future dula boot of vista and 7

Discussion in 'Windows 64bit' started by Drew, Jun 18, 2009.

  1. Drew

    Drew Guest

    Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on my
    c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle it
    ... Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is once
    it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    appreciated...TIA.......
    Drew, Jun 18, 2009
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Drew

    Drew Guest

    oops ya think that should read dual boot ?

    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on my
    > c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle it
    > .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    > which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    > once it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to
    > change something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me
    > which I would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    > appreciated...TIA.......
    Drew, Jun 18, 2009
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Drew

    Carlos Guest

    Drew,
    Please tell us a little more about your setup.
    How have you partitioned your hard drive?
    Do you have a pre-existent (i.e: Vista, etc.) OS in your PC?
    Are you installing Win 7 booting from a DVD or from "inside" another OS?
    Carlos

    "Drew" wrote:

    > Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on my
    > c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle it
    > .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    > which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is once
    > it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    > something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    > would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    > appreciated...TIA.......
    >
    Carlos, Jun 18, 2009
    #3
  4. Drew

    Drew Guest

    Hey Carlos.. as per your request.. I will give as much detail as you deem
    necessary. running vista business 64 (clean install on new hardware) on a
    Intel core2 quad q6600 4 gigs of ddr800 ram, Sapphire radeon toxic 4850
    graphics card. twin 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is (D:)
    as storage for all my pics, documents ,backups and games I have partitioned
    my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig drive which I gave the
    letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as new volume (J:) and is
    100% free.. I downloaded the rc then used iso buster I believe it was to
    create then burn the image to a dvd. I am now ready I believe to install it
    to J: I don't think I am really ready for the inside another op sys if you
    are talking virtual ware.. If there is anything else you require please let
    me know.. TIA

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Drew,
    > Please tell us a little more about your setup.
    > How have you partitioned your hard drive?
    > Do you have a pre-existent (i.e: Vista, etc.) OS in your PC?
    > Are you installing Win 7 booting from a DVD or from "inside" another OS?
    > Carlos
    >
    > "Drew" wrote:
    >
    >> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on
    >> my
    >> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle
    >> it
    >> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    >> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    >> once
    >> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    >> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    >> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    >> appreciated...TIA.......
    >>
    Drew, Jun 18, 2009
    #4
  5. Drew

    Carlos Guest

    Drew,
    What follows is quite easy.
    If you run the installation DVD from Vista, Win 7 can be installed in drive
    J: and you'll have the dual boot menu when you reboot your computer. During
    the installation process you will have the option of Custom (choose another
    drive) or upgrade (on top of Vista).
    If you run the installation DVD from "outside" Vista, (i.e. you boot your
    computer off the DVD) you will have the same options.
    Where's the catch in this last method? You will be able to install Win 7 in
    J: but Win 7 will see it as "C:" and all your drives will get different
    letters.
    Installing Win 7 from within Vista (first option) has the advantage of
    keeping your drive letters as they are now.
    Carlos

    "Drew" wrote:

    > Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on my
    > c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle it
    > .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    > which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is once
    > it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    > something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    > would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    > appreciated...TIA.......
    >
    Carlos, Jun 18, 2009
    #5
  6. Drew

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Drew.

    Carlos is right on, as usual!

    But we need to clarify some of the concepts and terminology to understand
    better just how this dual-boot idea works.

    > 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is (D:) as storage for all
    > my pics, documents ,backups and games


    Physical disk drives are never assigned "drive" letters. They are numbered,
    starting with zero. In Disk Management's Graphical View, you should see in
    the left-most column that your second drive is "Disk 1", and that it
    contains a single partition. The letter D: applies to that partition
    (volume), not to the physical disk on which it resides.

    > I have partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig
    > drive which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as
    > new volume (J:)


    No. You have partitioned Disk 0 into two partitions, labeled C: and J:. A
    partition (often referred to as a "drive") cannot be subdivided. Except
    that an "extended partition" can be divided into any number of logical
    drives, each of which will be a volume. The extended partition itself does
    not get a number or a letter.

    "Drive" letters are transient. Each OS keeps its own table of drive letters
    in its own Registry and it can't read any other OS's Registry. So Win7
    won't know what Vista's drive letters are, and vice versa. What Vista calls
    J:, Win7 might call C:. This does not confuse either Vista or Win7 - but it
    does confuse many humans.

