ftp server question

Discussion in 'Computer Security' started by Peter, Jun 23, 2006.

  1. Peter

    Peter Guest

    i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.

    i get, almost everyday. someone trying to log on to my server as admin,
    administrator. etc. using a dictionary attack.

    i have looked up, with whois were they are from and tried informing their
    isp about the attack.

    most of the time, i get a message from them telling me that they need the
    log with times. also my gmt.
    source ip and port, destination ip and port.

    which i give them all but the source port. (if the wanted to, they could
    look the info up without it.)

    which comes to my question.

    is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip and
    port.
    also the logon name and password would also be nice.

    or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not care about
    hackers.

    i really do not want to put a sniffer on my system and log every packet that
    comes into/out of my system just to not get the message from stupid isp
    people.
    Peter, Jun 23, 2006
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Peter wrote:
    > i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    > [...]
    > is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip
    > and port. also the logon name and password would also be nice.


    FileZilla Server does so.

    > or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not
    > care about hackers.


    True, true.
    Sebastian Gottschalk, Jun 23, 2006
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "Sebastian Gottschalk" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Peter wrote:
    >> i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >> [...]
    >> is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip
    >> and port. also the logon name and password would also be nice.

    >
    > FileZilla Server does so.


    that is why i use filezilla, because it logs name and password.

    >
    >> or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not
    >> care about hackers.

    >
    > True, true.


    for normal attacks that people do. i gave up on infoing isp. was getting the
    same stuff from them.
    so for that. i am using the program from dshield.org
    it takes the info from the firewall/router firewall and send it to them each
    hour. they want that log.
    Peter, Jun 23, 2006
    #3
  4. Peter

    Hadron Quark Guest

    "Peter" <> writes:

    > i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >
    > i get, almost everyday. someone trying to log on to my server as admin,
    > administrator. etc. using a dictionary attack.
    >
    > i have looked up, with whois were they are from and tried informing their
    > isp about the attack.
    >
    > most of the time, i get a message from them telling me that they need the
    > log with times. also my gmt.
    > source ip and port, destination ip and port.
    >
    > which i give them all but the source port. (if the wanted to, they could
    > look the info up without it.)
    >
    > which comes to my question.
    >
    > is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip and
    > port.
    > also the logon name and password would also be nice.


    I thought you already had all that?
    Hadron Quark, Jun 23, 2006
    #4
  5. Peter

    Peter Guest

    "Hadron Quark" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > "Peter" <> writes:
    >
    >> i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >>
    >> i get, almost everyday. someone trying to log on to my server as admin,
    >> administrator. etc. using a dictionary attack.
    >>
    >> i have looked up, with whois were they are from and tried informing their
    >> isp about the attack.
    >>
    >> most of the time, i get a message from them telling me that they need the
    >> log with times. also my gmt.
    >> source ip and port, destination ip and port.
    >>
    >> which i give them all but the source port. (if the wanted to, they could
    >> look the info up without it.)
    >>
    >> which comes to my question.
    >>
    >> is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip and
    >> port.
    >> also the logon name and password would also be nice.

    >
    > I thought you already had all that?


    i have everything but the source port. all others is known.
    so, is there a ftp server, that also gives the source port in the log.
    Peter, Jun 23, 2006
    #5
  6. Peter

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Peter wrote:

    > i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >
    > i get, almost everyday. someone trying to log on to my server as admin,
    > administrator. etc. using a dictionary attack.
    >
    > i have looked up, with whois were they are from and tried informing their
    > isp about the attack.
    >
    > most of the time, i get a message from them telling me that they need the
    > log with times. also my gmt.
    > source ip and port, destination ip and port.
    >
    > which i give them all but the source port. (if the wanted to, they could
    > look the info up without it.)
    >
    > which comes to my question.
    >
    > is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip and
    > port.
    > also the logon name and password would also be nice.
    >
    > or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not care about
    > hackers.
    >
    > i really do not want to put a sniffer on my system and log every packet that
    > comes into/out of my system just to not get the message from stupid isp
    > people.
    >
    >
    >
    >



    My log file became more of a problem than the attempts (which failed
    because there IS NO "administrator" account). The log file just took up
    a lot of space and by the time I could use it to try to report the
    buggers it was useless for anything else!

