Fuji S7000: hot shoe and flash voltages

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by The Wop, Sep 19, 2005.

  1. The Wop

    The Wop Guest

    Hi folks.

    I've read that an excessive voltage on the external flash
    hot shoe can wreak havoc on the internal circuitry of a
    digital camera.
    Sync voltages seem to vary quite a lot between flashes. I
    have two flashes. With a voltage tester on I've measured 4V
    on one and 60V on the other!

    Does anyone know what is the maximum voltage my hotshoe
    (Fuji finepix S7000) can safely sustain?

    Google and the Fuji site haven't helped...

    Thanks, The Wop
    The Wop, Sep 19, 2005
    #1
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  2. The Wop

    Guest

    On Mon, 19 Sep 2005 17:40:12 +0200, The Wop <> wrote:

    > I've read that an excessive voltage on the external flash
    > hot shoe can wreak havoc on the internal circuitry of a
    > digital camera.
    > Sync voltages seem to vary quite a lot between flashes. I
    > have two flashes. With a voltage tester on I've measured 4V
    > on one and 60V on the other!
    >
    > Does anyone know what is the maximum voltage my hotshoe
    > (Fuji finepix S7000) can safely sustain?


    Around 15V max.
    , Sep 19, 2005
    #2
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  3. On film cameras the trigger mechanism is a contact switch, ie; mechanical.
    On digital cameras, the trigger mechanism is usually a semiconductor, thus
    the danger of high voltage triggering as the capability of the design can be
    exceeded.
    There is an IEEE standard that defines what cameras should do, but, it seems
    that many of the manufacturers have chosen to ignore the standard, thus the
    danger.
    Generally, there is a suggestion that 12VDC and below should be safe, but,
    best to verify if possible with the actual camera manufacturer.

    Use this as a search term in Google, external flash digital camera trigger
    voltage
    and you will find that a lot of information exists on the net.

    I myself use a photocell trigger on my external flash, so in fact, the
    camera flashes and then the external flash is triggered, this all happens at
    close to the speed of light so it works quite well, and my external flash
    trigger cannot then be damaged.

    rtt


    "The Wop" <> wrote in message
    news:dgmm53$hea$...
    > Hi folks.
    >
    > I've read that an excessive voltage on the external flash
    > hot shoe can wreak havoc on the internal circuitry of a
    > digital camera.
    > Sync voltages seem to vary quite a lot between flashes. I
    > have two flashes. With a voltage tester on I've measured 4V
    > on one and 60V on the other!
    >
    > Does anyone know what is the maximum voltage my hotshoe
    > (Fuji finepix S7000) can safely sustain?
    >
    > Google and the Fuji site haven't helped...
    >
    > Thanks, The Wop
    Richard Tomkins, Sep 19, 2005
    #3
  4. The Wop

    Paul Guest

    Here is a useful site:
    http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html
    according to Fuji the S602 was tolerant of up to 400V! The S7000 is
    almost identical so I imagine this would not be changed.
    I had an S602 and used a Metz 45CT4 for the time I owned the camera with
    no problems (it triggered quite happily through the old Olympus
    dedicated SCA adapter I had from a previous film camera (by the way,
    Metz make adapters for many of their flashes to use them on Digi cams,
    my camera after the S602 was an Olympus C8080, I was very happy to
    doscover I could buy a new SCA adapter to use it TTL with my Olympus).


    The Wop wrote:
    > Hi folks.
    >
    > I've read that an excessive voltage on the external flash hot shoe can
    > wreak havoc on the internal circuitry of a digital camera.
    > Sync voltages seem to vary quite a lot between flashes. I have two
    > flashes. With a voltage tester on I've measured 4V on one and 60V on the
    > other!
    >
    > Does anyone know what is the maximum voltage my hotshoe (Fuji finepix
    > S7000) can safely sustain?
    >
    > Google and the Fuji site haven't helped...
    >
    > Thanks, The Wop
    Paul, Sep 20, 2005
    #4
  5. The Wop

    Paul H. Guest

    "Richard Tomkins" <> wrote in message
    news:432f21ca$...
    > I myself use a photocell trigger on my external flash, so in fact, the
    > camera flashes and then the external flash is triggered, this all happens

    at
    > close to the speed of light so it works quite well, and my external flash
    > trigger cannot then be damaged.


    That's OK if you always want to rely on the S7000's judgement about when (or
    even if) the flash should be fired-- that's kind of limiting for many
    situations.

    Check out the chart here: http://www.botzilla.com/photo/strobeVolts.html

    I decided not to take any chances with my S7000 and bought a Sunpak 383
    (G.N. 130) from B&H. I've used it for about a year and it's still working
    great.
    Paul H., Sep 21, 2005
    #5
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