Fried a Power Supply

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by Mark, Oct 16, 2003.

  1. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Anyone ever have this happen?

    I hooked up a system of a co-worker's to check over a few windows errors.
    Turning on the system gave me quite an impressive display of fireworks from
    the power supply. Opening up the PSU confirmed my suspisions, it was fried.
    I was also greeted by an army of dust bunnies inside the case ans PSU.

    Now I sure feel the part of the fool since I now have to notify the next of
    kin....

    Anyone have this happen an if so was there any collateral damage to the
    other components?
     
    Mark, Oct 16, 2003
    #1
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  2. Mark

    Thor Guest

    I'm sure this has happened to just about every tech with a decent amount of
    time in the business. It's happened to me a couple of times at least. You
    just explain it to the customer, and give them their repair options. It's
    not your fault. As for collateral damage, it just depends on the nature of
    the failure. Sometimes there is, and sometimes there isn't.


    ...
    "Mark" <> wrote in message
    news:GdFjb.9886$...
    > Anyone ever have this happen?
    >
    > I hooked up a system of a co-worker's to check over a few windows errors.
    > Turning on the system gave me quite an impressive display of fireworks

    from
    > the power supply. Opening up the PSU confirmed my suspisions, it was

    fried.
    > I was also greeted by an army of dust bunnies inside the case ans PSU.
    >
    > Now I sure feel the part of the fool since I now have to notify the next

    of
    > kin....
    >
    > Anyone have this happen an if so was there any collateral damage to the
    > other components?
    >
    >
     
    Thor, Oct 17, 2003
    #2
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  3. Mark

    Firebird81 Guest

    Oh yes, it's happened to me too. The sparks don't bother me. Its the smoke
    that's scary! Especially if the client is sitting right there when it
    happens!
     
    Firebird81, Oct 17, 2003
    #3
  4. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Talk about a freak accident. Funny how this never happens to my equipment
    :)
    The PSU was just some generic brand that came with the case.

    Thanks for the input guys.
    "Firebird81" <> wrote in message
    news:mWIjb.1576$...
    > Oh yes, it's happened to me too. The sparks don't bother me. Its the smoke
    > that's scary! Especially if the client is sitting right there when it
    > happens!
    >
    >
     
    Mark, Oct 17, 2003
    #4
  5. Mark

    Larry Smith Guest

    > I'm sure this has happened to just about every tech with a decent amount
    of
    > time in the business.


    I program for a living (20+ years) and have never seen this happen once (nor
    heard about it). Of course if you repair or build computers for a living it
    comes as no surprise. In fact, I've noticed how much cheaper the equipment
    has become in recent years (quality, not price).
     
    Larry Smith, Oct 17, 2003
    #5
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been leaking
    fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the manufacturer.

    I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    replacement.


    "Larry Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:aUUjb.362667$...
    > > I'm sure this has happened to just about every tech with a decent amount

    > of
    > > time in the business.

    >
    > I program for a living (20+ years) and have never seen this happen once

    (nor
    > heard about it). Of course if you repair or build computers for a living

    it
    > comes as no surprise. In fact, I've noticed how much cheaper the equipment
    > has become in recent years (quality, not price).
    >
    >
     
    Mark, Oct 17, 2003
    #6
  7. Mark

    Thor Guest

    resistors are typically solid-material devices. What you likely saw was a
    failing capacitor. Electrolytic caps have an electrolyte fluid in them that
    can leak when the cap fails. Sometimes they fail quite spectacularly with
    smoke, fire or a big BANG!. It may have failed of it's own accord or it
    could have been induced to fail by a problem in that circuit.


    ...
    "Mark" <> wrote in message
    news:XhVjb.4465$...
    > Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been leaking
    > fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the manufacturer.
    >
    > I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    > replacement.
    >
    >
    > "Larry Smith" <> wrote in message
    > news:aUUjb.362667$...
    > > > I'm sure this has happened to just about every tech with a decent

    amount
    > > of
    > > > time in the business.

    > >
    > > I program for a living (20+ years) and have never seen this happen once

    > (nor
    > > heard about it). Of course if you repair or build computers for a living

    > it
    > > comes as no surprise. In fact, I've noticed how much cheaper the

    equipment
    > > has become in recent years (quality, not price).
    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Thor, Oct 18, 2003
    #7
  8. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Yes. That was it. Got my terms wrong. :)


    "Thor" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > resistors are typically solid-material devices. What you likely saw was a
    > failing capacitor. Electrolytic caps have an electrolyte fluid in them

    that
    > can leak when the cap fails. Sometimes they fail quite spectacularly with
    > smoke, fire or a big BANG!. It may have failed of it's own accord or it
    > could have been induced to fail by a problem in that circuit.
    >
    >
    > ..
    > "Mark" <> wrote in message
    > news:XhVjb.4465$...
    > > Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been leaking
    > > fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the manufacturer.
    > >
    > > I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    > > replacement.
    > >
    > >
    > > "Larry Smith" <> wrote in message
    > > news:aUUjb.362667$...
    > > > > I'm sure this has happened to just about every tech with a decent

    > amount
    > > > of
    > > > > time in the business.
    > > >
    > > > I program for a living (20+ years) and have never seen this happen

    once
    > > (nor
    > > > heard about it). Of course if you repair or build computers for a

    living
    > > it
    > > > comes as no surprise. In fact, I've noticed how much cheaper the

    > equipment
    > > > has become in recent years (quality, not price).
    > > >
    > > >

    > >
    > >

    >
    >
     
    Mark, Oct 18, 2003
    #8
  9. Mark

    mark mandell Guest

    "Larry Smith" <> wrote in message
    news:aUUjb.362667$...
    > > I'm sure this has happened to just about every tech with a decent amount

    > of
    > > time in the business.

