Fricking Mac Update wiped out the admin accounts

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Bobs, Aug 24, 2009.

  1. Bobs

    Bobs Guest

    For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?
     
    Bobs, Aug 24, 2009
    #1
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  2. Bobs

    Sailor Sam Guest

    Bobs wrote:
    > For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    > Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?


    Tsk, tsk, tsk. Sounds like you're a dick, troublesome customer and all.
     
    Sailor Sam, Aug 24, 2009
    #2
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  3. Bobs

    Bobs Guest

    On Aug 24, 3:48 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    > Bobs wrote:
    > > For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > > the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > > and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > > Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > > the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    > > Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?

    >
    > Tsk, tsk, tsk. Sounds like you're a dick, troublesome customer and all.


    Yes, because a technical issue is the same as being a troublesome
    tosser.

    Don't you have to go out and buy a car and then demand a refund for
    the radio inside of it?
     
    Bobs, Aug 24, 2009
    #3
  4. Bobs

    Sailor Sam Guest

    Bobs wrote:
    > On Aug 24, 3:48 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >> Bobs wrote:
    >>> For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    >>> the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    >>> and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    >>> Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    >>> the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    >>> Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?

    >> Tsk, tsk, tsk. Sounds like you're a dick, troublesome customer and all.

    >
    > Yes, because a technical issue is the same as being a troublesome
    > tosser.
    >


    A technical issue, like, you broke it.

    > Don't you have to go out and buy a car and then demand a refund for
    > the radio inside of it?



    The car came without a stereo, thanks, just how I ordered it.
     
    Sailor Sam, Aug 24, 2009
    #4
  5. Bobs

    Bobs Guest

    On Aug 24, 4:02 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    > Bobs wrote:
    > > On Aug 24, 3:48 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    > >> Bobs wrote:
    > >>> For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > >>> the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > >>> and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > >>> Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > >>> the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    > >>> Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?
    > >> Tsk, tsk, tsk. Sounds like you're a dick, troublesome customer and all..

    >
    > > Yes, because a technical issue is the same as being a troublesome
    > > tosser.

    >
    > A technical issue, like, you broke it.


    Quite possibly. This is a nz.comp newsgroup is it not?

    >
    > > Don't you have to go out and buy a car and then demand a refund for
    > > the radio inside of it?

    >
    > The car came without a stereo, thanks, just how I ordered it.


    Exactly. Just how you bought the thing.
     
    Bobs, Aug 24, 2009
    #5
  6. Bobs

    Sailor Sam Guest

    Bobs wrote:
    > On Aug 24, 4:02 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >> Bobs wrote:
    >>> On Aug 24, 3:48 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >>>> Bobs wrote:
    >>>>> For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    >>>>> the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    >>>>> and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    >>>>> Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    >>>>> the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    >>>>> Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?
    >>>> Tsk, tsk, tsk. Sounds like you're a dick, troublesome customer and all.
    >>> Yes, because a technical issue is the same as being a troublesome
    >>> tosser.

    >> A technical issue, like, you broke it.

    >
    > Quite possibly. This is a nz.comp newsgroup is it not?
    >


    Well, given some of the replies to my question, I do seriously wonder.

    >>> Don't you have to go out and buy a car and then demand a refund for
    >>> the radio inside of it?

    >> The car came without a stereo, thanks, just how I ordered it.

    >
    > Exactly. Just how you bought the thing.


    Awesome, now how do I order a netbook the same way, because, as you may
    have missed, I was more than willing to buy the same product, sans
    Windows, with the appropriate discount.
     
    Sailor Sam, Aug 24, 2009
    #6
  7. Bobs

    EMB Guest

    Bobs wrote:
    > For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    > Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?



    It's all a part of the physiology of a Mac. Hook it up to a monitor ans
    check its vital signs - whichever ones are missing are the cause of the
    problem and can probably be reinstated. They can probably help you with
    this at work.
     
    EMB, Aug 24, 2009
    #7
  8. Bobs

    Alan Guest

    "Bobs" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts.
    > Wtf?
    > Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?
    >


    Hi Bobs,

    Given it's Apple's not yours, just ask for a replacement.