    "Drive" letters are never assigned to physical drives, anyhow, but to
    partitions and logical drives on those HDDs, so "volume" is a better term
    that is often used. So we should assign each volume a name (label) that
    will get written to the disk and won't change when we switch from Vista to
    Win7. You might want to name your existing Drive C: "Vista" and name your
    new Drive J: "Win7" - and your current Drive D: "Data" - or whatever names
    make sense to you. "Drive" letters and labels also can be assigned to
    optical drives (actually to the partitions on optical drives, but there
    usually is only a single partition on a CD or DVD, so that distinction is
    usually ignored), USB flash drives, cameras and card readers, and even
    network drives. The letters can change often, especially when we boot a
    different OS, but the labels are constant, so those are what we should rely
    on in organizing our disk systems.

    I said that Win7 does not know Vista's drive letter assignments, but there
    is an important exception to this. As Carlos said, if you boot into Vista
    and run Win7's Setup from the Vista desktop, then Setup can see the letters
    in Vista's Registry and use those same letters when installing Win7. After
    installation, of course, Win7's Disk Management can change letter
    assignments except for the System and Boot volumes. So if you want your
    letters to be consistent between Vista and Win7, assign all the letters in
    Vista and then run Win7 Setup from there. If you boot from the Win7 DVD,
    Setup will not know Vista's assignments; it will follow your instructions to
    install Win7 in the first partition on the second HDD (which Vista calls
    J:), make that Win7's boot volume, assign it the letter C:, and then proceed
    to assign D:, E:, etc., to other partitions that it finds. So Win7 will
    most likely assign the letter D: to your System Partition.

    The terms "System Partition" and "Boot Volume" are used "backwards" to most
    users' minds. See KB article 314470 for the counterintuitive definitions:
    Definitions for system volume and boot volume
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470/EN-US/

    Even if you install Win7 in Drive J:, a small but critical part will always
    go into the System Partition - almost always the first partition on Disk 0.
    Vista's Setup.exe has already written Vista's boot sector and startup files
    (bootmgr and the \Boot folder) there; Win7's Setup will amend those to add
    Win7 and create the dual-boot menu. That's why it's important to always
    install the newest OS last; It knows how to deal with an older OS, but the
    older Setup doesn't know anything about the newer OS. Just make sure that
    both HDDs are connected when you run Setup, and that your first HDD is
    designated in the BIOS as your boot device at the time. After the
    installation, the boot process will always start in the System Partition,
    whether you have one OS or a dozen, and then follow instructions it finds
    there to present a menu for you to choose from. Then it will branch to
    whichever volume holds the OS you choose from that menu.

    All this seems to fly in the face of what most users have learned, and it's
    hard to break out of the "Drive C:" mindset that has been drilled into us.
    But I'm currently running Win7 Ultimate x64 RC on Drive X:, the 10th volume
    on my 1 TB second HDD; my System Partition is Drive D:, the first partition
    on my first HDD. I beta test new Windows versions so other OSes are in
    other volumes on the first two HDDs. My data is mostly in Drives E:, H: and
    M: on my RAID 1 mirror on my 3rd and 4th HDDs. Letting go of Drive C: when
    I first started dual-booting about 10 years ago was not easy, but now I'm
    free to assign almost any letter to any volume on any HDD. ;<)

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100

    "Drew" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hey Carlos.. as per your request.. I will give as much detail as you deem
    > necessary. running vista business 64 (clean install on new hardware) on a
    > Intel core2 quad q6600 4 gigs of ddr800 ram, Sapphire radeon toxic 4850
    > graphics card. twin 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is
    > (D:) as storage for all my pics, documents ,backups and games I have
    > partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig drive
    > which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as new
    > volume (J:) and is 100% free.. I downloaded the rc then used iso buster I
    > believe it was to create then burn the image to a dvd. I am now ready I
    > believe to install it to J: I don't think I am really ready for the inside
    > another op sys if you are talking virtual ware.. If there is anything else
    > you require please let me know.. TIA
    >
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Drew,
    >> Please tell us a little more about your setup.
    >> How have you partitioned your hard drive?
    >> Do you have a pre-existent (i.e: Vista, etc.) OS in your PC?
    >> Are you installing Win 7 booting from a DVD or from "inside" another OS?
    >> Carlos
    >>
    >> "Drew" wrote:
    >>
    >>> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on
    >>> my
    >>> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle
    >>> it
    >>> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it
    >>> installed
    >>> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    >>> once
    >>> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    >>> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    >>> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    >>> appreciated...TIA.......
    R. C. White, Jun 18, 2009
    #6
  7. Drew

    Carlos Guest

    R.C.,
    Excellent description!
    My alchemist knowledge on partitions and drives and volumes and etc. has now
    been upgraded to high-school.
    :)
    Carlos