    And if I report it to China, will they do anything? No. The users are
    in coffee shops and university connections and move along so they are
    impossible to trace.
    Rick Merrill, Jun 23, 2006
    #6
  7. Peter

    nemo_outis Guest

    Sebastian Gottschalk <> wrote in news:4g26t0F1lffn8U2
    @news.dfncis.de:

    > Peter wrote:
    >> i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >> [...]
    >> is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip
    >> and port. also the logon name and password would also be nice.

    >
    > FileZilla Server does so.
    >
    >> or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not
    >> care about hackers.

    >
    > True, true.
    >




    I run Serv-u and it can log everything.

    Regards,
    nemo_outis, Jun 23, 2006
    #7
  8. "Peter" <> wrote:

    > i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >
    > i get, almost everyday. someone trying to log on to my server as
    > admin, administrator. etc. using a dictionary attack.


    Welcome to the Internet. If you thing you have problems, try running an
    SMTP or SSH server. FTP servers are relatively 'low priority" targets
    these days.

    > i have looked up, with whois were they are from and tried informing
    > their isp about the attack.


    You're investing a lot of effort for little or no return. About one in
    a few hundred ISP's will even respond, and of those that do only a tiny
    percentage will be anything but an auto-responder.

    > most of the time, i get a message from them telling me that they need
    > the log with times. also my gmt.
    > source ip and port, destination ip and port.
    >
    > which i give them all but the source port. (if the wanted to, they
    > could look the info up without it.)


    No they couldn't. Source port is the port the "attacker" is connecting
    from. Destination port is the port on your machine they're connecting
    to. If you're going to waste time complaining, please cooperate with
    the few-and-far-between admins that will actually address the problems.
    Or they're quickly become admins who won't. :(

    > which comes to my question.
    >
    > is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip
    > and port.
    > also the logon name and password would also be nice.


    Every competent FTP server does as far as I know, if they're configured
    correctly. I don't know anything about this Filezilla thing though. If
    it doesn't, then the next best thing, hell maybe even the better thing,
    is to have a firewall or IDS standing in the stream logging everything.

    > or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not
    > care about hackers.


    Most ISP's care I'd imagine, but they're so overrun with this sort of
    shit there's not much they can do. Even if they investigate every
    complaint, a good portion will lead to another innocent victim and no
    further.

    If you're running a server of any type you can expect to be probed.
    Most of it's automatic. As long as you're seeing the probes, you're
    probably in good shape. When they suddenly evaporate for no apparent
    reason it's a good indication one of them has succeded, and an attacker
    is erasing your logs or reconfiguring your detection methods. :(

    > i really do not want to put a sniffer on my system and log every
    > packet that comes into/out of my system just to not get the message
    > from stupid isp people.


    Why not? Just having a "sniffer" on your system doesn't mean you have
    to log everything. Set it to watch the open FTP port and ignore the
    rest. A *good* firewall will allow you to do exactly that. Log all
    connection attempts to a specific port, while rejecting established
    connections and activity on other ports.

    You should already be running a firewall. If you're not, you've got a
    death wish. ;) If it doesn't let you adjust your log levels and such
    you need a different firewall.
    Borked Pseudo Mailed, Jun 23, 2006
    #8
  9. Peter

    Peter Guest

    i have put the server serv-u on the system.

    have turned on the option of locking out if several attempt is made to logon
    with x seconds.
    just forget about telling isp about the hackers.


    "nemo_outis" <> wrote in message
    news:Xns97EB6FE78EE10abcxyzcom@127.0.0.1...
    > Sebastian Gottschalk <> wrote in news:4g26t0F1lffn8U2
    > @news.dfncis.de:
    >
    >> Peter wrote:
    >>> i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >>> [...]
    >>> is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip
    >>> and port. also the logon name and password would also be nice.

    >>
    >> FileZilla Server does so.
    >>
    >>> or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not
    >>> care about hackers.

