Funny Focus Problem in Nikon D70.....

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by mert, Oct 3, 2004.

  1. mert

    mert Guest

    Started noticing lately my D70's images seemed just slightly out of
    focus, sort of an uninvited "soft focus."

    Was pulling my hair out, trying to find a reason for this....was there
    an autofocus problem? Was my new D70 defective somehow??

    Panic, Panic, etc, lol.


    Then it dawned on me, it is my computer's flat-panel monitor which is
    out-of-focus, not the camera, thank God!!

    Anyone else here experience the same thing??

    Thanks,

    Mert
     
    mert, Oct 3, 2004
    #1
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  2. mert

    Harry Krause Guest

    mert wrote:
    > Started noticing lately my D70's images seemed just slightly out of
    > focus, sort of an uninvited "soft focus."
    >
    > Was pulling my hair out, trying to find a reason for this....was there
    > an autofocus problem? Was my new D70 defective somehow??
    >
    > Panic, Panic, etc, lol.
    >
    >
    > Then it dawned on me, it is my computer's flat-panel monitor which is
    > out-of-focus, not the camera, thank God!!
    >
    > Anyone else here experience the same thing??
    >
    > Thanks,
    >
    > Mert



    No, but it could happen on any monitor.
    For best results with digital photography, good glass-tube monitors
    still are the best.


    --
    We today have a president of the United States who looks like he is the
    son of Howdy Doody or Alfred E. Newman, who isn't smarter than either of
    them, who is arrogant about his ignorance, who is reckless and
    incompetent, and whose backers are turning the United States into a pariah.

    What, me worry?
     
    Harry Krause, Oct 3, 2004
    #2
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  3. mert

    Ken Tough Guest

    Harry Krause <> wrote:

    >mert wrote:
    >> Then it dawned on me, it is my computer's flat-panel monitor which is
    >> out-of-focus, not the camera, thank God!!
    >> Anyone else here experience the same thing??


    >No, but it could happen on any monitor.
    >For best results with digital photography, good glass-tube monitors
    >still are the best.


    Though an LCD is more likely to have user-accessible focus adjustment
    than basic CRTs, isn't it?

    --
    Ken Tough
     
    Ken Tough, Oct 3, 2004
    #3
  4. Harry Krause wrote:
    []
    > No, but it could happen on any monitor.
    > For best results with digital photography, good glass-tube monitors
    > still are the best.


    .... but more likely to drift out of focus!

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 3, 2004
    #4
  5. mert

    Bob Guest

    On 3 Oct 2004 10:12:00 -0700, (mert) wrote:

    >Started noticing lately my D70's images seemed just slightly out of
    >focus, sort of an uninvited "soft focus."
    >
    >Was pulling my hair out, trying to find a reason for this....was there
    >an autofocus problem? Was my new D70 defective somehow??
    >
    >Panic, Panic, etc, lol.
    >
    >
    >Then it dawned on me, it is my computer's flat-panel monitor which is
    >out-of-focus, not the camera, thank God!!
    >
    >Anyone else here experience the same thing??


    Do you mean LCD monitor? You have to run them at maximum size or they blur.



    >Thanks,
    >
    >Mert
     
    Bob, Oct 4, 2004
    #5
  6. Ken Tough wrote:
    []
    > Though an LCD is more likely to have user-accessible focus adjustment
    > than basic CRTs, isn't it?


    I've never seen and LCD/TFT monitor with a focus adjustment - you are
    looking at the pixels directly! If the monitor is part of an EVF system,
    it may have a diopter adjustment, of course.

    If you drive an LCD monitor at anything other than its natural screen
    resolution, it will need to interpolate the pixels, and this may cause
    unsharpness, but this is /not/ lack of focus.

    Cheers,
    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 4, 2004
    #6
  7. mert

    Ken Tough Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:
    >Ken Tough wrote:
    >> Though an LCD is more likely to have user-accessible focus adjustment
    >> than basic CRTs, isn't it?


