Getting MSCE

Discussion in 'MCSE' started by aantozz, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. aantozz

    aantozz Guest

    Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or MSCA.
    aantozz, Jun 6, 2008
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. aantozz

    John R Guest

    "aantozz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
    > MSCA.
    >


    Follow these links...
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcsa/windows2003/default.mspx
    http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/windows2003/default.mspx

    You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
    MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
    and an elective.

    For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
    exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
    can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
    to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.

    MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
    Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
    or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.

    Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
    there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
    Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.

    You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
    you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
    is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
    Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
    videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
    It's up to you.

    For more information on finding training resources, see
    www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
    information on scheduling a test in your area.

    John R
    John R, Jun 6, 2008
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. aantozz

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >> Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    >> The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    >> bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    >> study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
    >> MSCA.
    >>

    >
    >Follow yellow brick road


    ifypfy

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    Kline Sphere, Jun 6, 2008
    #3
  4. aantozz

    aantozz Guest

    Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go straight
    for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?

    "John R" wrote:

    >
    > "aantozz" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    > > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    > > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    > > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
    > > MSCA.
    > >

    >
    > Follow these links...
    > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcsa/windows2003/default.mspx
    > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/windows2003/default.mspx
    >
    > You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
    > MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
    > and an elective.
    >
    > For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
    > exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
    > can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
    > to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.
    >
    > MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
    > Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
    > or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.
    >
    > Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
    > there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
    > Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.
    >
    > You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
    > you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
    > is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
    > Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
    > videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
    > It's up to you.
    >
    > For more information on finding training resources, see
    > www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
    > information on scheduling a test in your area.
    >
    > John R
    >
    >
    aantozz, Jun 6, 2008
    #4
  5. aantozz

    Yann Guest

    Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a MCP, so
    you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big plus on your
    resume.

    "aantozz" wrote:

    > Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go straight
    > for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?
    >
    > "John R" wrote:
    >
    > >
    > > "aantozz" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > > > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    > > > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    > > > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    > > > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
    > > > MSCA.
    > > >

    > >
    > > Follow these links...
    > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcsa/windows2003/default.mspx
    > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/windows2003/default.mspx
    > >
    > > You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
    > > MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
    > > and an elective.
    > >
    > > For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
    > > exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
    > > can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
    > > to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.
    > >
    > > MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
    > > Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
    > > or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.
    > >
    > > Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
    > > there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
    > > Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.
    > >
    > > You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
    > > you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
    > > is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
    > > Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
    > > videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
    > > It's up to you.
    > >
    > > For more information on finding training resources, see
    > > www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
    > > information on scheduling a test in your area.
    > >
    > > John R
    > >
    > >
    Yann, Jun 7, 2008
    #5
  6. >
    > "aantozz" wrote:
    >
    >> Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go
    >> straight
    >> for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?


    "Yann" <> wrote in message
    news:D...
    > Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a MCP,
    > so
    > you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big plus on your
    > resume.


    Keep in mind, however, there is a lot of *NEW* stuff in Windows Server 2008.

    If you're relying upon your expertise with Windows Server 2003 (which you
    should), then you'll have to put a bit of extra effort into addressing those
    capabilities, features, and tools that are new to Windows Server 2008.

    Of particular note in the MCITP track is the new exam on Application
    Infrastructure, which has never before existed in any Microsoft
    certification track. Prevoiusly the MCSE focused on AD, Network
    Infrastructure, and general Server Administration -- now you also need to be
    competent in Applications Infrastructure (IIS, Terminal Services,
    Virtualization).

    --
    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP(x2), MCTS(x5), MCP(x7), MCBMSP
    Senior Data Architect, APQC, Houston, Texas
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2008)

    MS WSUS Website: http://www.microsoft.com/wsus
    My Websites: http://www.onsitechsolutions.com;
    http://wsusinfo.onsitechsolutions.com
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    Lawrence Garvin, Jun 7, 2008
    #6
  7. aantozz

    Kline Sphere Guest

    > a big plus on your
    >resume.


    just like aids would

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    Kline Sphere, Jun 9, 2008
    #7
  8. aantozz

    kpg Guest

    =?Utf-8?B?WWFubg==?= <> wrote in
    news:D:

    > Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a
    > MCP, so you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big
    > plus on your resume.