    >>
    >> True, true.
    >>

    >
    >
    >
    > I run Serv-u and it can log everything.
    >
    > Regards,
    >
    >
    Peter, Jun 23, 2006
    #9
  10. Peter

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Borked Pseudo Mailed wrote:
    > "Peter" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>i have a ftp server (filezilla server) on my system.
    >>
    >>i get, almost everyday. someone trying to log on to my server as
    >>admin, administrator. etc. using a dictionary attack.

    >
    >
    > Welcome to the Internet. If you thing you have problems, try running an
    > SMTP or SSH server. FTP servers are relatively 'low priority" targets
    > these days.
    >
    >
    >>i have looked up, with whois were they are from and tried informing
    >>their isp about the attack.

    >
    >
    > You're investing a lot of effort for little or no return. About one in
    > a few hundred ISP's will even respond, and of those that do only a tiny
    > percentage will be anything but an auto-responder.
    >
    >
    >>most of the time, i get a message from them telling me that they need
    >>the log with times. also my gmt.
    >>source ip and port, destination ip and port.
    >>
    >>which i give them all but the source port. (if the wanted to, they
    >>could look the info up without it.)

    >
    >
    > No they couldn't. Source port is the port the "attacker" is connecting
    > from. Destination port is the port on your machine they're connecting
    > to. If you're going to waste time complaining, please cooperate with
    > the few-and-far-between admins that will actually address the problems.
    > Or they're quickly become admins who won't. :(
    >
    >
    >>which comes to my question.
    >>
    >>is there a ftp server that logs source ip and port and destination ip
    >>and port.
    >>also the logon name and password would also be nice.

    >
    >
    > Every competent FTP server does as far as I know, if they're configured
    > correctly. I don't know anything about this Filezilla thing though. If
    > it doesn't, then the next best thing, hell maybe even the better thing,
    > is to have a firewall or IDS standing in the stream logging everything.
    >
    >
    >>or, getting this info is just a wast of time, for most isp do not
    >>care about hackers.

    ....

    Maybe you can tell us HOW these attackers find the IP numbers of systems
    that are running FTP (or others services) ???
    Rick Merrill, Jun 24, 2006
    #10
  11. Peter

    TwistyCreek Guest

    Rick Merrill <> wrote:

    > Maybe you can tell us HOW these attackers find the IP numbers of
    > systems that are running FTP (or others services) ???


    Too easy. Nmap is more than capable of scanning huge chunks of the net
    for specific services and spitting out nicely formatted lists. And I'd
    wager there's specialized software for people who are too script kiddie
    to figure out nmap.

    The standard practice as I understand it is to run your scans and sit
    on the results for a while, or trade them with your buddies. Then some
    time later or from another location launch your "attack" so that it's
    harder to figure out where it's really coming from.

    That innocent looking port scan you see in your firewall today could
    very likely be the precursor to the attack you're going to experience
    next month.
    TwistyCreek, Jun 24, 2006
    #11
  12. Peter

    Rick Merrill Guest

    TwistyCreek wrote:

    > Rick Merrill <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Maybe you can tell us HOW these attackers find the IP numbers of
    >>systems that are running FTP (or others services) ???

    >
    >
    > Too easy. Nmap is more than capable of scanning huge chunks of the net
    > for specific services and spitting out nicely formatted lists. And I'd
    > wager there's specialized software for people who are too script kiddie
    > to figure out nmap.
    >
    > The standard practice as I understand it is to run your scans and sit
    > on the results for a while, or trade them with your buddies. Then some
    > time later or from another location launch your "attack" so that it's
    > harder to figure out where it's really coming from.
    >
    > That innocent looking port scan you see in your firewall today could
    > very likely be the precursor to the attack you're going to experience
    > next month.
    >


    So anyone running an open FTP server has probably already been 'found
    out' but not everyone runs a log and even fewer probably check it!

    THe only account they have tried Does Not Exist!

