FSB Speeds - Effective vs Real

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Rupert, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. Rupert

    Rupert Guest

    I just emptied my change jar and managed to have enough to splash out on a
    AMD 2500+ processor and another 512MB RAM for my PC - runs like a dream now
    :)

    It took a while to work out what to set the FSB speed in the motherboard to,
    ending up after resetting the bios a few times that it needed to be 166Mhz,
    which was a bit confusing as all the literature tells me it's run at a
    333Mhz FSB - had to resort to the motherboard manual in the end (shock
    horror) to set me right!


    Looking at the results back from Aida it shows me the following...

    Motherboard Name MSI KT4V (MS-6712)

    Front Side Bus Properties
    Bus Type DEC Alpha EV6
    Bus Width 64-bit
    Real Clock 167 MHz (DDR)
    Effective Clock 333 MHz
    Bandwidth 2666 MB/s

    What is the difference between effective and real FSB speeds?

    Cheers
    Rupert
    Rupert, Feb 24, 2004
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. Rupert wrote:
    > Real Clock 167 MHz (DDR)
    > Effective Clock 333 MHz
    > What is the difference between effective and real FSB speeds?


    Marketing...
    The real FSB is 166.666etcetc but it transfers data at both the rising
    and falling edge of the clock(DDR = Double Data Rate), so in effect,
    doubles the bus speed to 333(2 x 166.6).

    On paper it looks better to have bigger numbers, so they have a "333MHz
    bus" rather than a *slow* "166MHz bus".

    --
    Dave Hall
    http://Dave.net.nz
    We have Hangman, Pacman, and Space Invaders
    T.N.O. - Dave.net.nz, Feb 24, 2004
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Rupert

    Rupert Guest

    thanks Dave, thats makes alot of sense - should have realised that 333/2 was
    166(ish)
    "T.N.O. - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote in message
    news:c1eh60$1gslpo$-berlin.de...
    > Rupert wrote:
    > > Real Clock 167 MHz (DDR)
    > > Effective Clock 333 MHz
    > > What is the difference between effective and real FSB speeds?

    >
    > Marketing...
    > The real FSB is 166.666etcetc but it transfers data at both the rising
    > and falling edge of the clock(DDR = Double Data Rate), so in effect,
    > doubles the bus speed to 333(2 x 166.6).
    >
    > On paper it looks better to have bigger numbers, so they have a "333MHz
    > bus" rather than a *slow* "166MHz bus".
    >
    > --
    > Dave Hall
    > http://Dave.net.nz
    > We have Hangman, Pacman, and Space Invaders
    >
    Rupert, Feb 24, 2004
    #3
  4. Rupert

    cowboyz Guest

    "T.N.O. - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote in message
    news:c1eh60$1gslpo$-berlin.de...
    > Rupert wrote:
    > > Real Clock 167 MHz (DDR)
    > > Effective Clock 333 MHz
    > > What is the difference between effective and real FSB speeds?

    >
    > Marketing...
    > The real FSB is 166.666etcetc but it transfers data at both the rising
    > and falling edge of the clock(DDR = Double Data Rate), so in effect,
    > doubles the bus speed to 333(2 x 166.6).
    >
    > On paper it looks better to have bigger numbers, so they have a "333MHz
    > bus" rather than a *slow* "166MHz bus".
    >
    > --
    > Dave Hall
    > http://Dave.net.nz
    > We have Hangman, Pacman, and Space Invaders
    >


    It is a part of marketing but also necessary because you have the P3 running
    at 133 and the P4 running at 100 and the new P4 running at 133 but
    *effectively* the P3 runs at 133 and the P4 (old) runs at 400 (quad pumped)
    and the new P4 running at 533 (quad pumped) and the newer new P4 running at
    800 (200 quad pumped)

    You see it can get terribly confusing very quickly. The effeective clock
    speed is not a marketing *ploy* as such but a real advantage. It is simply
    easier to refer to chips at effective speeds rather than real speeds.
    cowboyz, Feb 24, 2004
    #4
  5. Rupert wrote:
    > thanks Dave, thats makes alot of sense - should have realised that 333/2 was
    > 166(ish)


    Im not claiming to be perfectly correct, but yeah, thats the general
    idea of it anyway.