    >
    > I program for a living (20+ years) and have never seen this happen once

    (nor
    > heard about it). Of course if you repair or build computers for a living

    it
    > comes as no surprise. In fact, I've noticed how much cheaper the equipment
    > has become in recent years (quality, not price>
    >

    Yes., like the 400 watt power supply that came with this cheapo case I
    bought at the Computer Expo last week.
    The price of this combo unit was SO low I knew I would soon replace the PSU
    which I did a few days later without even bothering to test the thing.

    Mark Mandell
     
    mark mandell, Oct 19, 2003
    #9
  10. Mark

    Plato Guest

    Mark wrote:
    >
    > I hooked up a system of a co-worker's to check over a few windows errors.
    > Turning on the system gave me quite an impressive display of fireworks from
    > the power supply. Opening up the PSU confirmed my suspisions, it was fried.
    > I was also greeted by an army of dust bunnies inside the case ans PSU.


    It happens. Yes since you moved the PC and all you did was turn it on
    makes you feel silly, but it's NOT your fault. Heck, sometimes when just
    adding a new battery on-site to replace a bad one can result in a
    "windows protection error" on the reboot. Again, there's nothing you
    could have done to prevent it. That's the nature of the business and why
    folks are paying you. The same would have occured if the owner tried the
    same him/herself.

    It's like old plumbing in a way. ie your pipes dont leak, but the
    plumber comes over to
    replace your water heater and wala, an old solder joint breaks apart and
    now there is
    more work. The "problem" was hidden and waiting to be discovered anyway.
    You just got to be the "lucky" one to "discover" it.



    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Oct 19, 2003
    #10
  11. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Well the results are in. No additional damage has been caused to other
    components.

    Thanks for all the comments and help.

    "Plato" <|@|.|> wrote in message
    news:3f9229e3$0$345$...
    > Mark wrote:
    > >
    > > I hooked up a system of a co-worker's to check over a few windows

    errors.
    > > Turning on the system gave me quite an impressive display of fireworks

    from
    > > the power supply. Opening up the PSU confirmed my suspisions, it was

    fried.
    > > I was also greeted by an army of dust bunnies inside the case ans PSU.

    >
    > It happens. Yes since you moved the PC and all you did was turn it on
    > makes you feel silly, but it's NOT your fault. Heck, sometimes when just
    > adding a new battery on-site to replace a bad one can result in a
    > "windows protection error" on the reboot. Again, there's nothing you
    > could have done to prevent it. That's the nature of the business and why
    > folks are paying you. The same would have occured if the owner tried the
    > same him/herself.
    >
    > It's like old plumbing in a way. ie your pipes dont leak, but the
    > plumber comes over to
    > replace your water heater and wala, an old solder joint breaks apart and
    > now there is
    > more work. The "problem" was hidden and waiting to be discovered anyway.
    > You just got to be the "lucky" one to "discover" it.
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Mark, Oct 21, 2003
    #11
  12. Mark

    Plato Guest

    Mark wrote:
    >
    > Well the results are in. No additional damage has been caused to other
    > components.


    cool
     
    Plato, Oct 21, 2003
    #12
  13. >From: "Mark"
    >Newsgroups: alt.computer
    >Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2003 13:03:54 -0400
    >
    >Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been leaking
    >fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the manufacturer.
    >
    >I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    >replacement.


    ROTFLMAO

    If you can not tell the difference between a capacitor and a resistor, you
    should not be working inside a PSU. Hell, I see no economic reason to open a
    PSU.

    :)

    --

    - -- - -- - --
    -- - -- - - -- - - - -- - - -- --
    - -- - - - -- - -- - -- -- -- -- - -- -
    --
    Necessity is the Mother of invention.

    I'd tell you a secret, but it wouldn't be a secret anymore.
     
    caveat lector - reader beware, Oct 23, 2003
    #13
  14. Mark

    V W Wall Guest

    caveat lector - reader beware wrote:
    >
    > >From: "Mark"
    > >Newsgroups: alt.computer
    > >Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2003 13:03:54 -0400
    > >
    > >Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been leaking
    > >fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the manufacturer.
    > >
    > >I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    > >replacement.

    >
    > ROTFLMAO
    >
    > If you can not tell the difference between a capacitor and a resistor, you
    > should not be working inside a PSU. Hell, I see no economic reason to open a
    > PSU.