    Alan.

    --

    The views expressed are my own, not those of my employer or others.
    My unmunged email is: (valid for 30 days
    min probably much longer).
     
    Alan, Aug 24, 2009
    #8
  9. Bobs

    Alan Guest

    "Bobs" <> wrote in message
    news:4a922a5d$...
    >
    > Yes, thanks for that. Is this Cryptic Replies day or something?
    >


    Hi Bobs,

    Sorry about that - I thought you were referring to a Mac.

    Alan.

    --

    The views expressed are my own, not those of my employer or others.
    My unmunged email is: (valid for 30 days
    min probably much longer).
     
    Alan, Aug 24, 2009
    #9
  10. Bobs

    EMB Guest

    Bobs wrote:

    > Now I'm just confused. Either I know you or Macs have an odd what of
    > troubleshooting.


    I'd suggest the former option is more likely.
     
    EMB, Aug 24, 2009
    #10
  11. Bobs

    Alan Guest

    "Bobs" <> wrote in message
    news:4a925087$...
    > Alan wrote:
    >> "Bobs" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4a922a5d$...
    >>>
    >>> Yes, thanks for that. Is this Cryptic Replies day or something?
    >>>

    >>
    >> Hi Bobs,
    >>
    >> Sorry about that - I thought you were referring to a Mac.
    >>
    >> Alan.
    >>

    >
    > Pardon?
    >
    > Guess I'll just throw the damn thing out the window.
    >


    Not on my account I hope!

    I was just confused.


    Alan.

    --

    The views expressed are my own, not those of my employer or others.
    My unmunged email is: (valid for 30 days
    min probably much longer).
     
    Alan, Aug 24, 2009
    #11
  12. Bobs

    Mike Dee Guest

    Bobs wrote:

    > Alan wrote:
    >> "Bobs" <> wrote in message
    >> news:4a922a5d$...
    >>>
    >>> Yes, thanks for that. Is this Cryptic Replies day or something?
    >>>
    >>>

    >> Hi Bobs,
    >>
    >> Sorry about that - I thought you were referring to a Mac.
    >>
    >> Alan.
    >>
    >>

    > Pardon?
    >
    > Guess I'll just throw the damn thing out the window.


    Your problem (irrespective of what or who caused it) is an easy fix.
    Google "Mac OS X changing or resetting an account password" or try this
    link <http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1274> and scroll down page to section
    heading: Resetting the original administrator account password.

    HTH

    --
    dee
     
    Mike Dee, Aug 24, 2009
    #12
  13. Bobs

    David Empson Guest

    Mike Dee <> wrote:

    > Your problem (irrespective of what or who caused it) is an easy fix.
    > Google "Mac OS X changing or resetting an account password" or try this
    > link <http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1274> and scroll down page to section
    > heading: Resetting the original administrator account password.


    That only works for recognised administrator accounts. You can't reset
    the passord of a normal account or grant admin privileges using that
    tool.

    This one seems more relevant:

    <http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1278>

    It describes how to enable the root account using the install DVD, and
    then using the root account to restore admin rights to other accounts.


    This is a method I've found useful in the past.

    You can trick Mac OS X into running the "initial setup" procedure again,
    which creates a fresh administrator account. You don't need the install
    DVD to do this.

    1. Start up from the hard drive in single user mode (by holding down
    Cmd-Option-S).

    2. At the prompt, follow the printed instructions to do a file system
    check (fsck) and mount the startup volume with write access. I forget
    the exact commands, but they are something like this:

    fsck -fy
    mount -uw /

    3. Enter this command:

    rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone

    (This deletes the file which tells Mac OS X it has aleady done the
    iniital setup.)

    4. Enter this command:

    exit

    (This terminates single user mode and resumes normal startup.)

    After startup, you will get the introduction to Mac OS X video.

    5. After choosing a language, you will be asked for personal
    information. You can press Cmd-Q at this point to skip having to enter
    the registration details again. You will then be asked whether to use
    one of the existing accounts or to create a new account.