    The P4 uses a QDR FSB... it is actually only running at 200MHz not 800 too.

    --
    Http://www.Dave.net.nz
    Play Hangman
    Register, and play Space Invaders or Pacman.
    T.N.O. - Dave.net.nz, Feb 24, 2004
    #5
  6. Rupert

    pete Guest

    On Tue, 24 Feb 2004 18:02:41 +1300, cowboyz wrote:

    > "T.N.O. - Dave.net.nz" <> wrote in message
    > news:c1eh60$1gslpo$-berlin.de...
    >> Rupert wrote:
    >>> Real Clock 167 MHz (DDR)
    >>> Effective Clock 333 MHz
    >>> What is the difference between effective and real FSB speeds?

    >>
    >> Marketing...
    >> The real FSB is 166.666etcetc but it transfers data at both the rising
    >> and falling edge of the clock(DDR = Double Data Rate), so in effect,
    >> doubles the bus speed to 333(2 x 166.6).
    >>
    >> On paper it looks better to have bigger numbers, so they have a "333MHz
    >> bus" rather than a *slow* "166MHz bus".
    >>
    >> --
    >> Dave Hall
    >> http://Dave.net.nz
    >> We have Hangman, Pacman, and Space Invaders
    >>

    >
    > It is a part of marketing but also necessary because you have the P3 running
    > at 133 and the P4 running at 100 and the new P4 running at 133 but
    > *effectively* the P3 runs at 133 and the P4 (old) runs at 400 (quad pumped)
    > and the new P4 running at 533 (quad pumped) and the newer new P4 running at
    > 800 (200 quad pumped)
    >
    > You see it can get terribly confusing very quickly. The effeective clock
    > speed is not a marketing *ploy* as such but a real advantage. It is simply
    > easier to refer to chips at effective speeds rather than real speeds.


    Is that a bit like the old 486 DX4 100 were really 3 x 33 mhz bus speed,
    but DX4 looked better than DX3 (intel again)
    pete, Feb 24, 2004
    #6
  7. Rupert

    Species Guest

    Rupert wrote:

    > I just emptied my change jar and managed to have enough to splash out on a
    > AMD 2500+ processor and another 512MB RAM for my PC - runs like a dream now
    > :)


    The first thing I'd do would be to overclock it to 2.26GHz if the ram is fast
    enough :)
    Species, Feb 24, 2004
    #7
  8. Rupert

    Rupert Guest

    Yeah maybe - but do I need to replace the heat sink/fan with another one?

    "Species" <> wrote in message news:...
    > Rupert wrote:
    >
    > > I just emptied my change jar and managed to have enough to splash out on

    a
    > > AMD 2500+ processor and another 512MB RAM for my PC - runs like a dream

    now
    > > :)

    >
    > The first thing I'd do would be to overclock it to 2.26GHz if the ram is

    fast
    > enough :)
    >
    Rupert, Feb 24, 2004
    #8
  9. Rupert

    ~misfit~ Guest

    Rupert wrote:
    > Yeah maybe - but do I need to replace the heat sink/fan with another
    > one?


    I've overclocked every one (XP2500+ Barton) I've ever set up (four of them)
    to 200MHz FSB (2.2GHz, XP3200+ spec), using the standard AMD HSF and just a
    little vcore increase (varies fron CPU to CPU) and they've all been fine.
    All of them had at least one case fan and the one that required the largest
    vcore increase runs at 60°C under *full* load (28°C ambient temp) and runs
    most tasks in the high 40s. The increase is certainly noticable, especially
    in apps that benefit from the higher memory throughput. I certainly hope you
    have an nForce2 Ultra 400 chipset mobo, anything else is certainly
    second-best for AMDs IME.

