99 or less, right? -)
    --
    PeteCresswell
    (PeteCresswell), Nov 8, 2009
    #6
  7. (PeteCresswell)

    Gilgamesh Guest

    "(PeteCresswell)" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Per Charlie+:
    >>More info than you give is needed...
    >>Type? Video or Data
    >>Commercial - encoded? - or self made?

    >
    > Commercial DVD ("The Terminator" movie).
    >
    >>It is quite easy to polish out light scratches but you need to be handy,
    >>patient and very careful indeed if it is a dual layer DVD.
    >>The first thing is to try another reader, some are better than others!
    >>Deep scratches anywhere near tangential to the tracks can be a major
    >>problem.

    >
    > I've tried 3 readers and two DVD players. Nada.
    >
    >>What do you mean by blemishes? (as opposed to scratches) if they are in
    >>the
    >>data layer then you have to use recovery software and put up with some
    >>data
    >>loss probably.

    >
    > viz: http://tinyurl.com/yhxrpyd
    >
    > It's sounding to me like I just need to suck it up, go down to
    > the local used DVD store, and buy another one.


    My local DVD store actually offers a service to polish your own DVDs for a
    couple of dollars.

    > --
    > PeteCresswell
    Gilgamesh, Nov 9, 2009
    #7
  8. (PeteCresswell)

    anthony Guest

    On 9 Nov, 22:40, "Gilgamesh" <> wrote:
    > "(PeteCresswell)" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    > > Per Charlie+:
    > >>More info than you give is needed...
    > >>Type? Video or Data
    > >>Commercial - encoded? - or self made?

    >
    > > Commercial DVD  ("The Terminator" movie).

    >
    > >>It is quite easy to polish out light scratches but you need to be handy,
    > >>patient and very careful indeed if it is a dual layer DVD.
    > >>The first thing is to try another reader,  some are better than others!
    > >>Deep scratches anywhere near tangential to the tracks can be a major
    > >>problem.

    >
    > > I've tried 3 readers and two DVD players.   Nada.

    >
    > >>What do you mean by blemishes? (as opposed to scratches) if they are in
    > >>the
    > >>data layer then you have to use recovery software and put up with some
    > >>data
    > >>loss probably.

    >
    > > viz:http://tinyurl.com/yhxrpyd

    >
    > > It's sounding to me like I just need to suck it up, go down to
    > > the local used DVD store, and buy another one.

    >
    > My local DVD store actually offers a service to polish your own DVDs for a
    > couple of dollars.
    >
    > > --
    > > PeteCresswell


    A very gentle cleaner (yes, toothpaste can do the trick) and very very
    soft cloth of the sort used to clean eyeglasses can often do the
    trick.
    However, NEVER clean in a circular motion as an earlier poster
    suggested. That will destroy most discs. Cleaning must always be done
    in straight lines from centre to rim.
    anthony, Nov 11, 2009
    #8
  9. On Thu, 12 Nov 2009 10:59:32 -0500, Kimba W Lion
    <> wrote:

    >anthony <> wrote:
    >
    >>A very gentle cleaner (yes, toothpaste can do the trick)

    >
    >I'd be wary about using toothpaste. Some of them are very abrasive.



    Jeweler's rogue can be bought usually from any hobby store or supply
    site.

    It is really simple to do it right.
    Archimedes' Lever, Nov 14, 2009
    #9
  10. (PeteCresswell)

    lugnut Guest

    On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 20:45:07 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" <>
    wrote:

    >Getting a CRC check when I try to rip one of my DVDs.
    >
    >I'm assuming its one of the several blemishes/scratches I can see
    >on the surface.
    >
    >Has anybody been successful in rubbing these things out or
    >getting rid of them some other way?
    >--
    >PeteCresswell


    Well, while we're throwing out crazy ideas here, might as well throw
    out one of the craziest... ever heard of boiling a disc?

    I'd read it online somewhere and was skeptical, then tried it on a
    couple discs I had around with minor-looking scratches that wouldn't
    rip...and damned if it didn't work. For one of 'em, anyway - no go on
    the other. I've tried it a few times since and the success rate is
    pretty much 50/50, sometimes it does the trick, sometimes not, and if
    the scratches are big, it probably won't do a thing.

    I admit it sounds stupid, but just boil a pot of water and toss the
    disc in, play-side down. Let it sit for a couple minutes, take it out
    and dry it off and see what happens. I've never had any discs melt or
    otherwise get screwed up, though I don't know if one would want to try
    it on a DVDR/CDR.



    -lugnut
    lugnut, Nov 14, 2009
    #10
  11. (PeteCresswell)

    anthony Guest

    On Nov 15, 4:00 am, (lugnut) wrote:
    > On Sat, 07 Nov 2009 20:45:07 -0500, "(PeteCresswell)" <>
    > wrote:
    >
    > >Getting a CRC check when I try to rip one of my DVDs.

    >
    > >I'm assuming its one of the several blemishes/scratches I can see
    > >on the surface.

