fyi: visual studio express editions - get them while there free

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Steven H, Nov 8, 2005.

  1. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    just a fyi for thoes who are intrested

    Visual Studio .net 2005 has just been RTM'd and it brings along with it a
    lot of good tools, however for the rest of us mortals who dont have access
    to a MSDN Subscription or a healthy bank balance Microsoft have developed
    a set of development tools (targeted towards casual / hobby developers) called
    Visual Studio Express Editions.

    Visual Studio Express editions come in several flavors :

    Visual Basic Express (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/vb/)
    C# Express (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualcsharp/)
    J# Express (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualj/)
    C++ Express (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualc/)
    These flavours are all Windows Forms only application development environments.
    The limitations are language specific and only windows apps.

    and
    Visual Web Developer Express (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/vwd/)
    Which will give you C#, VB.Net and J# languages but only for web development

    once you have downloaded what you want you will need to register why ?

    you need a registration key to allow the product to continue working past
    30 days - registration will get you one for free
    you get a royalty free image pack with 250 images in it
    you get an icon suite - over 100 icons for no charge
    you get free components, ebooks an articles to help you improve your coding
    skills quickly

    more registration benefits here (http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/register/)

    full credit to Darryl Burlings (windows mobile mvp) blog - which i shamelessly
    swiped the info from

    if your on the end of a dialup connection email me and i can get something
    sorted for the ultra cheap price of a return envelope and blank disk

    my email addy - steven [dot] higgan [the@sign] orcon [dot] net [dot] nz

    ----------------
    the madGeek
    Steven H, Nov 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. Steven H wrote:
    > just a fyi for thoes who are intrested
    >
    > Visual Studio .net 2005 has just been RTM'd and it brings along with it
    > a lot of good tools, however for the rest of us mortals who dont have
    > access to a MSDN Subscription or a healthy bank balance Microsoft have
    > developed a set of development tools (targeted towards casual / hobby
    > developers) called Visual Studio Express Editions.


    One thing that isn't obvious from my two minute look at the Visual C++
    pages or the FAQ is if the resulting binaries are distributable. Is
    there any restrictions on using them for commercial purposes?

    Also, how does the IDE compare with MSVC 6?

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Nov 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Other Guy,

    > ... is if the resulting binaries are distributable ... commercial purposes

    ....

    i cant give you the answer to thoes questions (havent even downloaded them
    yet) however i will ask somebody who should know and get back to you.

    ----------------
    the madGeek

    > Steven H wrote:
    >
    >> just a fyi for thoes who are intrested
    >>
    >> Visual Studio .net 2005 has just been RTM'd and it brings along with
    >> it a lot of good tools, however for the rest of us mortals who dont
    >> have access to a MSDN Subscription or a healthy bank balance
    >> Microsoft have developed a set of development tools (targeted towards
    >> casual / hobby developers) called Visual Studio Express Editions.
    >>

    > One thing that isn't obvious from my two minute look at the Visual C++
    > pages or the FAQ is if the resulting binaries are distributable. Is
    > there any restrictions on using them for commercial purposes?
    >
    > Also, how does the IDE compare with MSVC 6?
    >
    > The Other Guy
    >
    Steven H, Nov 8, 2005
    #3
  4. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Other Guy,

    just an update on your question

    > ... commercial purposes


    according to http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/support/faq/default.aspx#general

    4. Can I use Express Editions for commercial use?
    Yes, there are no licensing restrictions for applications built using the
    Express Editions.

    as for

    > ... is if the resulting binaries are distributable


    what do you mean by distributable, as in compiling to a C++ executable (no
    managed runtime), or distributable as in licencing restrictions ?