    Happy belated PotD
    kpg, Jun 9, 2008
    #8
  9. aantozz

    OTHMAN Guest

    "Yann" wrote:

    > Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a MCP, so
    > you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big plus on your
    > resume.
    >
    > "aantozz" wrote:
    >
    > > Thank you guys. Now that you mentioned 2008 server John, Can I go straight
    > > for the 2008 server without doing the 2003?
    > >
    > > "John R" wrote:
    > >
    > > >
    > > > "aantozz" <> wrote in message
    > > > news:...
    > > > > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    > > > > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    > > > > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    > > > > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or
    > > > > MSCA.
    > > > >
    > > >
    > > > Follow these links...
    > > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcsa/windows2003/default.mspx
    > > > http://www.microsoft.com/learning/mcp/mcse/windows2003/default.mspx
    > > >
    > > > You will see that there are basically seven requirements (tests) to earn
    > > > MCSE. There are 4 core exams on Server 2003, a client exam, a design exam,
    > > > and an elective.
    > > >
    > > > For MCSA there are four requirements, the first two core exams, the client
    > > > exam, and most of the electives are all the same, so on the way to MCSE, you
    > > > can/will earn MCSA. I think that most people work towards MCSA on their way
    > > > to MCSE although nothing says you have to do that.
    > > >
    > > > MCSA and MCSE are two different (but closely related) jobs. MCSA or System
    > > > Administrator is just that, manage and maintain system administration. MCSE
    > > > or System Engineer is more for people who design and implement networks.
    > > >
    > > > Note that MCSA/MCSE stops at Windows Server 2003. For Windows Server 2008,
    > > > there are different (but comparable) certifications called MCITP - System
    > > > Administrator and MCITP - Enterprise Administrator.
    > > >
    > > > You can complete these tests in any order, and you can train for them (if
    > > > you like) any way that you like. The best training for any of these exams
    > > > is going to be experience. You can supplement that with books from MS
    > > > Press, or any other number of publishers. Some vendors (like TestOut) make
    > > > videos. There are even places you can get classroom training if you like.
    > > > It's up to you.
    > > >
    > > > For more information on finding training resources, see
    > > > www.microsoft.com/learning. Contact prometric (www.prometric.com) for
    > > > information on scheduling a test in your area.
    > > >
    > > > John R
    > > >


    not bad
    OTHMAN, Jun 9, 2008
    #9
  10. aantozz

    Kline Sphere Guest

    >> Sure you can. It's even better if you haven't started yet becoming a
    >> MCP, so you will have a fresh view of the new technology and a big
    >> plus on your resume.

    >
    >Happy belated PotD


    sure made me laugh!

    Kline Sphere (Chalk) MCNGP #3
    Kline Sphere, Jun 9, 2008
    #10
  11. aantozz

    aantozz Guest

    Thanks guys. I've been reading that most employers don't actually look at the
    new certifications like the 2008 server yet and that is what has also got me
    concerned about going straight for it or just starting with the 2003 then
    doing the exam to upgrade to 2008.
    Anybody know a good book for self study I could use?
    aantozz, Jun 10, 2008
    #11
  12. "aantozz" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Thanks guys. I've been reading that most employers don't actually look at
    > the
    > new certifications like the 2008 server yet and that is what has also got
    > me
    > concerned about going straight for it or just starting with the 2003 then
    > doing the exam to upgrade to 2008.


    Employers who are specifically looking for experience and certifications on
    =Windows 2008= will be familiar with what they're looking for.