    6. Create a new account. It will be a temporary adminstrator which you
    will probably delete after everything else is working properly. Make
    sure its "short name" is different from any existing account name.

    7. When you've filled in the details, the new account will be created
    and set for automatic login. It logs in, and you should have admin
    access. You can then use System Preferences to restore admin privileges
    for the other accounts.

    If you _don't_ have admin access at this point then something more
    serious is wrong with the directory services database, which is
    preventing admin privileges from working at all.

    This might be a permissions problem: try booting from the install DVD,
    going into Disk Utility via the Utilities DVD and running the Repair
    Disk Permissions command.

    Failing that, my inclination would be to clone the hard drive, do an
    erase and install of the OS, then migrate the applications and user
    accounts back from the clone.


    The original problem may have been caused by something like third party
    software which hacks the system in unsupported ways.

    There were a few people who ran into this when 10.5 first came out, due
    to having an outdated version of Unsanity's "Application Enhancer"
    installed in their system. It didn't bother checking for future unknown
    system versions and tried patching itself into something which no longer
    existed, resulting in an unbootable system.

    The problem could be avoided by upgrading the software before installing
    10.5, or by using an "Archive & Install" (which leaves any third party
    kernel extensions behind in the Previous System).

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Aug 24, 2009
    #13
  14. Bobs

    Dick Boocky Guest

    On Aug 24, 3:31 pm, Bobs <> wrote:
    > For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts. Wtf?
    > Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?


    Get a proper computer.
     
    Dick Boocky, Aug 24, 2009
    #14
  15. Bobs

    Mike Dee Guest

    David Empson wrote:

    > Mike Dee <> wrote:
    >
    >> Your problem (irrespective of what or who caused it) is an easy fix.
    >> Google "Mac OS X changing or resetting an account password" or try this
    >> link <http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1274> and scroll down page to
    >> section heading: Resetting the original administrator account password.

    >
    > That only works for recognised administrator accounts. You can't reset the
    > passord of a normal account or grant admin privileges using that tool.


    Hmmm...

    With the above you only need a boot OS X install DVD or CD You do not
    need to enter any password you only overwrite an existing Admin user
    account password with a new one

    > This one seems more relevant:
    >
    > <http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1278>
    >
    > It describes how to enable the root account using the install DVD, and
    > then using the root account to restore admin rights to other accounts.


    It describes the same procedure as the HT1274 kb entry only the
    Administrator conditions are changed to reflect a Leopard problem which I
    concede - may be more relevant to the OP.

    ----HS1278

    # Start from your Mac OS X 10.5 Install DVD. (You do not need to install
    Leopard again.)

    # From the Utilities menu, choose Reset Password (do not choose Firmware
    Password Utility).

    # Follow the onscreen instructions to reset the root password (the root
    account is not the same as your account). Specifically: Select the name of
    the drive that Mac OS X is installed on, select the user named "System
    Administrator (root)" from the pop-up menu, type the password in the first
    field, re-enter the password in the second field, then click the Save
    button.

    # Restart from your Mac OS X Leopard volume.

    ----\HS1278

    ----HT1274

    Resetting the original administrator account password

    Follow these steps to reset a password when there is only one
    administrator account on the computer, or if the original administrator
    account needs a password reset. "Original" administrator account refers to
    the one that was created immediately after installing Mac OS X. If the
    original administrator password is known, that administrator account may
    be used to reset the passwords of other administrator accounts using the
    steps described above.

    1. Start up from a Mac OS X Install disc (one whose version is closest
    to the version of Mac OS X installed). Usually, you can start from the
    disc by putting it in your computer, restarting, and holding the C key.
    Or, put it in the computer and click the Install or Restore icon you
    see in the disc's main window (after which the computer will start from
    the disc without you needing to hold C). Or, you can use Startup
    Manager or the Startup Disk preference pane to select the Install disc.

    2. Choose a language, click the arrow button to continue, then choose
    Reset Password from the Utilities menu (or from the Installer menu, if
    using Mac OS X 10.3.9 or earlier). Tip: If you don't see this menu or
    menu choice, you're probably not started from the CD yet.

