Getting maximum network throughput

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by Paul_B, Jun 20, 2006.

  1. Paul_B

    Paul_B Guest

    I'm on Verizon's FIOS network, and I just ran a speed test which
    came in at 10Mb/s.

    The test advised that the critical speed restriction was with the
    client 10M network. Here's the detailed summary:

    __________________
    /
    | estimate = 29.02 based on packet size = 11Kbits, RTT =
    | 381.74msec, and loss = 1.0E-6 The theoretical network limit is
    | 29.02 Mbps The NDT server has a 8192.0 KByte buffer which
    | limits the throughput to 167.65 Mbps Your PC/Workstation has a
    | 510.0 KByte buffer which limits the throughput to 10.44 Mbps
    | The network based flow control limits the throughput to 10.47
    | Mbps
    |
    | Client Data reports link is 'Ethernet', Client Acks report
    | link is 'Ethernet' Server Data reports link is '10 Gig',
    | Server Acks report link is 'Ethernet'
    \____________________



    I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to remove
    restrictions. I have a 10/100 net card, and I'm unaware of
    anything faster. I've run online network configurators, but what
    of this 510KByte local buffer that limits me to 10Mb? Can I up
    that to the server's 8192K setting?

    Thanks,
    p.
    Paul_B, Jun 20, 2006
    #1
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  2. Paul_B

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Paul_B wrote:

    > I'm on Verizon's FIOS network, and I just ran a speed test which
    > came in at 10Mb/s.
    >
    > The test advised that the critical speed restriction was with the
    > client 10M network. Here's the detailed summary:
    >
    > __________________
    > /
    > | estimate = 29.02 based on packet size = 11Kbits, RTT =
    > | 381.74msec, and loss = 1.0E-6 The theoretical network limit is
    > | 29.02 Mbps The NDT server has a 8192.0 KByte buffer which
    > | limits the throughput to 167.65 Mbps Your PC/Workstation has a
    > | 510.0 KByte buffer which limits the throughput to 10.44 Mbps
    > | The network based flow control limits the throughput to 10.47
    > | Mbps
    > |
    > | Client Data reports link is 'Ethernet', Client Acks report
    > | link is 'Ethernet' Server Data reports link is '10 Gig',
    > | Server Acks report link is 'Ethernet'
    > \____________________
    >
    >
    >
    > I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to remove
    > restrictions. I have a 10/100 net card, and I'm unaware of
    > anything faster. I've run online network configurators, but what
    > of this 510KByte local buffer that limits me to 10Mb? Can I up
    > that to the server's 8192K setting?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > p.


    Your 10/100 is probably set to auto-negotiate. Try forcing it to 100Mbps.
    Rick Merrill, Jun 20, 2006
    #2
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  3. Paul_B

    why? Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 11:45:06 GMT, Paul_B wrote:

    >I'm on Verizon's FIOS network, and I just ran a speed test which
    >came in at 10Mb/s.


    The actual speed of the connection as purchased is?

    For example in my setup, ISP is 10Mbps/384kbps. With an old netgear
    router (10Mbps/half duplex) d/l speed is max 6127kbps to 4120kbps. A
    more modern Belkin router gave about 8000kbps. Same PC on a Gb switch
    running 1Gbps/Full duplex.

    However doing 3 files copies in multiple directions and FTP on 3Gbps
    connected PCs, it maxes out on the internal LAN at near 68Mbps.

    >The test advised that the critical speed restriction was with the
    >client 10M network. Here's the detailed summary:
    >
    > __________________
    > /
    >| estimate = 29.02 based on packet size = 11Kbits, RTT =
    >| 381.74msec, and loss = 1.0E-6 The theoretical network limit is
    >| 29.02 Mbps The NDT server has a 8192.0 KByte buffer which


    That's the 30Mbps package? Notice the work theoretical, it's actually
    had to swamp a connection just by downloading. Although 1 DVD / FTP
    session at work can swamp the incoming 21Mbps ATM WAN.

    Generally d/l's aren't from the best available source your ISP news (say
    a DVD) or your ISP FTP server. Anything from outside your ISP is always
    slower.