    Is a VPN the only way to protect against this scanning?
    Rick Merrill, Jun 26, 2006
    #12
  13. Rick Merrill wrote:

    > >>Maybe you can tell us HOW these attackers find the IP numbers of
    > >>systems that are running FTP (or others services) ???

    > >
    > >
    > > Too easy. Nmap is more than capable of scanning huge chunks of the
    > > net for specific services and spitting out nicely formatted lists.
    > > And I'd wager there's specialized software for people who are too
    > > script kiddie to figure out nmap.
    > >
    > > The standard practice as I understand it is to run your scans and
    > > sit on the results for a while, or trade them with your buddies.
    > > Then some time later or from another location launch your "attack"
    > > so that it's harder to figure out where it's really coming from.
    > >
    > > That innocent looking port scan you see in your firewall today could
    > > very likely be the precursor to the attack you're going to
    > > experience next month.
    > >

    >
    > So anyone running an open FTP server has probably already been 'found
    > out' but not everyone runs a log and even fewer probably check it!


    Anyone running any sort of server is likely to be 'found out' in a
    matter of minutes. Hours at the outside. I run SSH, a small web daemon,
    and local delivery only SMTP/IMAP servers here. I have rate limiting on
    the SSH server, so it only gets attacked once every three minutes tops.
    This makes most of the SSH brute force bots go away. The web server gets
    probed for vulnerable CGI all the time even though it's configured to
    flatly disallow CGI. When I opened up the port for the SMTP server it
    took about 45 seconds to see my first attempt to use it as a relay, and
    from that point on I got a pretty steady stream. At least 40 to 50
    tries a day, usually more. I don't run FTP because I have that ability
    via SSH (sFTP), bit I use to and got hoards of failed login attempts
    in those logs too.

    So yeah, if you have something actually responding on a port it's
    "normal" for people to be trying to crack it. Not right mind you, but
    normal. ;)

    99.99% of this stuff is automated script kiddie crap, so a little
    attention to your configuration like not accepting mail for non-local
    delivery and keeping stuff patched/updated is sufficient to keep the
    buggers at bay. Other than that just use good strong passwords when
    applicable, and you should be fine.

    In my humble opinion, if you're not "mentally prepared" for the
    possibility that you will be owned, then it's a good idea not to run
    the services to begin with. Just relax and take care of business, That
    way you won't make as many mistakes. ;)

    > THe only account they have tried Does Not Exist!


    Typical script/automated or dictionary attacks. See them every day. And
    as long as you're actually seeing them you know your firewall/logging
    is working. After a while it's almost reassuring to see the attempts.
    I'd flip out big time if I opened my mail logs and didn't see a whole
    slew of 'REJECT' entries. It would mean the daemon died, or someone
    broke in. The former is better than the latter, but neither one is a
    particularly good thing.

    > Is a VPN the only way to protect against this scanning?


    No, shutting off the services and/or blocking the ports is the only
    way. :)

    A VPN will certainly add a layer of protection and obfuscate the fact
    that services are running, yes. It will also place a burden on your
    "clients" or users. If that's not a problem the it's a great idea to
    just tunnel everything through a VPN. If you need access from anywhere
    or by a varying clientele, then it may be problematic or outright
    impossible.
    Borked Pseudo Mailed, Jun 27, 2006
    #13
  14. Peter

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Borked Pseudo Mailed wrote:

    > Rick Merrill wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>>Maybe you can tell us HOW these attackers find the IP numbers of
    >>>>systems that are running FTP (or others services) ???
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>Too easy. Nmap is more than capable of scanning huge chunks of the
    >>>net for specific services and spitting out nicely formatted lists.
    >>>And I'd wager there's specialized software for people who are too
    >>>script kiddie to figure out nmap.
    >>>
    >>>The standard practice as I understand it is to run your scans and
    >>>sit on the results for a while, or trade them with your buddies.
    >>>Then some time later or from another location launch your "attack"
    >>>so that it's harder to figure out where it's really coming from.
    >>>
    >>>That innocent looking port scan you see in your firewall today could
    >>>very likely be the precursor to the attack you're going to
    >>>experience next month.
    >>>

    >>
    >>So anyone running an open FTP server has probably already been 'found
    >>out' but not everyone runs a log and even fewer probably check it!

