FSM Diagrams

Discussion in 'Computer Support' started by df@cf.com, Jan 21, 2007.

  1. Guest

    Hi,

    Im trying to understand how Finate State Machine diagrams work, I
    cant really find alot of info on them.

    The one im looking at is here:
    http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/9118/clipboard025ds.jpg

    I understand that S4 is the 'accepting state' and that S0 is the
    'entry state', but I cannot understand what a and b are and what the
    purpose of states S2 and S3 are, and more to the point what the FSM
    actually does.

    Thanks very much for any help,

    Jack


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    , Jan 21, 2007
    #1
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  2. 1932 Guest

    "JackC" <> wrote in message
    news:45b390f5$0$23357$...
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im trying to understand how Finate State Machine diagrams work, I
    > cant really find alot of info on them.
    >
    > The one im looking at is here:
    > http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/9118/clipboard025ds.jpg
    >
    > I understand that S4 is the 'accepting state' and that S0 is the
    > 'entry state', but I cannot understand what a and b are and what the
    > purpose of states S2 and S3 are, and more to the point what the FSM
    > actually does.
    >

    Some info here J.
    http://asicguide.com/verilog/fsm.html

    Or you can go to www.google.com , and type in..
    Finite State Machine diagrams
    ^
    ^ ...i not a.
     
    1932, Jan 21, 2007
    #2
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  3. why? Guest

    On 21 Jan 2007 16:12:37 GMT, JackC () wrote:

    >Hi,
    >
    >Im trying to understand how Finate State Machine diagrams work, I
    >cant really find alot of info on them.


    Should be in lots on university computing course notes found online,
    www.google.com a bit.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Finite_state_machine

    http://cslu.cse.ogi.edu/HLTsurvey/ch11node8.html

    I guess the very simple view, is it's how information changes , what
    triggers the change and resulting actions.

    >The one im looking at is here:
    >http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/9118/clipboard025ds.jpg
    >

    <snip>

    Me
     
    why?, Jan 21, 2007
    #3
  4. Blinky the Shark, Jan 21, 2007
    #4
  5. Guest

    a and b are your inputs. (Think of your finite state machine
    as a vending machine with a single coin slot that accepts
    nickels and dimes, one coin at a time. A mechanical sensor
    indicates to the control whether a dime or nickel has been
    inserted into the coin slot. If a nickel has been inserted
    we get an a, if a dime then a b.)

    Your vending machine can only go to S4 if you insert your
    coins in the exact sequence a, b, a. Any other possible
    input sequence will send you right back to the start. That
    is, if you try the sequence a, a, you take the arrow back to
    S0; if you try the sequence a, b, b you take the arrow back.
    The only allowed sequence is a, b, a. (Reading that
    back I sound like the holy handgrenade of Antioch.)

    The states remember what you have already done:
    * S1 remembers that you have inserted a
    * S3 remembers that you have inserted a, b
    * S4 remembers that you inserted the sequence a, b, a.

    wrote:
    > Hi,
    >
    > Im trying to understand how Finate State Machine diagrams work, I
    > cant really find alot of info on them.
    >
    > The one im looking at is here:
    > http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/9118/clipboard025ds.jpg
    >
    > I understand that S4 is the 'accepting state' and that S0 is the
    > 'entry state', but I cannot understand what a and b are and what the
    > purpose of states S2 and S3 are, and more to the point what the FSM
    > actually does.
    >
    > Thanks very much for any help,
    >
    > Jack
     
    , Jan 22, 2007
    #5
  6. Anonymous Guest

    a and b are your inputs. (Think of your finite state machine
    as a vending machine with a single coin slot that accepts
    nickels and dimes, one coin at a time. A mechanical sensor
    indicates to the control whether a dime or nickel has been
    inserted into the coin slot. If a nickel has been inserted
    we get an a, if a dime then a b.)

    Your vending machine can only go to S4 if you insert your
    coins in the exact sequence a, b, a. Any other possible
    input sequence will send you right back to the start. That
    is, if you try the sequence a, a, you take the arrow back to
    S0; if you try the sequence a, b, b you take the arrow back.
    The only allowed sequence is a, b, a. (****! reading that
    back I sound like the holy handgrenade of Antioch.)

    The states remember what you have already done:
    * S1 remembers that you have inserted a
    * S3 remembers that you have inserted a, b
    * S4 remembers that you inserted the sequence a, b, a.

    JackC () writes:

    > Hi,
    >
    > Im trying to understand how Finate State Machine diagrams work, I
    > cant really find alot of info on them.
    >
    > The one im looking at is here:
    > http://img261.imageshack.us/img261/9118/clipboard025ds.jpg
    >
    > I understand that S4 is the 'accepting state' and that S0 is the
    > 'entry state', but I cannot understand what a and b are and what the
    > purpose of states S2 and S3 are, and more to the point what the FSM
    > actually does.
    >
    > Thanks very much for any help,
    >
    > Jack


    --
    Then did he raise on high the Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch,
    saying, "Bless this, O Lord, that with it thou mayst blow
    thine enemies to tiny bits, in thy mercy." And the people
    did rejoice and did feast upon the lambs and toads and tree-
    sloths and fruit-bats and orangutans and breakfast cereals
    ... Now did the Lord say, "First thou pullest the Holy Pin.
    Then thou must count to three. Three shall be the number of
    the counting and the number of the counting shall be three.
    Four shalt thou not count, neither shalt thou count two,
    excepting that thou then proceedeth to three. Five is right
    out. Once the number three, being the number of the
    counting, be reached, then lobbest thou the Holy Hand
    Grenade in the direction of thine foe, who, being naughty in
    my sight, shall snuff it."



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    Anonymous, Jan 23, 2007
    #6
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