    If you have a good power supply, it's well worth "opening" it to replace
    a fan/motor which has gone bad. You don't even have to disconnect the supply
    from the computer, but you do have to "open" it. $5 vs $40+! Takes about
    15 minutes to replace.

    Virg Wall
    --

    It is vain to do with more
    what can be done with fewer.
    William of Occam.
     
    V W Wall, Oct 23, 2003
    #14
  15. Mark

    Mark Guest

    I didn't claim to be a pro, and I didn't claim to be "working" on the PSU.
    If I was in fact a pro I wouldn't be asking questions on this newsgroup.

    Thank you for you useless insite anyway.


    " caveat lector - reader beware" <> wrote in
    message news:...
    > >From: "Mark"
    > >Newsgroups: alt.computer
    > >Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2003 13:03:54 -0400
    > >
    > >Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been leaking
    > >fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the manufacturer.
    > >
    > >I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    > >replacement.

    >
    > ROTFLMAO
    >
    > If you can not tell the difference between a capacitor and a resistor, you
    > should not be working inside a PSU. Hell, I see no economic reason to open

    a
    > PSU.
    >
    > :)
    >
    > --
    >
    > - -- - -- - --
    > -- - -- - - -- - - - -- - - -- --
    > - -- - - - -- - -- - -- -- -- -- - -- -
    > --
    > Necessity is the Mother of invention.
    >
    > I'd tell you a secret, but it wouldn't be a secret anymore.
    >
    >
     
    Mark, Oct 23, 2003
    #15
  16. Mark

    Night_Seer Guest

    caveat lector - reader beware wrote:
    >> From: "Mark"
    >> Newsgroups: alt.computer
    >> Date: Fri, 17 Oct 2003 13:03:54 -0400
    >>
    >> Actually I found out what went wrong. A large resistor had been
    >> leaking fluid inside the PSU. Likely due to cheap parts by the
    >> manufacturer.
    >>
    >> I'll let you guys know what the end result was after I install a
    >> replacement.

    >
    > ROTFLMAO
    >
    > If you can not tell the difference between a capacitor and a
    > resistor, you should not be working inside a PSU. Hell, I see no
    > economic reason to open a PSU.
    >
    > :)
    >
    > --
    >
    > - -- - -- - --
    > -- - -- - - -- - - - -- - - -- --
    > - -- - - - -- - -- - -- -- -- -- - -- -


    Hey but if you have a paperclip, go ahead and stick that in there...that's
    what real pros do.

    --
    Night_Seer
     
    Night_Seer, Oct 23, 2003
    #16
  17. Mark

    DeMoN LaG Guest

    V W Wall <> wrote in
    news::

    > If you have a good power supply, it's well worth "opening" it to
    > replace a fan/motor which has gone bad. You don't even have to
    > disconnect the supply from the computer, but you do have to "open" it.
    > $5 vs $40+! Takes about 15 minutes to replace.
    >


    The power supply in this machine cost me $75, the PSU in my new file server
    which isn't built yet costs over $100. If the fan stops working on any of
    these, you'd better bet your sweet ass I'm replacing the fan and not the
    PSU.

    Once again, CL doesn't know what he's talking about. Tells someone that
    they shouldn't be working inside a PSU because they don't know what they
    are doing, and there is no economic reason to do it. Earlier told someone
    that their P2 machine was trash and just junk it instead of figuring out
    why it locked up, and just buy a brand new machine.





    --
    AIM: FrznFoodClerk (actually me)
    email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    website: under construction
    Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    email/IM for rates/services
     
    DeMoN LaG, Oct 23, 2003
    #17
  18. Mark

    Mark Guest

    Yes and of course everyone can afford to go out and buy a new one right? :)
    Money does grow on trees after all.....

    "DeMoN LaG" <n@a> wrote in message
    news:Xns941D999836942Wobbly@216.168.3.30...
    > V W Wall <> wrote in
    > news::
    >
    > > If you have a good power supply, it's well worth "opening" it to
    > > replace a fan/motor which has gone bad. You don't even have to
    > > disconnect the supply from the computer, but you do have to "open" it.
    > > $5 vs $40+! Takes about 15 minutes to replace.
    > >

    >
    > The power supply in this machine cost me $75, the PSU in my new file

    server
    > which isn't built yet costs over $100. If the fan stops working on any of
    > these, you'd better bet your sweet ass I'm replacing the fan and not the
    > PSU.
    >
    > Once again, CL doesn't know what he's talking about. Tells someone that
    > they shouldn't be working inside a PSU because they don't know what they
    > are doing, and there is no economic reason to do it. Earlier told someone
    > that their P2 machine was trash and just junk it instead of figuring out
    > why it locked up, and just buy a brand new machine.
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > --
    > AIM: FrznFoodClerk (actually me)
    > email: de_on-lag@co_cast.net (_ = m)
    > website: under construction
    > Need a technician in the south Jersey area?
    > email/IM for rates/services
     
    Mark, Oct 24, 2003
    #18
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