    Note: The default keyboard layout is U.S. English while started from
    the installation disc. If you use a keyboard layout other than U.S
    English, use the Input menu (the flag icon on the right side of the
    menu bar) to select the desired layout before typing a new password.

    3. Select your Mac OS X hard disk volume.

    4. Select the user name of your original administrator account.

    Important: Do not select "System Administrator (root)". This is
    actually the root user. You should not confuse it with a normal
    administrator account.

    5. Enter a new password.
    6. Click Save.

    ----\HT1274

    > This is a method I've found useful in the past.
    >
    > You can trick Mac OS X into running the "initial setup" procedure again,
    > which creates a fresh administrator account. You don't need the install
    > DVD to do this.
    >
    > 1. Start up from the hard drive in single user mode (by holding down
    > Cmd-Option-S).
    >
    > 2. At the prompt, follow the printed instructions to do a file system
    > check (fsck) and mount the startup volume with write access. I forget the
    > exact commands, but they are something like this:
    >
    > fsck -fy
    > mount -uw /
    >
    > 3. Enter this command:
    >
    > rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone
    >
    > (This deletes the file which tells Mac OS X it has aleady done the iniital
    > setup.)
    >
    > 4. Enter this command:
    >
    > exit
    >
    > (This terminates single user mode and resumes normal startup.)
    >
    > After startup, you will get the introduction to Mac OS X video.
    >
    > 5. After choosing a language, you will be asked for personal information.
    > You can press Cmd-Q at this point to skip having to enter the registration
    > details again. You will then be asked whether to use one of the existing
    > accounts or to create a new account.
    >
    > 6. Create a new account. It will be a temporary adminstrator which you
    > will probably delete after everything else is working properly. Make sure
    > its "short name" is different from any existing account name.
    >
    > 7. When you've filled in the details, the new account will be created and
    > set for automatic login. It logs in, and you should have admin access. You
    > can then use System Preferences to restore admin privileges for the other
    > accounts.
    >
    > If you _don't_ have admin access at this point then something more serious
    > is wrong with the directory services database, which is preventing admin
    > privileges from working at all.
    >
    > This might be a permissions problem: try booting from the install DVD,
    > going into Disk Utility via the Utilities DVD and running the Repair Disk
    > Permissions command.
    >
    > Failing that, my inclination would be to clone the hard drive, do an erase
    > and install of the OS, then migrate the applications and user accounts
    > back from the clone.
    >
    >
    > The original problem may have been caused by something like third party
    > software which hacks the system in unsupported ways.
    >
    > There were a few people who ran into this when 10.5 first came out, due to
    > having an outdated version of Unsanity's "Application Enhancer" installed
    > in their system. It didn't bother checking for future unknown system
    > versions and tried patching itself into something which no longer existed,
    > resulting in an unbootable system.
    >
    > The problem could be avoided by upgrading the software before installing
    > 10.5, or by using an "Archive & Install" (which leaves any third party
    > kernel extensions behind in the Previous System).


    I'll keep this in mind if I ever find myself in that unfortunate position
    (have archived this for my own future reference) ;-)

    Thanks.

    --
    dee
     
    Mike Dee, Aug 24, 2009
    #15
  16. Bobs

    David Empson Guest

    Mike Dee <> wrote:

    > David Empson wrote:
    >
    > > Mike Dee <> wrote:
    > >
    > >> Your problem (irrespective of what or who caused it) is an easy fix.
    > >> Google "Mac OS X changing or resetting an account password" or try this
    > >> link <http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1274> and scroll down page to
    > >> section heading: Resetting the original administrator account password.

    > >
    > > That only works for recognised administrator accounts. You can't reset the
    > > passord of a normal account or grant admin privileges using that tool.

    >
    > Hmmm...
    >
    > With the above you only need a boot OS X install DVD or CD You do not
    > need to enter any password you only overwrite an existing Admin user
    > account password with a new one


    The OP's problem wasn't a lost password. It was lost admin status for an
    account. You can't fix that directly with the Reset Password utility.