    >
    > >Has anybody been successful in rubbing these things out or
    > >getting rid of them some other way?
    > >--
    > >PeteCresswell

    >
    > Well, while we're throwing out crazy ideas here, might as well throw
    > out one of the craziest... ever heard of boiling a disc?
    >
    > I'd read it online somewhere and was skeptical, then tried it on a
    > couple discs I had around with minor-looking scratches that wouldn't
    > rip...and damned if it didn't work.  For one of 'em, anyway - no go on
    > the other.  I've tried it a few times since and the success rate is
    > pretty much 50/50, sometimes it does the trick, sometimes not, and if
    > the scratches are big, it probably won't do a thing.
    >
    > I admit it sounds stupid, but just boil a pot of water and toss the
    > disc in, play-side down.  Let it sit for a couple minutes, take it out
    > and dry it off and see what happens.  I've never had any discs melt or
    > otherwise get screwed up, though I don't know if one would want to try
    > it on a DVDR/CDR.
    >
    > -lugnut


    And for the really difficult repair jobs -- download from internet the
    free program Exact Audio Copy (EAC). I've used this to do flawless
    digital rips of discs that none of my standalone CD players could
    navigate -- perhaps because EAC is programmed to try to get data
    several times from damaged arrors. I then simply burn a replacement
    disc and throw out the original. Just had to to that in a six-disc
    Billie Holiday Complete Verve Master Studio Takes edition -- the
    original was badly scuffed and wouldn't play; my replacement copy is
    perfect in every way.
    Anthony
    anthony, Nov 16, 2009
    #11
  12. "(PeteCresswell)" <> wrote:
    >Getting a CRC check when I try to rip one of my DVDs.
    >I'm assuming its one of the several blemishes/scratches I can see
    >on the surface.
    >Has anybody been successful in rubbing these things out or
    >getting rid of them some other way?


    Here's my sequence of dvd rehab techniques. I've used these
    techniques literally hundreds of times.

    1. I apply a few drops of STP "Son of a Gun protectant" rub it over
    the surface of the disk and let it sit for a while. While I have not
    used ArmorAll for this, they appear to be similar/same substances.
    Wipe/remove/dry with a soft bit of cloth and give it a whirl.

    2. If that doesn't work I spray a little bit of WD-40 on the disk,
    rub it around and let it sit. Then I gently wipe/remove with a soft
    cloth. I leave a thin sheen of WD-40 to "bridge" the scratches.

    2.5 If these still don't work, I coat the disk liberally with either
    of these and leave overnight. Then try again. I'll put an STP'd disk
    into a closed case so it doesn't dry up.

    3. If still no joy, I'll use toothpaste then rinse off and coat with
    either STP or WD40. An ancient tube of Colgate Baking Soda and
    Peroxide has some nice tooth to it and levels out some fairly bad
    scratches, then the STP or WD40 fills in the new, smaller scratches
    and I get my read/rip.

    Now if you have access to a real, commercial grade disk polisher,
    that's the way to go.

    PPS

    A fictional account of how to drastically reform the financial world...
    More at http://PinstripeSniper.blogspot.com and if that gets banned, check
    www.PinstripeSniper.com
    PinstripeSniper, Nov 17, 2009
    #12
  13. (PeteCresswell)

    jeremy Guest

    >Getting a CRC check when I try to rip one of my DVDs.

    >I'm assuming its one of the several blemishes/scratches I can see
    >on the surface.


    >Has anybody been successful in rubbing these things out or
    >getting rid of them some other way?


    The absolute best way is to never touch the optical read surface of
    your discs, thereby never having a scratch to need removal of.

    This includes placing them on a surface.

    There are only two valid places for a DVD or any optical data disc,
    especially the new HD formats as HD DVD and BluRay DVD formats.

    The best optical surface is the one that has never been touched or
    cleaned.

    1200 grit jeweler's rouge and a lot of luck might get you the
    surface
    quality you need to recover from lost data blocks.

    Some things go beyond what the error correction can manage on
    playback.
    "Ripping" usually requires a more complete, error free datagram.
    jeremy, Nov 26, 2009
    #13
  14. Per jeremy:
    > The absolute best way is to never touch the optical read surface of
    >your discs, thereby never having a scratch to need removal of.
    >
    > This includes placing them on a surface.
    >
    > There are only two valid places for a DVD or any optical data disc,
    >especially the new HD formats as HD DVD and BluRay DVD formats.
    >
    > The best optical surface is the one that has never been touched or


    100% agreement on that.

    The rub comes when somebody doesn't center the DVD in the drive
    tray and the tray tries to pull it into the device.
    --
    PeteCresswell
    (PeteCresswell), Nov 26, 2009
    #14
  15. (PeteCresswell)

    Simmon Guest

    >It's sounding to me like I just need to suck it up, go down to
    >the local used DVD store, and buy another one.


    That should have been your thinking as it relates to all of it. You
    should be picking up a nice, new PS3, and the BD version of the film.
    Simmon, Nov 27, 2009
    #15
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