Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a line drawing

Discussion in 'Digital Photography' started by Tony Palermo, Dec 27, 2012.

  1. Tony Palermo

    Tony Palermo Guest

    Re: Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a linedrawing

    p-0'0-h the cat wrote:

    >>QUESTION: What's the advantage of this trace being a vector diagram?

    > http://www.graphicdesignforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=41


    Nice find. Here's a quick summary of the content (as I read it):

    - Vectors are paths (points+curves which is good for logos & fonts)
    - Rasters are pixels (boxes-on-grid which is good for photos)

    - Vectors = points + math (how CAD programs work)
    - Rasters = bitmaps = pixels = grid (how computer monitors & TVs work)

    - Vectors (connect-the-dots) formats are eps, ai, FHx, etc.
    - Rasters (pixels-on-a-grid) formats are tiff, pict, jpeg, bmp, etc.

    - Vectors are upward scalable and provide clean lines
    - Rasters don't scale well (interpolate) & provide jagged line edges (pixelate)

    - Vector quality does not change based on size
    - Raster quality is determined by size & resolution (2400 x 1600 @ 300 dpi)

    - Vector curves that complete can be colored inside
    - Raster boxes have a numerical value for color

    - Vectors are good for sharp line graphics at any size
    - Raster is good for print images & web at a small size

    - Vectors are smaller and edit faster
    - Rasters are bigger and edit slower

    - Vectors scale up perfectly
    - Rasters scale up pixelated

    - Vector curves can be assigned any color (whether solid or gradient)
    - Raster boxes are limited in color assignments (yet are more lush)

    - Illustration editors are (mostly) vector based (e.g., Inkscape, Illustrator)
    - Photo editors are (mostly) raster based (e.g., Irfanview, Photoshop)

    See also:
    http://freerangestock.com/understanding/vector_bitmap/Part1_Bitmap.html
     
    Tony Palermo, Dec 28, 2012
    #21
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  2. Tony Palermo

    Tony Palermo Guest

    Re: Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a linedrawing

    J. Clarke wrote:

    >> QUESTION: What's the advantage of this trace being a vector diagram?

    >
    > Triple-click and you should see handles appear all over the place.
    > You can use those to fine-tune.


    Ah, indeed. I see what you mean!
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11809954/img/11809954.png
     
    Tony Palermo, Dec 28, 2012
    #22
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  3. Tony Palermo

    Tony Palermo Guest

    Re: Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a linedrawing

    kcGSH6nC wrote:

    > Inkscape can do tracing.


    I'm a little confused by Inkscape since it does line "tracing" two
    different ways and I'm not really sure which is the way to recommend.

    INKSCAPE METHOD 1: VECTOR TRACING:
    INKSCAPE METHOD 2: EDGE DETECTION

    VECTOR TRACING:
    1. Save the picture below to /tmp/kids1.jpg
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    2. Add a line drawing of the picture to a layer on TOP of that picture:
    $ cd /tmp; inkscape kids1.jpg &
    Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    Inkscape: Path->Trace Bitmap->(o)Edge detection->Update->OK
    RESULT:
    http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/11784878/img/11784878.png
    3. Delete the original picture:
    Inkscape: Move the top trace layer off a bit to the side
    Inkscape: Select the bottom photograph layer
    Inkscape: Edit->Delete (this deletes the original photograph)
    Inkscape: Triple click on the vector diagram to visualize the points
    Inkscape: Modify the mathematical vector paths as desired.
    Inkscape: File->Save As->kids2.svg
    RESULT:
    http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/11784885/img/11784885.png
    4. Compare the vector trace of the outlines with the original:
    $ convert kids1.jpg kids2.svg +append kids3.jpg
    RESULT:
    http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11785731/img/11785731.jpg

    EDGE DETECTION:
    1. Save the picture below to /tmp/kids1.jpg
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg

    2. Add a line drawing of the picture to a layer on TOP of that picture:
    $ cd /tmp; inkscape kids1.jpg &
    Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    Inkscape: Path->Trace Bitmap->(o)Edge detection->Update->OK

    RESULT:
    http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/11784878/img/11784878.png

    3. Delete the original picture:
    Inkscape: Move the top trace layer off a bit to the side
    Inkscape: Select the bottom photograph layer
    Inkscape: Edit->Delete (this deletes the original photograph)
    Inkscape: File->Save As->kids2.svg

    RESULT:
    http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/11784885/img/11784885.png