    It can't do anything with non-admin accounts (at least, it couldn't when
    I last used it, which might have been 10.4).

    Its only function is to reset the password for an existing admin account
    (or root). root gets enabled as a side effect of setting its password.

    > > This one seems more relevant:
    > >
    > > <http://support.apple.com/kb/TS1278>
    > >
    > > It describes how to enable the root account using the install DVD, and
    > > then using the root account to restore admin rights to other accounts.

    >
    > It describes the same procedure as the HT1274 kb entry only the
    > Administrator conditions are changed to reflect a Leopard problem which I
    > concede - may be more relevant to the OP.


    Yes, and I hope this method will work in Bobs' case. It might not, if
    the directory services database is damaged in some way which prevents
    all admin accounts from being recognised as admin accounts.

    [snip details of "create new admin account" trick]

    > I'll keep this in mind if I ever find myself in that unfortunate position
    > (have archived this for my own future reference) ;-)


    I learned that trick after having to do it the hard way once, when a
    friend somehow managed to disable admin rights on his only account.

    My original solution was to go into single user mode, edit the "sudoers"
    file to grant sudo privileges to a normal user, then used that user to
    run the appropriate netinfo command (this was 10.4 or earlier) to create
    a new admin user or otherwise grant itself full admin rights. I think.

    Much easier to just create a new admin user and use it to fix the other
    one.

    --
    David Empson
     
    David Empson, Aug 24, 2009
    #16
  17. Bobs

    Alan Guest

    "geoff" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Bobs wrote:
    >> Bobs wrote:
    >>> For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work?
    >>> First,
    >>> the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no
    >>> reason
    >>> and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th
    >>> occassion.
    >>> Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts
    >>> on
    >>> the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts.
    >>> Wtf? Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?

    >>
    >> Well since everyone decided being a smart arse and replying with
    >> nonsensical replies would be funny, I did some trawling and found a
    >> way to do it. Go in as root (via recovery disc) and change the user
    >> back to admin. Sounds easy and unix like, will probably destroy
    >> something though.
    >> A known "issue" by the way according to Apple. One would think a
    >> pretty major one.

    >
    > But Macs don't have 'issues'.
    >
    > geoff
    >


    More specifically, you are not permitted to have any issues if you
    borrow a Mac from Apple.

    If you think you do have issues, then you are wrong.

    Alan.

    --

    The views expressed are my own, not those of my employer or others.
    My unmunged email is: (valid for 30 days
    min probably much longer).
     
    Alan, Aug 25, 2009
    #17
  18. Bobs

    Enkidu Guest

    Bobs wrote:
    >
    > For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work? First,
    > the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for no reason
    > and no error message, but then decided to work on the 4th occassion.
    > Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the admin accounts on
    > the machine to standard. So now I have no (known) admin accounts.
    > Wtf? Is there a hidden admin account on this thing?
    >

    Macs never go wrong. You must be mistaken.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Aug 25, 2009
    #18
  19. Bobs

    Enkidu Guest

    Bobs wrote:
    > On Aug 24, 3:48 pm, Sailor Sam <> wrote:
    >> Bobs wrote:
    >>> For christs sake, I thought Macs were supposed to just work?
    >>> First, the damn upgrade from 10.4 to 10.5 failed three times for
    >>> no reason and no error message, but then decided to work on the
    >>> 4th occassion. Now I've updated it to 10.5.8 and its changed the
    >>> admin accounts on the machine to standard. So now I have no
    >>> (known) admin accounts. Wtf? Is there a hidden admin account on
    >>> this thing?

    >> Tsk, tsk, tsk. Sounds like you're a dick, troublesome customer and
    >> all.

    >
    > Yes, because a technical issue is the same as being a troublesome
    > tosser.
    >

    It's not a technical issue. Macs do not suffer from technical issues.
    They just work.

    Cheers,

    Cliff

    --

    The Internet is interesting in that although the nicknames may change,
    the same old personalities show through.
     
    Enkidu, Aug 25, 2009
    #19
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