    "R. C. White" wrote:

    > Hi, Drew.
    >
    > Carlos is right on, as usual!
    >
    > But we need to clarify some of the concepts and terminology to understand
    > better just how this dual-boot idea works.
    >
    > > 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is (D:) as storage for all
    > > my pics, documents ,backups and games

    >
    > Physical disk drives are never assigned "drive" letters. They are numbered,
    > starting with zero. In Disk Management's Graphical View, you should see in
    > the left-most column that your second drive is "Disk 1", and that it
    > contains a single partition. The letter D: applies to that partition
    > (volume), not to the physical disk on which it resides.
    >
    > > I have partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig
    > > drive which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as
    > > new volume (J:)

    >
    > No. You have partitioned Disk 0 into two partitions, labeled C: and J:. A
    > partition (often referred to as a "drive") cannot be subdivided. Except
    > that an "extended partition" can be divided into any number of logical
    > drives, each of which will be a volume. The extended partition itself does
    > not get a number or a letter.
    >
    > "Drive" letters are transient. Each OS keeps its own table of drive letters
    > in its own Registry and it can't read any other OS's Registry. So Win7
    > won't know what Vista's drive letters are, and vice versa. What Vista calls
    > J:, Win7 might call C:. This does not confuse either Vista or Win7 - but it
    > does confuse many humans.
    >
    > "Drive" letters are never assigned to physical drives, anyhow, but to
    > partitions and logical drives on those HDDs, so "volume" is a better term
    > that is often used. So we should assign each volume a name (label) that
    > will get written to the disk and won't change when we switch from Vista to
    > Win7. You might want to name your existing Drive C: "Vista" and name your
    > new Drive J: "Win7" - and your current Drive D: "Data" - or whatever names
    > make sense to you. "Drive" letters and labels also can be assigned to
    > optical drives (actually to the partitions on optical drives, but there
    > usually is only a single partition on a CD or DVD, so that distinction is
    > usually ignored), USB flash drives, cameras and card readers, and even
    > network drives. The letters can change often, especially when we boot a
    > different OS, but the labels are constant, so those are what we should rely
    > on in organizing our disk systems.
    >
    > I said that Win7 does not know Vista's drive letter assignments, but there
    > is an important exception to this. As Carlos said, if you boot into Vista
    > and run Win7's Setup from the Vista desktop, then Setup can see the letters
    > in Vista's Registry and use those same letters when installing Win7. After
    > installation, of course, Win7's Disk Management can change letter
    > assignments except for the System and Boot volumes. So if you want your
    > letters to be consistent between Vista and Win7, assign all the letters in
    > Vista and then run Win7 Setup from there. If you boot from the Win7 DVD,
    > Setup will not know Vista's assignments; it will follow your instructions to
    > install Win7 in the first partition on the second HDD (which Vista calls
    > J:), make that Win7's boot volume, assign it the letter C:, and then proceed
    > to assign D:, E:, etc., to other partitions that it finds. So Win7 will
    > most likely assign the letter D: to your System Partition.
    >
    > The terms "System Partition" and "Boot Volume" are used "backwards" to most
    > users' minds. See KB article 314470 for the counterintuitive definitions:
    > Definitions for system volume and boot volume
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470/EN-US/
    >
    > Even if you install Win7 in Drive J:, a small but critical part will always
    > go into the System Partition - almost always the first partition on Disk 0.
    > Vista's Setup.exe has already written Vista's boot sector and startup files
    > (bootmgr and the \Boot folder) there; Win7's Setup will amend those to add
    > Win7 and create the dual-boot menu. That's why it's important to always
    > install the newest OS last; It knows how to deal with an older OS, but the
    > older Setup doesn't know anything about the newer OS. Just make sure that
    > both HDDs are connected when you run Setup, and that your first HDD is
    > designated in the BIOS as your boot device at the time. After the
    > installation, the boot process will always start in the System Partition,
    > whether you have one OS or a dozen, and then follow instructions it finds
    > there to present a menu for you to choose from. Then it will branch to
    > whichever volume holds the OS you choose from that menu.
    >
    > All this seems to fly in the face of what most users have learned, and it's
    > hard to break out of the "Drive C:" mindset that has been drilled into us.
    > But I'm currently running Win7 Ultimate x64 RC on Drive X:, the 10th volume
    > on my 1 TB second HDD; my System Partition is Drive D:, the first partition
    > on my first HDD. I beta test new Windows versions so other OSes are in
    > other volumes on the first two HDDs. My data is mostly in Drives E:, H: and
    > M: on my RAID 1 mirror on my 3rd and 4th HDDs. Letting go of Drive C: when
    > I first started dual-booting about 10 years ago was not easy, but now I'm
    > free to assign almost any letter to any volume on any HDD. ;<)
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100
    >
    > "Drew" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Hey Carlos.. as per your request.. I will give as much detail as you deem
    > > necessary. running vista business 64 (clean install on new hardware) on a
    > > Intel core2 quad q6600 4 gigs of ddr800 ram, Sapphire radeon toxic 4850
    > > graphics card. twin 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is
    > > (D:) as storage for all my pics, documents ,backups and games I have
    > > partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig drive
    > > which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as new
    > > volume (J:) and is 100% free.. I downloaded the rc then used iso buster I
    > > believe it was to create then burn the image to a dvd. I am now ready I
    > > believe to install it to J: I don't think I am really ready for the inside
    > > another op sys if you are talking virtual ware.. If there is anything else
    > > you require please let me know.. TIA
    > >
    > > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > > news:...
    > >> Drew,
    > >> Please tell us a little more about your setup.
    > >> How have you partitioned your hard drive?
    > >> Do you have a pre-existent (i.e: Vista, etc.) OS in your PC?
    > >> Are you installing Win 7 booting from a DVD or from "inside" another OS?
    > >> Carlos
    > >>
    > >> "Drew" wrote:
    > >>
    > >>> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on
    > >>> my
    > >>> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle
    > >>> it
    > >>> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it
    > >>> installed
    > >>> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    > >>> once
    > >>> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    > >>> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    > >>> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    > >>> appreciated...TIA.......