    4. Compare the vector trace of the outlines with the original:
    $ convert kids1.jpg kids2.svg +append kids3.jpg

    RESULT:
    http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11785731/img/11785731.jpg
     
    Tony Palermo, Dec 28, 2012
    #23
  4. On Fri, 28 Dec 2012, (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:

    >Anonymous <> wrote:
    >>On Wed, 26 Dec 2012, (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:
    >>>
    >>>Then try the edge detection algorithms. And afterwards
    >>>try once again to see what both USM as well as contrast
    >>>and brightness adjustments do.
    >>>

    >>I love Gimp, especially because it's called "the" Gimp. Used

    >
    >Heh heh... it's all upper case: The GIMP.
    >
    >>Awesome photos! Thanks for sharing that.
    >>
    >>In the early-1980s, I met a guy who was born and raised in Barrow,
    >>Alaska. His name was Ray Betz, a healthy and strong looking man
    >>in his 20s.

    >
    >I don't know of anyone here today with the surname Betz,
    >but since he was not living here it is very likely that
    >his father had come here to work, got married, and
    >eventual returned to the Lower-48.
    >

    You'd have a better idea of that than I would. I can't imagine
    any other reason someone would move to a location 29 degrees
    latitude from the North Pole . . . burrrrrrrrr!

    >>He had an "extra" layer of fat on his face and body,

    >
    >Yep, that is one common genetic adaption. There is
    >another, which is very common among virtually all Native
    >people in Alaska, where their capillaries near the
    >surface in the facial areas will rapidly dilate if they
    >get cold. A person who does not do that will walk
    >outside and it may be a long time before they have a
    >bright reddish look to their face, but someone who has
    >the right genetic code will have reddish looking cheeks
    >in very short order!
    >
    >There are also environmental adaptions that eventually
    >take place. For example, I spent my teenage years in
    >the deserts of southern Arizona, and was well aware that
    >people who moved there from other places, as I had, took
    >commonly 1 or 2 years to adapt well enough to spend any
    >time outside at temperatures over 100 degrees. On the
    >other hand, after moving to Alaska in my early 20's it
    >was obvious that the same adaption to living in -20F
    >weather took about 2 months.
    >

    In the summer of 1962, my folks took us kids on vacation from
    Ohio to Disneyland by way of automobile. On the return trip, we
    passed through Death Valley and stopped at the big thermometer
    there that marked the lowest land point in North America. It
    was so hot driving through that area that we had to roll all
    the windows down and run the car's heater on full blast in order
    to prevent the engine from overheating. Arizona sure was
    beautiful, with the Painted Desert, Grand Canyon, and a trading
    post along the way. In those days, you could purchase authentic
    native american turquoise and silver jewelry for next to nothing.

    >But I was really surprised at the level of adaption to
    >cold I've experienced living in Barrow. Our average
    >temperature is below zero, but unlike the Interior of
    >Alaska, we don't ever get "warm". People living in
    >Fairbanks see -60F almost ever year, but they also see
    >+90F every year too. Here we rarely see anything colder
    >than -40, but we only have a few days each year that are
    >above 60F, and usually it never hits 70 for even one
    >day.
    >

    I suppose that people could adapt to just about any land climate
    north of Antarctica. When people ask me what religion in believe
    in, I respond that I'm a sun-worshipper. I almost froze to death
    once when I got lost in an unexpected white-out blizzard, and I
    have no plans of going through anything like that again. Every
    time I see sunny skies I'm out there soaking it up like a sponge.

    >So what I found was that after 5 or 6 years of never
    >seeing anything in the 70's, I am almost unable to
    >function when it is that warm. Granted that advancing
    >age is part of that, but the degree of adaption has been
    >amazing. For example, I was out running around town
    >doing a variety of things yesterday. It was roughly
    >-10F. Most folks who live anywhere south of here would
    >have been wearing some kind of a "polar parka". I had a
    >short sleeve shirt and a hoodie on. The hoodie was
    >double lined, but it is what a lot of people would
    >consider too light for 50 or 60 degrees.
    >
    >I've decided too, that because I'm approaching middle
    >age so fast, that I really should wear gloves in the
    >winter too. So I usually do now, but not necessarily.
    >


    Unless it's sub-zero or single digit winter temperatures that
    warrant the heavy down clothing and winter hiking boots, I avoid
    overdressing and dress a little more like my friend Ray Betz did,
    although I add fingerless mitts, headband, microfleece hoodie, and
    backpack. Dressing in flat-black colored clothing sure helps to
    soak up the warming sunlight and it contrasts against the white of
    snow, and dressing in layers helps because the late-winter
    temperatures tend to rise more quickly here at 39 degrees north
    and 7,300 feet above sea level in the Colorado Rockies.