    >| limits the throughput to 167.65 Mbps Your PC/Workstation has a
    >| 510.0 KByte buffer which limits the throughput to 10.44 Mbps
    >| The network based flow control limits the throughput to 10.47
    >| Mbps
    >|
    >| Client Data reports link is 'Ethernet', Client Acks report
    >| link is 'Ethernet' Server Data reports link is '10 Gig',


    10Gig?

    >| Server Acks report link is 'Ethernet'
    > \____________________
    >
    >
    >
    >I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to remove
    >restrictions. I have a 10/100 net card, and I'm unaware of


    Brand / model of NIC?

    It's assumed there is the ISP - some box - NIC in PC. You can't do much
    about the some box bit but you should check the NIC in your PC matches
    the settings at the Ethernet end of the some box. You may have the NIC
    set to auto detect speed and duplex. It's a possibility to get better
    speed by setting the NIC manually to match the settings, i.e. 100Mbps /
    Full Duplex.

    You usually only get near 100Mbps (or 200Mbps, full duplex) speeds on 2
    way simultaneous transfers.

    >anything faster. I've run online network configurators, but what
    >of this 510KByte local buffer that limits me to 10Mb? Can I up
    >that to the server's 8192K setting?


    Server class NICs tend to be better than PC NICs, and cost more.

    You may be better off, trying an experiment or 2.

    Getting a 1Gbps NIC, even though it's way more then the spped of the
    connection it will have a faster processing unit then the 10/100. It may
    also be worth a Google about looking for info on the NIC feature
    offloading checksums. A lot of modern NICs do this in hardware rather
    then the PC expending the effort in doing it. It's best to do some
    reading first to see if it's going to be any gain , a few % or not. It's
    an option in the NIC driver properties you can turn on or off.

    Other limits, hardisk, PCI bus speed of NIC (PCI-X IIRC less so) , any
    AV scanners / FW inspection will also limit speed.

    >Thanks,
    >p.


    Me
    why?, Jun 20, 2006
    #3
  4. Paul_B

    Paul_B Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 18:32:40 GMT, why? wrote:

    > On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 11:45:06 GMT, Paul_B wrote:
    >
    >>I'm on Verizon's FIOS network, and I just ran a speed test which
    >>came in at 10Mb/s.

    >
    > The actual speed of the connection as purchased is?
    >
    > For example in my setup, ISP is 10Mbps/384kbps. With an old netgear
    > router (10Mbps/half duplex) d/l speed is max 6127kbps to 4120kbps. A
    > more modern Belkin router gave about 8000kbps. Same PC on a Gb switch
    > running 1Gbps/Full duplex.
    >
    > However doing 3 files copies in multiple directions and FTP on 3Gbps
    > connected PCs, it maxes out on the internal LAN at near 68Mbps.
    >
    >>The test advised that the critical speed restriction was with the
    >>client 10M network. Here's the detailed summary:
    >>
    >> __________________
    >> /
    >>| estimate = 29.02 based on packet size = 11Kbits, RTT =
    >>| 381.74msec, and loss = 1.0E-6 The theoretical network limit is
    >>| 29.02 Mbps The NDT server has a 8192.0 KByte buffer which

    >
    > That's the 30Mbps package? Notice the work theoretical, it's actually
    > had to swamp a connection just by downloading. Although 1 DVD / FTP
    > session at work can swamp the incoming 21Mbps ATM WAN.
    >
    > Generally d/l's aren't from the best available source your ISP news (say
    > a DVD) or your ISP FTP server. Anything from outside your ISP is always
    > slower.
    >
    >>| limits the throughput to 167.65 Mbps Your PC/Workstation has a
    >>| 510.0 KByte buffer which limits the throughput to 10.44 Mbps
    >>| The network based flow control limits the throughput to 10.47
    >>| Mbps
    >>|
    >>| Client Data reports link is 'Ethernet', Client Acks report
    >>| link is 'Ethernet' Server Data reports link is '10 Gig',