    >
    >
    > Anyone running any sort of server is likely to be 'found out' in a
    > matter of minutes. Hours at the outside. I run SSH, a small web daemon,
    > and local delivery only SMTP/IMAP servers here. I have rate limiting on
    > the SSH server, so it only gets attacked once every three minutes tops.
    > This makes most of the SSH brute force bots go away. The web server gets
    > probed for vulnerable CGI all the time even though it's configured to
    > flatly disallow CGI. When I opened up the port for the SMTP server it
    > took about 45 seconds to see my first attempt to use it as a relay, and
    > from that point on I got a pretty steady stream. At least 40 to 50
    > tries a day, usually more. I don't run FTP because I have that ability
    > via SSH (sFTP), bit I use to and got hoards of failed login attempts
    > in those logs too.
    >
    > So yeah, if you have something actually responding on a port it's
    > "normal" for people to be trying to crack it. Not right mind you, but
    > normal. ;)
    >
    > 99.99% of this stuff is automated script kiddie crap, so a little
    > attention to your configuration like not accepting mail for non-local
    > delivery and keeping stuff patched/updated is sufficient to keep the
    > buggers at bay. Other than that just use good strong passwords when
    > applicable, and you should be fine.
    >
    > In my humble opinion, if you're not "mentally prepared" for the
    > possibility that you will be owned, then it's a good idea not to run
    > the services to begin with. Just relax and take care of business, That
    > way you won't make as many mistakes. ;)
    >
    >
    >>THe only account they have tried Does Not Exist!

    >
    >
    > Typical script/automated or dictionary attacks. See them every day. And
    > as long as you're actually seeing them you know your firewall/logging
    > is working. After a while it's almost reassuring to see the attempts.
    > I'd flip out big time if I opened my mail logs and didn't see a whole
    > slew of 'REJECT' entries. It would mean the daemon died, or someone
    > broke in. The former is better than the latter, but neither one is a
    > particularly good thing.
    >
    >
    >>Is a VPN the only way to protect against this scanning?

    >
    >
    > No, shutting off the services and/or blocking the ports is the only
    > way. :)
    >
    > A VPN will certainly add a layer of protection and obfuscate the fact
    > that services are running, yes. It will also place a burden on your
    > "clients" or users. If that's not a problem the it's a great idea to
    > just tunnel everything through a VPN. If you need access from anywhere
    > or by a varying clientele, then it may be problematic or outright
    > impossible.
    >


    "rate limiting" - upload speed from FTP server is limited to 43KB, but
    it doesn't slow the door-knob twisters. What is the SSH rate limiting?

    All users can be id'd by IP address easily and in advance. Therefore
    What VPN is the easiest to install (on both ends)?
    Rick Merrill, Jun 29, 2006
    #14
  15. Rick Merrill wrote:

    > > daemon, and local delivery only SMTP/IMAP servers here. I have rate
    > > limiting on the SSH server, so it only gets attacked once every
    > > three minutes tops. This makes most of the SSH brute force bots go


    <snip>
    > "rate limiting" - upload speed from FTP server is limited to 43KB,
    > but it doesn't slow the door-knob twisters. What is the SSH rate
    > limiting?


    OK that was way misleading. My fault. :) What I was trying to say was
    that my firewall monitors new connections, and if too many attempts are
    made to establish a new connection to my SSH server within a certain
    period of time, access to the SSH server is shut off for a while.

    When someone tries this dictionary attack crap they're doing nothing
    but trying to establish one connection after another. If the password
    is wrong, the connection is never fully established. Many/most
    firewalls are able to tell the difference between established, and new.
    It's called being "stateful". Knowing about the "state" of a
    connection.