    >
    >
    Carlos, Jun 18, 2009
    #7
  8. Drew

    R. C. White Guest

    Hi, Carlos.

    Gracias!

    RC
    --
    R. C. White, CPA
    San Marcos, TX

    Microsoft Windows MVP
    Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > R.C.,
    > Excellent description!
    > My alchemist knowledge on partitions and drives and volumes and etc. has
    > now
    > been upgraded to high-school.
    > :)
    > Carlos
    >
    > "R. C. White" wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, Drew.
    >>
    >> Carlos is right on, as usual!
    >>
    >> But we need to clarify some of the concepts and terminology to understand
    >> better just how this dual-boot idea works.
    >>
    >> > 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is (D:) as storage for
    >> > all
    >> > my pics, documents ,backups and games

    >>
    >> Physical disk drives are never assigned "drive" letters. They are
    >> numbered,
    >> starting with zero. In Disk Management's Graphical View, you should see
    >> in
    >> the left-most column that your second drive is "Disk 1", and that it
    >> contains a single partition. The letter D: applies to that partition
    >> (volume), not to the physical disk on which it resides.
    >>
    >> > I have partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig
    >> > drive which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed
    >> > as
    >> > new volume (J:)

    >>
    >> No. You have partitioned Disk 0 into two partitions, labeled C: and J:.
    >> A
    >> partition (often referred to as a "drive") cannot be subdivided. Except
    >> that an "extended partition" can be divided into any number of logical
    >> drives, each of which will be a volume. The extended partition itself
    >> does
    >> not get a number or a letter.
    >>
    >> "Drive" letters are transient. Each OS keeps its own table of drive
    >> letters
    >> in its own Registry and it can't read any other OS's Registry. So Win7
    >> won't know what Vista's drive letters are, and vice versa. What Vista
    >> calls
    >> J:, Win7 might call C:. This does not confuse either Vista or Win7 - but
    >> it
    >> does confuse many humans.
    >>
    >> "Drive" letters are never assigned to physical drives, anyhow, but to
    >> partitions and logical drives on those HDDs, so "volume" is a better term
    >> that is often used. So we should assign each volume a name (label) that
    >> will get written to the disk and won't change when we switch from Vista
    >> to
    >> Win7. You might want to name your existing Drive C: "Vista" and name
    >> your
    >> new Drive J: "Win7" - and your current Drive D: "Data" - or whatever
    >> names
    >> make sense to you. "Drive" letters and labels also can be assigned to
    >> optical drives (actually to the partitions on optical drives, but there
    >> usually is only a single partition on a CD or DVD, so that distinction is
    >> usually ignored), USB flash drives, cameras and card readers, and even
    >> network drives. The letters can change often, especially when we boot a
    >> different OS, but the labels are constant, so those are what we should
    >> rely
    >> on in organizing our disk systems.
    >>
    >> I said that Win7 does not know Vista's drive letter assignments, but
    >> there
    >> is an important exception to this. As Carlos said, if you boot into
    >> Vista
    >> and run Win7's Setup from the Vista desktop, then Setup can see the
    >> letters
    >> in Vista's Registry and use those same letters when installing Win7.
    >> After
    >> installation, of course, Win7's Disk Management can change letter
    >> assignments except for the System and Boot volumes. So if you want your
    >> letters to be consistent between Vista and Win7, assign all the letters
    >> in
    >> Vista and then run Win7 Setup from there. If you boot from the Win7 DVD,
    >> Setup will not know Vista's assignments; it will follow your instructions
    >> to
    >> install Win7 in the first partition on the second HDD (which Vista calls
    >> J:), make that Win7's boot volume, assign it the letter C:, and then
    >> proceed
    >> to assign D:, E:, etc., to other partitions that it finds. So Win7 will
    >> most likely assign the letter D: to your System Partition.
    >>
    >> The terms "System Partition" and "Boot Volume" are used "backwards" to
    >> most
    >> users' minds. See KB article 314470 for the counterintuitive
    >> definitions:
    >> Definitions for system volume and boot volume
    >> http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470/EN-US/