    ----------------
    the madGeek

    > Steven H wrote:
    >
    >> just a fyi for thoes who are intrested
    >>
    >> Visual Studio .net 2005 has just been RTM'd and it brings along with
    >> it a lot of good tools, however for the rest of us mortals who dont
    >> have access to a MSDN Subscription or a healthy bank balance
    >> Microsoft have developed a set of development tools (targeted towards
    >> casual / hobby developers) called Visual Studio Express Editions.
    >>

    > One thing that isn't obvious from my two minute look at the Visual C++
    > pages or the FAQ is if the resulting binaries are distributable. Is
    > there any restrictions on using them for commercial purposes?
    >
    > Also, how does the IDE compare with MSVC 6?
    >
    > The Other Guy
    >
    Steven H, Nov 8, 2005
    #4
  5. Steven H wrote:
    > Hello Other Guy,
    >
    > just an update on your question
    >
    >> ... commercial purposes

    >
    > according to
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/support/faq/default.aspx#general
    >
    > 4. Can I use Express Editions for commercial use? Yes, there are no
    > licensing restrictions for applications built using the Express Editions.
    >
    > as for
    >
    >> ... is if the resulting binaries are distributable

    >
    > what do you mean by distributable, as in compiling to a C++ executable
    > (no managed runtime), or distributable as in licencing restrictions ?
    >


    Thanks Steven. I was mainly concerned with licensing restrictions. I'll
    give it a try, but chances are I'll still continue to cross-compile for
    Win32 on FreeBSD.

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Nov 8, 2005
    #5
  6. Steven H

    Bruce Knox Guest

    On Tue, 8 Nov 2005 06:27:48 +0000 (UTC), Steven H
    <> wrote:

    >just a fyi for thoes who are intrested
    >
    >Visual Studio .net 2005 has just been RTM'd and it brings along with it a
    >lot of good tools, however for the rest of us mortals who dont have access
    >to a MSDN Subscription or a healthy bank balance Microsoft have developed
    >a set of development tools (targeted towards casual / hobby developers) called
    >Visual Studio Express Editions.

    ....
    Last time I checked the express version of C++ does not come with MFC
    libraries which is a big restriction.

    Bruce http://www.baggins.co.nz
    http://physio.otago.ac.nz
    Bruce Knox, Nov 9, 2005
    #6
  7. Steven H

    brengarne Guest

    brengarne, Nov 11, 2005
    #7
  8. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Bruce,

    > Last time I checked the express version of C++ does not come with MFC
    > libraries which is a big restriction.


    honestly i think it depends on where you come from, what type of development
    you do to whether it is such a restriction.

    take myself for example, been programming at some level for damn near 10
    years dabbled with assembly, pascal, c++ visual basic, but i choose to use
    c# - not just because its 'new and shiny' but because it is the way windows
    development is going.

    what sort of development do you do ? are you looking after some older software
    written in mfc ?

    ----------------
    the madGeek
    Steven H, Nov 11, 2005
    #8
  9. Steven H wrote:
    > Hello Bruce,
    >
    >> Last time I checked the express version of C++ does not come with MFC
    >> libraries which is a big restriction.

    >
    > honestly i think it depends on where you come from, what type of
    > development you do to whether it is such a restriction.

    ....
    >
    > what sort of development do you do ? are you looking after some older
    > software written in mfc ?


    I still be in the dark ages. I don't see any need for fancy things like
    C++. Still code in C, not likely to change anytime soon.

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Nov 11, 2005
    #9
  10. The Other Guy wrote:
    > I still be in the dark ages.


    No, that isn't old English, I just stuffed up.

    "I must still be in the dark ages".

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Nov 11, 2005
    #10
  11. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Other Guy,

    > I still be in the dark ages. I don't see any need for fancy things
    > like C++. Still code in C, not likely to change anytime soon.


    C++ fancy .... damn. i have been knee deep in it for a while, cant wait till
    i get out

    but it has showen me what gets done 'behind the curtans' in .net - i cant
    quite renember how many times i have crashed my applications because i forgot
    to call 'delete myBigAssObject' during a Draw method (am doing 2nd year games
    programming at otago polytechnic) as managed languages (java, .net) take
    care of it for you.

    what sort of stuff do you do in C

    ----------------
    the madGeek
    Steven H, Nov 11, 2005
    #11
  12. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    Hello brengarne,

    thanks for that link, i will be filing it away

    ----------------
    the madGeek

    > Bruce Knox wrote:
    >
    >> ...
    >> Last time I checked the express version of C++ does not come with MFC
    >> libraries which is a big restriction.