    >
    > 10Gig?
    >
    >>| Server Acks report link is 'Ethernet'
    >> \____________________
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to remove
    >>restrictions. I have a 10/100 net card, and I'm unaware of

    >
    > Brand / model of NIC?
    >
    > It's assumed there is the ISP - some box - NIC in PC. You can't do much
    > about the some box bit but you should check the NIC in your PC matches
    > the settings at the Ethernet end of the some box. You may have the NIC
    > set to auto detect speed and duplex. It's a possibility to get better
    > speed by setting the NIC manually to match the settings, i.e. 100Mbps /
    > Full Duplex.
    >
    > You usually only get near 100Mbps (or 200Mbps, full duplex) speeds on 2
    > way simultaneous transfers.
    >
    >>anything faster. I've run online network configurators, but what
    >>of this 510KByte local buffer that limits me to 10Mb? Can I up
    >>that to the server's 8192K setting?

    >
    > Server class NICs tend to be better than PC NICs, and cost more.
    >
    > You may be better off, trying an experiment or 2.
    >
    > Getting a 1Gbps NIC, even though it's way more then the spped of the
    > connection it will have a faster processing unit then the 10/100. It may
    > also be worth a Google about looking for info on the NIC feature
    > offloading checksums. A lot of modern NICs do this in hardware rather
    > then the PC expending the effort in doing it. It's best to do some
    > reading first to see if it's going to be any gain , a few % or not. It's
    > an option in the NIC driver properties you can turn on or off.
    >
    > Other limits, hardisk, PCI bus speed of NIC (PCI-X IIRC less so) , any
    > AV scanners / FW inspection will also limit speed.
    >
    >>Thanks,
    >>p.

    >
    > Me



    The connection is nominally 10Mb/s down and I think 2Mb/s up. The
    NIC is a netgear FA311 10/100.

    So I'm content with getting the better part of 10M down (it
    varies), but the wording of the test summary seemed to imply that
    my card or some local machine (computer or router), and the 510
    KB buffer in particular, was the only bottleneck to much more
    speed.

    I looked in the netgear's properties and found the receive buffer
    size set to 40. I'm trying, without success, to download
    netgear's driver for the card and to find out their suggestions
    for setting this parameter.

    It's hard to imagine Verizon is going to give away extra
    bandwidth for free, but that's what I inferred from the test's
    summary.

    Thanks,
    p.
    Paul_B, Jun 20, 2006
    #4
  5. Paul_B

    why? Guest

    On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 22:19:00 GMT, Paul_B wrote:

    >On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 18:32:40 GMT, why? wrote:
    >
    >> On Tue, 20 Jun 2006 11:45:06 GMT, Paul_B wrote:
    >>
    >>>I'm on Verizon's FIOS network, and I just ran a speed test which
    >>>came in at 10Mb/s.

    >>
    >> The actual speed of the connection as purchased is?
    >>
    >> For example in my setup, ISP is 10Mbps/384kbps. With an old netgear
    >> router (10Mbps/half duplex) d/l speed is max 6127kbps to 4120kbps. A
    >> more modern Belkin router gave about 8000kbps. Same PC on a Gb switch
    >> running 1Gbps/Full duplex.


    <snip>

    >>>I'm wondering if there's anything I can do to remove
    >>>restrictions. I have a 10/100 net card, and I'm unaware of

    >>
    >> Brand / model of NIC?
    >>
    >> It's assumed there is the ISP - some box - NIC in PC. You can't do much
    >> about the some box bit but you should check the NIC in your PC matches
    >> the settings at the Ethernet end of the some box. You may have the NIC
    >> set to auto detect speed and duplex. It's a possibility to get better
    >> speed by setting the NIC manually to match the settings, i.e. 100Mbps /
    >> Full Duplex.
    >>

    <snip>

    >>>Thanks,
    >>>p.

    >>
    >> Me

    >
    >
    >The connection is nominally 10Mb/s down and I think 2Mb/s up. The
    >NIC is a netgear FA311 10/100.