    >>
    >> Even if you install Win7 in Drive J:, a small but critical part will
    >> always
    >> go into the System Partition - almost always the first partition on Disk
    >> 0.
    >> Vista's Setup.exe has already written Vista's boot sector and startup
    >> files
    >> (bootmgr and the \Boot folder) there; Win7's Setup will amend those to
    >> add
    >> Win7 and create the dual-boot menu. That's why it's important to always
    >> install the newest OS last; It knows how to deal with an older OS, but
    >> the
    >> older Setup doesn't know anything about the newer OS. Just make sure
    >> that
    >> both HDDs are connected when you run Setup, and that your first HDD is
    >> designated in the BIOS as your boot device at the time. After the
    >> installation, the boot process will always start in the System Partition,
    >> whether you have one OS or a dozen, and then follow instructions it finds
    >> there to present a menu for you to choose from. Then it will branch to
    >> whichever volume holds the OS you choose from that menu.
    >>
    >> All this seems to fly in the face of what most users have learned, and
    >> it's
    >> hard to break out of the "Drive C:" mindset that has been drilled into
    >> us.
    >> But I'm currently running Win7 Ultimate x64 RC on Drive X:, the 10th
    >> volume
    >> on my 1 TB second HDD; my System Partition is Drive D:, the first
    >> partition
    >> on my first HDD. I beta test new Windows versions so other OSes are in
    >> other volumes on the first two HDDs. My data is mostly in Drives E:, H:
    >> and
    >> M: on my RAID 1 mirror on my 3rd and 4th HDDs. Letting go of Drive C:
    >> when
    >> I first started dual-booting about 10 years ago was not easy, but now I'm
    >> free to assign almost any letter to any volume on any HDD. ;<)
    >>
    >> RC
    >>
    >> "Drew" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Hey Carlos.. as per your request.. I will give as much detail as you
    >> > deem
    >> > necessary. running vista business 64 (clean install on new hardware) on
    >> > a
    >> > Intel core2 quad q6600 4 gigs of ddr800 ram, Sapphire radeon toxic 4850
    >> > graphics card. twin 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is
    >> > (D:) as storage for all my pics, documents ,backups and games I have
    >> > partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig drive
    >> > which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as new
    >> > volume (J:) and is 100% free.. I downloaded the rc then used iso buster
    >> > I
    >> > believe it was to create then burn the image to a dvd. I am now ready I
    >> > believe to install it to J: I don't think I am really ready for the
    >> > inside
    >> > another op sys if you are talking virtual ware.. If there is anything
    >> > else
    >> > you require please let me know.. TIA
    >> >
    >> > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> > news:...
    >> >> Drew,
    >> >> Please tell us a little more about your setup.
    >> >> How have you partitioned your hard drive?
    >> >> Do you have a pre-existent (i.e: Vista, etc.) OS in your PC?
    >> >> Are you installing Win 7 booting from a DVD or from "inside" another
    >> >> OS?
    >> >> Carlos
    >> >>
    >> >> "Drew" wrote:
    >> >>
    >> >>> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room
    >> >>> on
    >> >>> my
    >> >>> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to
    >> >>> handle
    >> >>> it
    >> >>> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it
    >> >>> installed
    >> >>> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question
    >> >>> is
    >> >>> once
    >> >>> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to
    >> >>> change
    >> >>> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which
    >> >>> I
    >> >>> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    >> >>> appreciated...TIA.......
    R. C. White, Jun 18, 2009
    #8
  9. Drew

    Drew Guest

    Carlos. as R.C. somehow totally lost me in his explanation of the drive
    "id's", I am going to have to read his post a few times to totally grasp
    what he is saying however what you are saying is while in vista go ahead and
    pop in the installation dvd of win7 and install from there as it will ask me
    where I want it, correct? at that point I can tell it "J:" and go from
    there.
    and when complete it will then give me a option as to what op system I want
    when rebooting. correct? Thanks again for all your help.

