Fuzzy pictures on digital cameras

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Frankhartx, Sep 29, 2003.

  1. Frankhartx

    Frankhartx Guest

    >From: "Tal Lavi"

    >Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    >average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    >will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    >photographed object's, tremblings.


    The same is true with all cameras film or digital--long exposures will not
    tolerate movement of camera or subject--the camera must be on a tripod and the
    subject immobile for the duration of the exposure.>

    The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the resulting
    >image is sharp, but with incorect colors!


    Usually a bit of color imbalance can be corrected with your editing software-no
    big deal I am not familiar with this camera but your settings may not be
    correct for flash--check your manual.
    Frankhartx, Sep 29, 2003
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Frankhartx

    Marli Guest

    You could up the ISO. You are probably on auto ISO and the camera will be
    upping it anyway. If there is not enough light there is not much else you
    can do. Use a flash or use a tripod.




    "Tal Lavi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dear group,
    >
    > I'm a new digital camera user, and I don't know much about the subject.
    >
    > I recently bought my first digital camera, Fuji FinePix 2650, and I have a
    > not-so-small-problem with it.
    >
    > Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    > average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    > will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    > photographed object's, tremblings.
    >
    > The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the

    resulting
    > image is sharp, but with incorect colors!
    >
    > Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still

    keep
    > the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??
    >
    > Mind you, that when shooting and very lit locations, and outside, the
    > pictures are very sharp and colorful, and overall the camera's

    capabilities
    > are more than adequate!
    >
    > As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras,

    but
    > there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why digital
    > camera's became so popular!
    >
    > I'd apreciate a senceire advice,
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Tal
    >
    >
    Marli, Sep 29, 2003
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Frankhartx

    Tal Lavi Guest

    Dear group,

    I'm a new digital camera user, and I don't know much about the subject.

    I recently bought my first digital camera, Fuji FinePix 2650, and I have a
    not-so-small-problem with it.

    Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    photographed object's, tremblings.

    The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the resulting
    image is sharp, but with incorect colors!

    Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still keep
    the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??

    Mind you, that when shooting and very lit locations, and outside, the
    pictures are very sharp and colorful, and overall the camera's capabilities
    are more than adequate!

    As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras, but
    there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why digital
    camera's became so popular!

    I'd apreciate a senceire advice,

    Thanks in advance,

    Tal
    Tal Lavi, Sep 29, 2003
    #3
  4. "Tal Lavi" <> wrote in
    news::

    > As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras,
    > but there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why
    > digital camera's became so popular!


    If you were using a film camera, you'd attempt to overcome this problem by
    using a faster film. This, of course, would result in grainer pictures.

    Many digicams have the ability to increase the ISO setting much like you
    would with film but with the advantage that you can change your ISO setting
    without changing your roll of film.

    Unfortunately for you, the camera you selected does not have this
    capability. It is set to ISO 100 period.

    It's not as bad as it sounds, though, because, if the light level is so low
    that you need to increase the film speed, you'll usually get better
    pictures with a flash anyways - either with film or with digital. I don't
    know why you're getting poor color with your flash.

    --
    To email me, type my 1st name before my last.
    Tony Whitaker, Sep 29, 2003
    #4
  5. Frankhartx

    Steve B Guest

    If your flash pictures have a blue cast (common) and it's not correctable
    with your white balance controls then the answer is to stick a pale
    yellow/tan transparent film over the flash lens to compensate. I've done
    this with my 3 year old Casio QV3000 using transparent inkjet labels with a
    suitable colour printed on it and covered with a clear label for protection
    and now get perfect colours using flash. I see that some digicams and
    ordinary film cameras often have a yellowish colour flash lens as standard.



    "Tal Lavi" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Dear group,
    >
    > I'm a new digital camera user, and I don't know much about the subject.
    >
    > I recently bought my first digital camera, Fuji FinePix 2650, and I have a
    > not-so-small-problem with it.
    >
    > Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    > average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    > will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    > photographed object's, tremblings.
    >
    > The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the

    resulting
    > image is sharp, but with incorect colors!
    >
    > Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still

    keep
    > the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??
    >
    > Mind you, that when shooting and very lit locations, and outside, the
    > pictures are very sharp and colorful, and overall the camera's

    capabilities
    > are more than adequate!
    >
    > As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras,

    but
    > there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why digital
    > camera's became so popular!
    >
    > I'd apreciate a senceire advice,
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Tal
    >
    >
    Steve B, Sep 29, 2003
    #5
  6. Frankhartx

    Cool Hand Guest

    On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 11:49:23 +0200, "Tal Lavi" <> wrote:

    =>Dear group,
    =>
    =>I'm a new digital camera user, and I don't know much about the subject.
    =>
    =>I recently bought my first digital camera, Fuji FinePix 2650, and I have a
    =>not-so-small-problem with it.
    =>
    =>Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    =>average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    =>will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    =>photographed object's, tremblings.
    =>
    =>The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the resulting
    =>image is sharp, but with incorect colors!
    =>
    =>Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still keep
    =>the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??