    I suggest you first download and install Prime95 to test for stability.
    Sometimes, when overclocked, it will boot into windows fine but, IMO, unless
    it will run Prime95 error-free for at least a few hours, it isn't stable and
    a vcore increase will usually (always for me) fix that. If a small vcore
    increase doesn't fix it run memtest86+ ver 1.11 from floppy for a while just
    to be sure it isn't your RAM giving errors as Prime95 tests the CPU/RAM. If
    memtest is fine try a little more vcore. Keep your eye on core temps but you
    should be fine.

    I also suggest you install MBM5 (motherboard monitor 5) to keep an eye on
    your temps.

    (This post probably won't show up for a while as our phone is out, Telecom
    tells me they're 'doing maintenance' in this area and our phone line will be
    better than ever afterwards, it was fine but... <shrug>. They say it should
    be back on-line by 7pm, this was at 10am)

    If temps in the 60s result and you aren't happy with that (although it
    should be fine) I've found that, rather than spend $$$$ on an after-market
    HSF that may shave 2-6° off your temp it's better to have an 80mm hole cut
    in the side of your case, centered directly above your CPU. Mount an 80mm
    case fan there and use a section of plastic cup or similar (with the right
    taper, I used a Pak'n'Save container from the fish bar on my XP1800+ at 10.5
    x 200MHz, 2.1GHz, standard XP1800+ HSF) hot-glued to the case fan, with a
    few mm clearance to the HSF. This will provide a forced supply of
    outside-case (cooler) air directly to your CPU and, with me, resulted in an
    11°C drop measured on the CPU diode. It cost me about $15 to do. A mate
    spent over $100 on a fancy all-copper HS, an 80mm fan and one of those fancy
    bent Thermaltake adapters that's supposed to do away with the dead-spot
    created by a radial fan for his (I let him use some of my Artic Silver 3,
    $25 a tube) and he only got a 4° drop. He wouldn't listen to me. I offered
    him an 80mm chromed wire finger gaurd and told him he could use an LED fan
    (he's big on looks/brand names and reckons the hole in his fancy case would
    'ruin' it's looks).

    If you need any advice feel free to ask me here, I overclock everything in
    sight and haven't had a problem I couldn't overcome yet. Got a Celeron 600
    running at 900MHz here, has been for years. Turned a dog of a machine into
    something quite useful.

    Good luck. (Not that you'll need it).
    --
    ~misfit~

    > "Species" <> wrote in message
    > news:...
    >> Rupert wrote:
    >>
    >>> I just emptied my change jar and managed to have enough to splash
    >>> out on a AMD 2500+ processor and another 512MB RAM for my PC - runs
    >>> like a dream now :)

    >>
    >> The first thing I'd do would be to overclock it to 2.26GHz if the
    >> ram is fast enough :)
    ~misfit~, Feb 24, 2004
    #9
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. ted

    FSB settings

    ted, Aug 13, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    742
    Monsignor Larville Jones MD
    Aug 18, 2003
  2. Tuzzy@@

    Quick FSB 800 and Mobo Questions

    Tuzzy@@, Aug 27, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    457
    Tuzzy@@
    Aug 27, 2003
  3. Xeno Chauvin

    Core speeds and memory speeds???

    Xeno Chauvin, Oct 3, 2003, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    481
    °Mike°
    Oct 3, 2003
  4. BIG NIGE

    XP3000+Bar 400 FSB V XP3000+Bar 333 FSB

    BIG NIGE, Sep 29, 2004, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    458
  5. =?Utf-8?B?TkpU?=

    Internet Sharing: Equal upload speeds but un-equal download speeds

    =?Utf-8?B?TkpU?=, Sep 14, 2007, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    984
    =?Utf-8?B?TkpU?=
    Sep 15, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page