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Drew,
    > What follows is quite easy.
    > If you run the installation DVD from Vista, Win 7 can be installed in
    > drive
    > J: and you'll have the dual boot menu when you reboot your computer.
    > During
    > the installation process you will have the option of Custom (choose
    > another
    > drive) or upgrade (on top of Vista).
    > If you run the installation DVD from "outside" Vista, (i.e. you boot your
    > computer off the DVD) you will have the same options.
    > Where's the catch in this last method? You will be able to install Win 7
    > in
    > J: but Win 7 will see it as "C:" and all your drives will get different
    > letters.
    > Installing Win 7 from within Vista (first option) has the advantage of
    > keeping your drive letters as they are now.
    > Carlos
    >
    > "Drew" wrote:
    >
    >> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on
    >> my
    >> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle
    >> it
    >> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    >> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    >> once
    >> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    >> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    >> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    >> appreciated...TIA.......
    >>
    Drew, Jun 19, 2009
    #9
  10. Drew

    Drew Guest

    R.C. I am trying to grasp exactly what you are saying and I am sure I will
    after reading it a few more times.. with disk management open I am looking
    at 2 physical drives. One is Disk 0 (C:) and one is disk 1 (D:) then in the
    same line as disk 0 (C:) there is one called new volume which is J: and that
    is of course where I plan to put win7.. Now that I think about it I remember
    about the disk numbers but one gets so used seeing the letters in everyday
    use and it is hard too break out of that mindset as you said.. Thanks for
    your help and I will save your reply and study it in more detail..

    "R. C. White" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Hi, Drew.
    >
    > Carlos is right on, as usual!
    >
    > But we need to clarify some of the concepts and terminology to understand
    > better just how this dual-boot idea works.
    >
    >> 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is (D:) as storage for
    >> all my pics, documents ,backups and games

    >
    > Physical disk drives are never assigned "drive" letters. They are
    > numbered, starting with zero. In Disk Management's Graphical View, you
    > should see in the left-most column that your second drive is "Disk 1", and
    > that it contains a single partition. The letter D: applies to that
    > partition (volume), not to the physical disk on which it resides.
    >
    >> I have partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig
    >> drive which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as
    >> new volume (J:)