    Employers who don't have a clue and are just looking for letters as an
    indication of skill and expertise are probably better left alone.

    You'll be able to tell the difference in the interview. Those in the former
    category will actually have a clue; those in the latter won't == about
    anything!

    Those in the former category will also likely already have a Windows Server
    2008 system deployed, in testing, or will be specifically asking you about
    your experience with such.

    When in doubt whether a prospective employer understands your
    certifications,
    start by asking them if they have any of that product actually deployed,
    or what their timeframe is for getting one deployed.

    If they have no plans for putting a Windows Server 2008 system into
    production,
    they probably don't have a clue about the value of the certifications.

    > Anybody know a good book for self study I could use?


    Right now Windows Server 2008 books are in short supply. I used Mitch
    Tullich's "Introducing Windows Server 2008" (MSPress) -- and possibly still
    available from Microsoft eLearning as a free download. I also used the
    Microsoft eLearning courseware for Windows Server 2008. But, by far, the
    *best* source, currently, is the Windows Server 2008 Technical Library
    (FREE) at
    http://technet2.microsoft.com/windo...bab0f1a1-54aa-4cef-9164-139e8bcc44751033.mspx


    As to the question of 2003 vs 2008 -- you need to make that choice based
    upon yourself, and yourself only.

    [1] Where is your =experience=. If you've never laid hands on a Windows
    Server 2008 system, I'd suggest first documenting your actual experience
    with the Windows Server 2003 certs (and the MCSA).

    [2] Where do you want to =work=. If you want to leverage your experience
    =and= certs and be hired into the top of the totem pole in a solid Win2003
    shop, then the Win2008 certs won't be of much use to you at this point --
    unless you already have the MCSE.

    If you're specifically looking for a job in a Windows Server 2008 shop, then
    hit the books, learn the product backwards and forwards, and go take the
    tests. If you're an MCITP:SA and interviewing with a shop eager to deploy
    Windows Server 2008 systems... they *will* know the certs they're interested
    in seeking out (and they'll know an MCSE won't be much help if they're
    looking to deploy any of those NEW Windows Server 2008 features). (And, to
    repeat myself, if they don't appear to know that -- then run in the other
    direction as fast as you can. The last thing you want to be is 3 months into
    a job with an employer who doesn't have a clue about what's involved in
    deploying new server technologies -- or why they'd be doing it.)






    --
    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP(x2), MCTS(x5), MCP(x7), MCBMSP
    Senior Data Architect, APQC, Houston, Texas
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2008)

    MS WSUS Website: http://www.microsoft.com/wsus
    My Websites: http://www.onsitechsolutions.com;
    http://wsusinfo.onsitechsolutions.com
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    Lawrence Garvin, Jun 11, 2008
    #12
  13. aantozz

    aantozz Guest

    What you said does make a whole lotta sence Lawrence.
    thanks

    "Lawrence Garvin" wrote:

    > "aantozz" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Thanks guys. I've been reading that most employers don't actually look at
    > > the
    > > new certifications like the 2008 server yet and that is what has also got
    > > me
    > > concerned about going straight for it or just starting with the 2003 then
    > > doing the exam to upgrade to 2008.

    >
    > Employers who are specifically looking for experience and certifications on
    > =Windows 2008= will be familiar with what they're looking for.
    >
    > Employers who don't have a clue and are just looking for letters as an
    > indication of skill and expertise are probably better left alone.
    >
    > You'll be able to tell the difference in the interview. Those in the former
    > category will actually have a clue; those in the latter won't == about
    > anything!
    >
    > Those in the former category will also likely already have a Windows Server
    > 2008 system deployed, in testing, or will be specifically asking you about
    > your experience with such.
    >
    > When in doubt whether a prospective employer understands your
    > certifications,
    > start by asking them if they have any of that product actually deployed,
    > or what their timeframe is for getting one deployed.
    >
    > If they have no plans for putting a Windows Server 2008 system into
    > production,
    > they probably don't have a clue about the value of the certifications.
    >
    > > Anybody know a good book for self study I could use?