    So "rate limiting" was a little misleading, especially since you're in
    that frame of mind (rightfully so) where it means constraining
    throughput. But in effect, what I do at the firewall is "rate limit"
    the number of failed connection attempts to 3 in any 60 second period
    of time, with a 10 minute "break" in between. Or something like that,
    it's been so long since I set it up I could be off on the exact
    timing. ;)

    > All users can be id'd by IP address easily and in advance. Therefore
    > What VPN is the easiest to install (on both ends)?
    >


    Well, I'm not a Windows guy so I might not be the best person to answer
    this. But As I understand it WinXP has it's own "built it" VPN client.
    It would of course talk to the Windows "server" version, although I
    don't know what you need for that. Have no clue if XP will serve
    connections this way or not. But it would certainly be the easiest as
    far as clients are concerned, assuming the standard distribution of
    Windows boxen. ;)

    If it were me, the answer would be easy. OpenVPN. This might be a
    solution for you too, as I said, I have no clue what Windows will do as
    far as VPN goes. Sorry. :(
    Borked Pseudo Mailed, Jun 29, 2006
    #15
  16. Peter

    Rick Merrill Guest

    Borked Pseudo Mailed wrote:

    > Rick Merrill wrote:
    >
    >
    >>>daemon, and local delivery only SMTP/IMAP servers here. I have rate
    >>>limiting on the SSH server, so it only gets attacked once every
    >>>three minutes tops. This makes most of the SSH brute force bots go

    >
    >
    > <snip>
    >
    >>"rate limiting" - upload speed from FTP server is limited to 43KB,
    >>but it doesn't slow the door-knob twisters. What is the SSH rate
    >>limiting?

    >
    >
    > OK that was way misleading. My fault. :) What I was trying to say was
    > that my firewall monitors new connections, and if too many attempts are
    > made to establish a new connection to my SSH server within a certain
    > period of time, access to the SSH server is shut off for a while.
    >
    > When someone tries this dictionary attack crap they're doing nothing
    > but trying to establish one connection after another. If the password
    > is wrong, the connection is never fully established. Many/most
    > firewalls are able to tell the difference between established, and new.
    > It's called being "stateful". Knowing about the "state" of a
    > connection.
    >
    > So "rate limiting" was a little misleading, especially since you're in
    > that frame of mind (rightfully so) where it means constraining
    > throughput. But in effect, what I do at the firewall is "rate limit"
    > the number of failed connection attempts to 3 in any 60 second period
    > of time, with a 10 minute "break" in between. Or something like that,
    > it's been so long since I set it up I could be off on the exact
    > timing. ;)
    >
    >
    >>All users can be id'd by IP address easily and in advance. Therefore
    >>What VPN is the easiest to install (on both ends)?
    >>

    >
    >
    > Well, I'm not a Windows guy so I might not be the best person to answer
    > this. But As I understand it WinXP has it's own "built it" VPN client.
    > It would of course talk to the Windows "server" version, although I
    > don't know what you need for that. Have no clue if XP will serve
    > connections this way or not. But it would certainly be the easiest as
    > far as clients are concerned, assuming the standard distribution of
    > Windows boxen. ;)
    >
    > If it were me, the answer would be easy. OpenVPN. This might be a
    > solution for you too, as I said, I have no clue what Windows will do as
    > far as VPN goes. Sorry. :(
    >


    what you describe may be EXACTLY what I want: a transparent firewall
    that detects successive login attempts then prohibits access for,say,
    10 minutes. One thing tho: what I need is a passthrough :
    strangers<-->Cable<==>modem<==>router<==>firewall<==>server<-->legit users
    Rick Merrill, Jul 2, 2006
    #16
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. CrackHeadBob

    Bulletproof FTP Server: Speed question

    CrackHeadBob, Feb 11, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    4,254
  2. Frosty

    ftp://ftp.isc.org

    Frosty, Nov 22, 2006, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    973
  3. Mike Easter

    Why can't I access ftp://ftp.isc.org/ ?

    Mike Easter, Mar 14, 2007, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    10
    Views:
    792
    Vanguard
    Mar 15, 2007
  4. Replies:
    1
    Views:
    412
    Lutz Donnerhacke
    Sep 13, 2007
  5. inventor1984
    Replies:
    4
    Views:
    1,546
    Dave \Crash\ Dummy
    Dec 21, 2009
Loading...

Share This Page