    >
    > No. You have partitioned Disk 0 into two partitions, labeled C: and J:.
    > A partition (often referred to as a "drive") cannot be subdivided. Except
    > that an "extended partition" can be divided into any number of logical
    > drives, each of which will be a volume. The extended partition itself
    > does not get a number or a letter.
    >
    > "Drive" letters are transient. Each OS keeps its own table of drive
    > letters in its own Registry and it can't read any other OS's Registry. So
    > Win7 won't know what Vista's drive letters are, and vice versa. What
    > Vista calls J:, Win7 might call C:. This does not confuse either Vista or
    > Win7 - but it does confuse many humans.
    >
    > "Drive" letters are never assigned to physical drives, anyhow, but to
    > partitions and logical drives on those HDDs, so "volume" is a better term
    > that is often used. So we should assign each volume a name (label) that
    > will get written to the disk and won't change when we switch from Vista to
    > Win7. You might want to name your existing Drive C: "Vista" and name your
    > new Drive J: "Win7" - and your current Drive D: "Data" - or whatever names
    > make sense to you. "Drive" letters and labels also can be assigned to
    > optical drives (actually to the partitions on optical drives, but there
    > usually is only a single partition on a CD or DVD, so that distinction is
    > usually ignored), USB flash drives, cameras and card readers, and even
    > network drives. The letters can change often, especially when we boot a
    > different OS, but the labels are constant, so those are what we should
    > rely on in organizing our disk systems.
    >
    > I said that Win7 does not know Vista's drive letter assignments, but there
    > is an important exception to this. As Carlos said, if you boot into Vista
    > and run Win7's Setup from the Vista desktop, then Setup can see the
    > letters in Vista's Registry and use those same letters when installing
    > Win7. After installation, of course, Win7's Disk Management can change
    > letter assignments except for the System and Boot volumes. So if you want
    > your letters to be consistent between Vista and Win7, assign all the
    > letters in Vista and then run Win7 Setup from there. If you boot from the
    > Win7 DVD, Setup will not know Vista's assignments; it will follow your
    > instructions to install Win7 in the first partition on the second HDD
    > (which Vista calls J:), make that Win7's boot volume, assign it the letter
    > C:, and then proceed to assign D:, E:, etc., to other partitions that it
    > finds. So Win7 will most likely assign the letter D: to your System
    > Partition.
    >
    > The terms "System Partition" and "Boot Volume" are used "backwards" to
    > most users' minds. See KB article 314470 for the counterintuitive
    > definitions:
    > Definitions for system volume and boot volume
    > http://support.microsoft.com/kb/314470/EN-US/
    >
    > Even if you install Win7 in Drive J:, a small but critical part will
    > always go into the System Partition - almost always the first partition on
    > Disk 0. Vista's Setup.exe has already written Vista's boot sector and
    > startup files (bootmgr and the \Boot folder) there; Win7's Setup will
    > amend those to add Win7 and create the dual-boot menu. That's why it's
    > important to always install the newest OS last; It knows how to deal with
    > an older OS, but the older Setup doesn't know anything about the newer OS.
    > Just make sure that both HDDs are connected when you run Setup, and that
    > your first HDD is designated in the BIOS as your boot device at the time.
    > After the installation, the boot process will always start in the System
    > Partition, whether you have one OS or a dozen, and then follow
    > instructions it finds there to present a menu for you to choose from.
    > Then it will branch to whichever volume holds the OS you choose from that
    > menu.
    >
    > All this seems to fly in the face of what most users have learned, and
    > it's hard to break out of the "Drive C:" mindset that has been drilled
    > into us. But I'm currently running Win7 Ultimate x64 RC on Drive X:, the
    > 10th volume on my 1 TB second HDD; my System Partition is Drive D:, the
    > first partition on my first HDD. I beta test new Windows versions so
    > other OSes are in other volumes on the first two HDDs. My data is mostly
    > in Drives E:, H: and M: on my RAID 1 mirror on my 3rd and 4th HDDs.
    > Letting go of Drive C: when I first started dual-booting about 10 years
    > ago was not easy, but now I'm free to assign almost any letter to any
    > volume on any HDD. ;<)
    >
    > RC
    > --
    > R. C. White, CPA
    > San Marcos, TX
    >
    > Microsoft Windows MVP
    > Windows Live Mail 2009 (14.0.8064.0206) in Win7 Ultimate x64 RC 7100
    >
    > "Drew" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Hey Carlos.. as per your request.. I will give as much detail as you deem
    >> necessary. running vista business 64 (clean install on new hardware) on a
    >> Intel core2 quad q6600 4 gigs of ddr800 ram, Sapphire radeon toxic 4850
    >> graphics card. twin 160gig hard drives. I use my second drive which is
    >> (D:) as storage for all my pics, documents ,backups and games I have
    >> partitioned my (C:) drive using disk management creating a 33gig drive
    >> which I gave the letter "J" according to my sidebar it is listed as new
    >> volume (J:) and is 100% free.. I downloaded the rc then used iso buster I
    >> believe it was to create then burn the image to a dvd. I am now ready I
    >> believe to install it to J: I don't think I am really ready for the
    >> inside another op sys if you are talking virtual ware.. If there is
    >> anything else you require please let me know.. TIA
    >>
    >> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >>> Drew,
    >>> Please tell us a little more about your setup.
    >>> How have you partitioned your hard drive?
    >>> Do you have a pre-existent (i.e: Vista, etc.) OS in your PC?
    >>> Are you installing Win 7 booting from a DVD or from "inside" another OS?
    >>> Carlos
    >>>
    >>> "Drew" wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on
    >>>> my
    >>>> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle
    >>>> it
    >>>> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it
    >>>> installed
    >>>> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    >>>> once
    >>>> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    >>>> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    >>>> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    >>>> appreciated...TIA.......