    > Yes, but there is a simple process to download the PSDK and enable
    > those features.
    >
    > http://msdn.microsoft.com/vstudio/express/visualc/usingpsdk/default.as
    > px
    >
    Steven H, Nov 11, 2005
    #12
  13. Steven H wrote:
    > Hello Other Guy,
    >
    >> I still be in the dark ages. I don't see any need for fancy things
    >> like C++. Still code in C, not likely to change anytime soon.

    >
    > C++ fancy .... damn. i have been knee deep in it for a while, cant wait
    > till i get out
    >
    > but it has showen me what gets done 'behind the curtans' in .net - i
    > cant quite renember how many times i have crashed my applications
    > because i forgot to call 'delete myBigAssObject' during a Draw method
    > (am doing 2nd year games programming at otago polytechnic) as managed
    > languages (java, .net) take care of it for you.


    Knowing what is going on and how the data is (or might be) represented
    internally is something that is noticably absent from courses these
    days. There is too much emphasis on building applications that
    businesses might be able to use (assuming standard components are
    efficient and don't have limits), rather than understanding the basics.

    C/C++ is a much better starting point IMO than Java, Visual Basic, and
    ..NET, the three I have seen becoming popular in education over the last
    decade.

    > what sort of stuff do you do in C


    I've mainly done behind-the-scenes code where I don't have to make
    things pretty for users. Lots of socket code, mainly TCP-based
    protocols, and some UDP based like DNS and RADIUS as well. C is well
    suited to these tasks as you can control memory use and performance to a
    much greater degree than with modern systems.

    With the exception of those I have worked on as part of my old job, all
    my own tools are command line based. The main advantage with these fancy
    RAD tools is the ability to throw together a GUI and make it respond.
    Personally I prefer writing procedural code.

    These days I'm no longer in a development role, but I still write plenty
    of code for my own interest.

    The Other Guy
    The Other Guy, Nov 11, 2005
    #13
  14. Steven H

    Bruce Knox Guest

    On Fri, 11 Nov 2005 02:51:25 +0000 (UTC), Steven H
    <> wrote:

    >Hello Bruce,
    >
    >> Last time I checked the express version of C++ does not come with MFC
    >> libraries which is a big restriction.

    >
    >honestly i think it depends on where you come from, what type of development
    >you do to whether it is such a restriction.
    >
    >take myself for example, been programming at some level for damn near 10
    >years dabbled with assembly, pascal, c++ visual basic, but i choose to use
    >c# - not just because its 'new and shiny' but because it is the way windows
    >development is going.
    >
    >what sort of development do you do ? are you looking after some older software
    >written in mfc ?
    >
    >----------------
    >the madGeek
    >

    Hi, I mainly use MFC because it is what I know. One of these days I
    will step into .net but have not yet had incentive enough.

    I mainly program for fun (?? hows that for labeling yourself as a
    geek) but also do a little bit to support research (at Otago uni).
    Look at the baggins website for some of my play things.

    I almost hate to admit I have been programming for just over 30 years.


    Bruce http://www.baggins.co.nz
    http://physio.otago.ac.nz
    Bruce Knox, Nov 11, 2005
    #14
  15. Steven H

    Steven H Guest

    Hello Other Guy,

    > I've mainly done behind-the-scenes code where I don't have to make
    > things pretty for users. Lots of socket code, mainly TCP-based
    > protocols, and some UDP based like DNS and RADIUS as well. C is well
    > suited to these tasks as you can control memory use and performance to
    > a much greater degree than with modern systems.


    speaking about tcp and all that low level stuff...

    i was watching a web-cast yesterday (been doing lots of that since i got
    2mbit internet yahooo) 'Abolade Gbadegesin and team - Networking in Windows
    Vista' (channel9.msdn.com). they were talking about the new TCP stack that
    is going into vista.

    i was compleatly blowen away with what they were talking about - 40% increase
    in data throughput in the vista TCP stack over the old windows (bsd? - may
    or may not resemble much of the old bsd code) TCP stack. it will be intresting
    when its released and some real tests can be done.

    i for one am happy that there are a lot of people choose to code for all
    the low level 'where the bits-hit-the-metal' stuff as that makes my life
    as an application developer much easier.

    ----------------
    the madGeek
    Steven H, Nov 11, 2005
    #15
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