    Light or reflected aluminum board? Need helper(s).
    Faster Lens -> not cheap
    Tripod -> still longer exposure time.

    =>
    =>Mind you, that when shooting and very lit locations, and outside, the
    =>pictures are very sharp and colorful, and overall the camera's capabilities
    =>are more than adequate!
    =>
    =>As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras, but
    =>there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why digital
    =>camera's became so popular!
    =>
    =>I'd apreciate a senceire advice,
    =>
    =>Thanks in advance,
    =>
    => Tal
    =>

    ---
    We (all things) are made of Atoms.
    http://home.earthlink.net/~rachel1689/
    Cool Hand, Sep 29, 2003
    #6
  7. "Tal Lavi" <> wrote in message news:<>...
    > Dear group,
    >
    > I'm a new digital camera user, and I don't know much about the subject.
    >
    > I recently bought my first digital camera, Fuji FinePix 2650, and I have a
    > not-so-small-problem with it.
    >
    > Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    > average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    > will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    > photographed object's, tremblings.
    >
    > The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the resulting
    > image is sharp, but with incorect colors!
    >
    > Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still keep
    > the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??
    >
    > Mind you, that when shooting and very lit locations, and outside, the
    > pictures are very sharp and colorful, and overall the camera's capabilities
    > are more than adequate!
    >
    > As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras, but
    > there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why digital
    > camera's became so popular!
    >
    > I'd apreciate a senceire advice,
    >
    > Thanks in advance,
    >
    > Tal


    Tal,
    in low light conditions that need longer exposure times a TRIPOD
    is a good investment. That is one thing I've really noticed when using
    a digital camera. Having said that if I go back and look at some old
    film shots that were taken in low light it is possible to see the blur
    on them too.

    Chris.
    Chris McBrien, Sep 29, 2003
    #7
  8. Frankhartx

    Todd Walker Guest

    In article <>, says...
    > Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still keep
    > the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??
    >


    Umm...no. It is against the laws of physics. A certain amount of light
    has to be let into the lens in order for the picture to be exposed
    correctly. The lower the light levels, the longer the shutter has to be
    open, assuming the same aperture setting. There really is no way around
    it.

    --
    ________________________________
    Todd Walker
    http://twalker.d2g.com
    Canon 10D:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/canon10d
    My Digital Photography Weblog:
    http://twalker.d2g.com/dpblog.htm
    _________________________________
    Todd Walker, Sep 30, 2003
    #8
  9. Frankhartx

    Ray Fischer Guest

    Tal Lavi <> wrote:
    >Dear group,
    >
    >I'm a new digital camera user, and I don't know much about the subject.
    >
    >I recently bought my first digital camera, Fuji FinePix 2650, and I have a
    >not-so-small-problem with it.


    Nice little camera. Got one myself a while back.

    >Whenever I try to shoot a picture in light conditions which are below
    >average, a signal apeears on the screen, telling me that the exposure time
    >will be long, and the picutre could get fuzzy, as a result of my, or the
    >photographed object's, tremblings.


    Yup. Low light means the shutter has to stay open longer to gather
    enough light.

    >The situation can be fixed by activating the flash, but then, the resulting
    >image is sharp, but with incorect colors!


    They shouldn't be incorrect. Maybe a little more contrast and a tad
    bluer.

    >Isn't there a way to shoot in unlit locations without flash, but still keep
    >the exposure time short, and the image bright and sharp??


    Nope. Not with that camera. It has no way to adjust the ISO setting
    or the aperture. Use a tripod to hold the camera steady.

    >As I see it, this problem is universal to all home-use digital cameras,


    It is universal to ALL cameras, film or digital, home-use or
    professional. When it gets too dark then the shutter speed gets long.

    > but
    >there must be a way to over-come it! overwise, I can't see why digital
    >camera's became so popular!


    They're popular because you get to see the result right away.

    --
    Ray Fischer
    Ray Fischer, Oct 3, 2003
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. JasonC

    The Fuzzy Bunny has Got the carrot

    JasonC, Feb 15, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    463
    Blinky the Shark
    Feb 16, 2004
  2. zxcvar
    Replies:
    12
    Views:
    890
    (Pete Cresswell)
    Jan 4, 2004
  3. ag

    FUZZY/KINKY HAIR IN DIGITAL SLR PHOTOS

    ag, Jul 4, 2005, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    673
    David J Taylor
    Jul 5, 2005
  4. wagwheel

    Cameras--Cameras--Cameras

    wagwheel, Mar 31, 2007, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    420
    Mark B.
    Apr 1, 2007
  5. wagwheel

    Cameras--Cameras--Cameras

    wagwheel, Apr 1, 2007, in forum: Digital Photography
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    413
    Ken Lucke
    Apr 1, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page