    >
    Drew, Jun 19, 2009
    #10
  11. Drew

    Carlos Guest

    Drew,
    In a nutshell: yes!
    Please use the "Custom" option instead of "Upgrade".
    "Custom" will let you choose the destination volume (in R.C. terms), i.e.,
    your beloved "J:"
    Carlos

    "Drew" wrote:

    > Carlos. as R.C. somehow totally lost me in his explanation of the drive
    > "id's", I am going to have to read his post a few times to totally grasp
    > what he is saying however what you are saying is while in vista go ahead and
    > pop in the installation dvd of win7 and install from there as it will ask me
    > where I want it, correct? at that point I can tell it "J:" and go from
    > there.
    > and when complete it will then give me a option as to what op system I want
    > when rebooting. correct? Thanks again for all your help.
    >
    > "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    > > Drew,
    > > What follows is quite easy.
    > > If you run the installation DVD from Vista, Win 7 can be installed in
    > > drive
    > > J: and you'll have the dual boot menu when you reboot your computer.
    > > During
    > > the installation process you will have the option of Custom (choose
    > > another
    > > drive) or upgrade (on top of Vista).
    > > If you run the installation DVD from "outside" Vista, (i.e. you boot your
    > > computer off the DVD) you will have the same options.
    > > Where's the catch in this last method? You will be able to install Win 7
    > > in
    > > J: but Win 7 will see it as "C:" and all your drives will get different
    > > letters.
    > > Installing Win 7 from within Vista (first option) has the advantage of
    > > keeping your drive letters as they are now.
    > > Carlos
    > >
    > > "Drew" wrote:
    > >
    > >> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room on
    > >> my
    > >> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to handle
    > >> it
    > >> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it installed
    > >> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question is
    > >> once
    > >> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    > >> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which I
    > >> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    > >> appreciated...TIA.......
    > >>
    Carlos, Jun 19, 2009
    #11
  12. Drew

    Drew Guest

    I don't know whether I would call it beloved but with all the different
    drives I have (externals, burners and thumbs) that was the first letter
    available.. Thanks again

    "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Drew,
    > In a nutshell: yes!
    > Please use the "Custom" option instead of "Upgrade".
    > "Custom" will let you choose the destination volume (in R.C. terms), i.e.,
    > your beloved "J:"
    > Carlos
    >
    > "Drew" wrote:
    >
    >> Carlos. as R.C. somehow totally lost me in his explanation of the drive
    >> "id's", I am going to have to read his post a few times to totally grasp
    >> what he is saying however what you are saying is while in vista go ahead
    >> and
    >> pop in the installation dvd of win7 and install from there as it will ask
    >> me
    >> where I want it, correct? at that point I can tell it "J:" and go from
    >> there.
    >> and when complete it will then give me a option as to what op system I
    >> want
    >> when rebooting. correct? Thanks again for all your help.
    >>
    >> "Carlos" <> wrote in message
    >> news:...
    >> > Drew,
    >> > What follows is quite easy.
    >> > If you run the installation DVD from Vista, Win 7 can be installed in
    >> > drive
    >> > J: and you'll have the dual boot menu when you reboot your computer.
    >> > During
    >> > the installation process you will have the option of Custom (choose
    >> > another
    >> > drive) or upgrade (on top of Vista).
    >> > If you run the installation DVD from "outside" Vista, (i.e. you boot
    >> > your
    >> > computer off the DVD) you will have the same options.
    >> > Where's the catch in this last method? You will be able to install Win
    >> > 7
    >> > in
    >> > J: but Win 7 will see it as "C:" and all your drives will get different
    >> > letters.
    >> > Installing Win 7 from within Vista (first option) has the advantage of
    >> > keeping your drive letters as they are now.
    >> > Carlos
    >> >
    >> > "Drew" wrote:
    >> >
    >> >> Ok guys and gals. I just downloaded 7 and I have created enough room
    >> >> on
    >> >> my
    >> >> c: drive or should I say created a new partition large enough to
    >> >> handle
    >> >> it
    >> >> .. Now when I install it the copy should ask me where I want it
    >> >> installed
    >> >> which I will inform it to place it on the new partition. My question
    >> >> is
    >> >> once
    >> >> it is installed on there how does one access it ?? Do I have to change
    >> >> something in the bios or will the computer boot and then ask me which
    >> >> I
    >> >> would like to boot to?? All pertinent answers would be
    >> >> appreciated...TIA.......
    >> >>
    Drew, Jun 19, 2009
    #12
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Silverstrand
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    662
    Silverstrand
    May 26, 2006
  2. Replies:
    2
    Views:
    1,191
  3. crashbang1

    Vista is the future

    crashbang1, Jul 22, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    26
    Views:
    801
    Slacker
    Jul 23, 2007
  4. philo

    Like it or not...Vista is the future

    philo, Sep 15, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    27
    Views:
    844
    Ima Beech
    Sep 24, 2007
  5. lbbss
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    4,751
Loading...

Share This Page