    >I've never seen and LCD/TFT monitor with a focus adjustment - you are
    >looking at the pixels directly! If the monitor is part of an EVF system,
    >it may have a diopter adjustment, of course.
    >
    >If you drive an LCD monitor at anything other than its natural screen
    >resolution, it will need to interpolate the pixels, and this may cause
    >unsharpness, but this is /not/ lack of focus.


    My NEC MultiSync 1525V has a menu option for horizontal 'fine adjust'
    which appears to affect the sharpness, though I'm driving it at its
    natural screen resolution. Seems it might have something to do with
    clock phase? That's the one I was referring to; obviously it's not
    the same sort of 'focus' as a CRT...

    --
    Ken Tough
     
    Ken Tough, Oct 4, 2004
    #7
  8. mert

    Jer Guest

    Ken Tough wrote:

    > David J Taylor wrote:
    >
    >>Ken Tough wrote:
    >>
    >>>Though an LCD is more likely to have user-accessible focus adjustment
    >>>than basic CRTs, isn't it?

    >
    >
    >>I've never seen and LCD/TFT monitor with a focus adjustment - you are
    >>looking at the pixels directly! If the monitor is part of an EVF system,
    >>it may have a diopter adjustment, of course.
    >>
    >>If you drive an LCD monitor at anything other than its natural screen
    >>resolution, it will need to interpolate the pixels, and this may cause
    >>unsharpness, but this is /not/ lack of focus.

    >
    >
    > My NEC MultiSync 1525V has a menu option for horizontal 'fine adjust'
    > which appears to affect the sharpness, though I'm driving it at its
    > natural screen resolution. Seems it might have something to do with
    > clock phase? That's the one I was referring to; obviously it's not
    > the same sort of 'focus' as a CRT...
    >



    I've never seen a CRT without a focus adjustment, albeit most are under
    the hood. This Sony Multiscan 21sf has been focus tweaked more than
    once over the years.

    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
     
    Jer, Oct 4, 2004
    #8
  9. mert

    Jer Guest

    David J Taylor wrote:

    > Ken Tough wrote:
    > []
    >
    >>Though an LCD is more likely to have user-accessible focus adjustment
    >>than basic CRTs, isn't it?

    >
    >
    > I've never seen and LCD/TFT monitor with a focus adjustment - you are
    > looking at the pixels directly! If the monitor is part of an EVF system,
    > it may have a diopter adjustment, of course.
    >
    > If you drive an LCD monitor at anything other than its natural screen
    > resolution, it will need to interpolate the pixels, and this may cause
    > unsharpness, but this is /not/ lack of focus.
    >
    > Cheers,
    > David
    >
    >



    Another question has come to mind... The diopter adj on the EVF
    viewer... I presume this is an optical variance to view the EVF image
    through? or is it an actual image adjustment of some sort?

    I'm sorry, I'm still learning...

    --
    jer email reply - I am not a 'ten'
     
    Jer, Oct 4, 2004
    #9
  10. Jer wrote:
    []
    > Another question has come to mind... The diopter adj on the EVF
    > viewer... I presume this is an optical variance to view the EVF image
    > through? or is it an actual image adjustment of some sort?
    >
    > I'm sorry, I'm still learning...


    Yes, it allows for eyes where the natural resting focus isn't infinity,
    just like the dipoter adjustment on other pieces of equipment like
    microscopes.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 4, 2004
    #10
  11. Ken Tough wrote:
    []
    > My NEC MultiSync 1525V has a menu option for horizontal 'fine adjust'
    > which appears to affect the sharpness, though I'm driving it at its
    > natural screen resolution. Seems it might have something to do with
    > clock phase? That's the one I was referring to; obviously it's not
    > the same sort of 'focus' as a CRT...


    Yes, if the monitor is driven with an analog signal you need to line up
    the 1024 pixels (say) in the analog signal with the 1024 pixels available
    on the screen. There may need to be both a horizontal frequency
    adjustment (or width) and a phase control (left-right positioning) to get
    a precise match.

    David
     
    David J Taylor, Oct 4, 2004
    #11
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