    I used to have some of those , don't anymore went to 3Com PCI 905TX-M
    something or other many years ago. Then with the cheap Gbps switch
    changed those to Intel Pro1000MT/GT types 2 years ago.

    >So I'm content with getting the better part of 10M down (it
    >varies), but the wording of the test summary seemed to imply that
    >my card or some local machine (computer or router), and the 510
    >KB buffer in particular, was the only bottleneck to much more
    >speed.


    You can check the NIC specs / Netgear support.

    >I looked in the netgear's properties and found the receive buffer
    >size set to 40. I'm trying, without success, to download
    >netgear's driver for the card and to find out their suggestions
    >for setting this parameter.
    >
    >It's hard to imagine Verizon is going to give away extra
    >bandwidth for free, but that's what I inferred from the test's
    >summary.


    Just wondering if the 10G if the backend of the server, this would make
    sense to share that out over the customer base. Also in a similar way
    provide 10/100Mbps uplinks to PC but again the connection rate is
    throttled to the purchased account speed.

    >Thanks,
    >p.


    YW.

    Me
    why?, Jun 21, 2006
    #5
  6. Paul_B

    Paul_B Guest

    On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 17:13:29 GMT, why? wrote:


    > You can check the NIC specs / Netgear support.



    I'm going to have to go back into the box, to get the serial # at
    the least, without which netgear support doesn't exist. But I'll
    also see if the onboard NIC performs comparably to the card; if
    so I can reclaim a PCI slot.

    >>I looked in the netgear's properties and found the receive buffer
    >>size set to 40. I'm trying, without success, to download
    >>netgear's driver for the card and to find out their suggestions
    >>for setting this parameter.
    >>
    >>It's hard to imagine Verizon is going to give away extra
    >>bandwidth for free, but that's what I inferred from the test's
    >>summary.

    >
    > Just wondering if the 10G if the backend of the server, this would make
    > sense to share that out over the customer base. Also in a similar way
    > provide 10/100Mbps uplinks to PC but again the connection rate is
    > throttled to the purchased account speed.



    Something like that is likely. FIOS is capable of some 640Mb/s
    down; all they need to do is throw the switch. This could be a
    simple matter of terminology, whereby the test site attributes
    Verizon's throughput constraints to the end user.

    Meanwhile, would love to know if the setting of 40 for "received
    buffer count" is adequate for a system like this.

    Thanks,
    p.
    Paul_B, Jun 21, 2006
    #6
  7. Paul_B

    why? Guest

    On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 18:34:49 GMT, Paul_B wrote:

    >On Wed, 21 Jun 2006 17:13:29 GMT, why? wrote:
    >
    >
    >> You can check the NIC specs / Netgear support.

    >
    >
    >I'm going to have to go back into the box, to get the serial # at
    >the least, without which netgear support doesn't exist. But I'll
    >also see if the onboard NIC performs comparably to the card; if
    >so I can reclaim a PCI slot.


    Just watch there are divverent drivers at the NG site, v1 and v2 of the
    NIC.

    >>>It's hard to imagine Verizon is going to give away extra
    >>>bandwidth for free, but that's what I inferred from the test's
    >>>summary.

    >>
    >> Just wondering if the 10G if the backend of the server, this would make
    >> sense to share that out over the customer base. Also in a similar way
    >> provide 10/100Mbps uplinks to PC but again the connection rate is
    >> throttled to the purchased account speed.

    >
    >
    >Something like that is likely. FIOS is capable of some 640Mb/s
    >down; all they need to do is throw the switch. This could be a
    >simple matter of terminology, whereby the test site attributes
    >Verizon's throughput constraints to the end user.
    >
    >Meanwhile, would love to know if the setting of 40 for "received
    >buffer count" is adequate for a system like this.


    Me too :) not a setting I have changed before.

    Intel Pro1000GT has Receive Descriptors, 256.
    Buffers used by driver when copying data to protocol memory, increasing
    can enhance performance , but consumes system memory. Each is 2KB of
    memory.

    >Thanks,
    >p.


    Me
    why?, Jun 21, 2006
    #7
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