    >
    > Right now Windows Server 2008 books are in short supply. I used Mitch
    > Tullich's "Introducing Windows Server 2008" (MSPress) -- and possibly still
    > available from Microsoft eLearning as a free download. I also used the
    > Microsoft eLearning courseware for Windows Server 2008. But, by far, the
    > *best* source, currently, is the Windows Server 2008 Technical Library
    > (FREE) at
    > http://technet2.microsoft.com/windo...bab0f1a1-54aa-4cef-9164-139e8bcc44751033.mspx
    >
    >
    > As to the question of 2003 vs 2008 -- you need to make that choice based
    > upon yourself, and yourself only.
    >
    > [1] Where is your =experience=. If you've never laid hands on a Windows
    > Server 2008 system, I'd suggest first documenting your actual experience
    > with the Windows Server 2003 certs (and the MCSA).
    >
    > [2] Where do you want to =work=. If you want to leverage your experience
    > =and= certs and be hired into the top of the totem pole in a solid Win2003
    > shop, then the Win2008 certs won't be of much use to you at this point --
    > unless you already have the MCSE.
    >
    > If you're specifically looking for a job in a Windows Server 2008 shop, then
    > hit the books, learn the product backwards and forwards, and go take the
    > tests. If you're an MCITP:SA and interviewing with a shop eager to deploy
    > Windows Server 2008 systems... they *will* know the certs they're interested
    > in seeking out (and they'll know an MCSE won't be much help if they're
    > looking to deploy any of those NEW Windows Server 2008 features). (And, to
    > repeat myself, if they don't appear to know that -- then run in the other
    > direction as fast as you can. The last thing you want to be is 3 months into
    > a job with an employer who doesn't have a clue about what's involved in
    > deploying new server technologies -- or why they'd be doing it.)
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP(x2), MCTS(x5), MCP(x7), MCBMSP
    > Senior Data Architect, APQC, Houston, Texas
    > Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2008)
    >
    > MS WSUS Website: http://www.microsoft.com/wsus
    > My Websites: http://www.onsitechsolutions.com;
    > http://wsusinfo.onsitechsolutions.com
    > My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    >
    aantozz, Jun 11, 2008
    #13
  14. aantozz

    Guest

    On Jun 6, 7:19 pm, aantozz <> wrote:
    > Hi all. I'm sort of new to this and am considering going for the MCSE.
    > The web site has a whole lot of usefull info but I just want to know;
    > bieng new to this, what exactly do I need to get started. I prefer to self
    > study and then sit for the exam. Also is it better to start with MCSE or MSCA.


    i am mcse. i use library & books & becum mcse very well.
    , Jun 14, 2008
    #14
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. James

    MSCE/MCSA network differences?

    James, Nov 23, 2003, in forum: Microsoft Certification
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    630
  2. =?Utf-8?B?QW5keSBTbWl0aA==?=

    Saying you're an MSCE when you're not

    =?Utf-8?B?QW5keSBTbWl0aA==?=, Oct 5, 2005, in forum: Microsoft Certification
    Replies:
    13
    Views:
    980
    =?Utf-8?B?Sm11YWRpYg==?=
    Oct 18, 2005
  3. m33p
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    1,027
    Consultant
    Jul 8, 2003
  4. Valentino Plummer

    MSCE vrs MCP

    Valentino Plummer, Jul 14, 2003, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    2,073
    scoobee
    Jul 21, 2003
  5. =?Utf-8?B?QmFzaWNHcmFmaXg=?=

    Career, Getting started, MSCE the way to go?

    =?Utf-8?B?QmFzaWNHcmFmaXg=?=, Oct 18, 2005, in forum: MCSE
    Replies:
    69
    Views:
    1,354
Loading...

Share This Page