    >>and a uniquely rosy-red appearance to his otherwise ultra-white
    >>facial cheeks different from, and far healthier looking than,
    >>common rosacea. Frankly, his face looked naturally fatted like
    >>that of a seal, a penguin, or a walrus. He was very intelligent.
    >>
    >>During the winter, he would show up to work wearing a tee-shirt,
    >>shorts, and tennis shoes, while everybody else was bundled up in
    >>down parkas, winter boots, gloves, caps, and so forth, shivering
    >>while he was almost sweating. As summer drew on, he was miserably
    >>hot and sweated profusely. We'd become friends by then and I saw
    >>this happen to him, and to his wife, at the small apartment which
    >>they had rented. Apart from the huge difference in climate, they
    >>seemed otherwise perfectly normal. At the time it made me grateful
    >>that I was used to living in a chilly winter climate where I live
    >>than in Barrow, Alaska, or north-eastern Siberia for that matter.

    >
    >I have a friend who was raised here, though he arrived
    >at age 6. It seems that he and a local kid that he grew
    >up with, got to be old enough for military duty back in
    >the 1970's, and they ended up joining the Navy together
    >in San Diego. So, these two guys in their early 20's
    >went down to Mexico, and took a tour of Tijuana. All
    >was fine until they tried to re-enter the US. They got
    >the 3rd degree, and the border guys literally tore their
    >vehicle apart, put them in separate rooms and grilled
    >them about each other and everything.
    >
    >They finally put them back in one room, and more or less
    >said something to the effect that they were positive
    >these two guy were up to something, it might take a week
    >but they'd find it, so why not just confess now and get
    >it over with!
    >
    >The guys are a bit astounded of course. They eventually
    >got argumentative enough to demand to know what ever it
    >might be that caused anyone to think they had to be
    >guilty. The answer was that it was a very cold day in
    >December, and the two of them were both sweating! It
    >was above freezing, maybe 40 degrees, which to them was
    >a nice summer day. The friend of mine says he told them
    >to @#$%^&* look at his drivers license and see where he
    >was from. Then he said look at the other guys' license,
    >and look at his name! The guy is a freaking ESKIMO, and
    >he's sweating because it is so blasted HOT here! Lights
    >finally started to go on, and it wasn't long before they
    >were on their way.


    Oh man! I bet they never planned to make a return trip south
    of the Canadian border after that sort of business.

    Cheers,

    --
    Bub
     
    Dave U. Random, Dec 28, 2012
    #24
  5. Tony Palermo

    Anonymous Guest

    On Sat, 29 Dec 2012, (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:

    >Dave U. Random <> wrote:
    >>On Fri, 28 Dec 2012, (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:
    >>
    >>>Anonymous <> wrote:
    >>>>On Wed, 26 Dec 2012, (Floyd L. Davidson) wrote:
    >>>>>
    >>>>>Then try the edge detection algorithms. And afterwards
    >>>>>try once again to see what both USM as well as contrast
    >>>>>and brightness adjustments do.
    >>>>>
    >>>>I love Gimp, especially because it's called "the" Gimp. Used
    >>>
    >>>Heh heh... it's all upper case: The GIMP.
    >>>
    >>>>Awesome photos! Thanks for sharing that.
    >>>>
    >>>>In the early-1980s, I met a guy who was born and raised in Barrow,
    >>>>Alaska. His name was Ray Betz, a healthy and strong looking man
    >>>>in his 20s.
    >>>
    >>>I don't know of anyone here today with the surname Betz,
    >>>but since he was not living here it is very likely that
    >>>his father had come here to work, got married, and
    >>>eventual returned to the Lower-48.
    >>>

    >>You'd have a better idea of that than I would. I can't imagine
    >>any other reason someone would move to a location 29 degrees
    >>latitude from the North Pole . . . burrrrrrrrr!

    >
    >The usual reason people come here is simple: money. The
    >reason they stay is adventure and community. The cold
    >helps with all three!
    >

    That makes sense, natural survival instinct being the key ingredient.

    >...
    >
    >>I suppose that people could adapt to just about any land climate
    >>north of Antarctica. When people ask me what religion in believe
    >>in, I respond that I'm a sun-worshipper. I almost froze to death
    >>once when I got lost in an unexpected white-out blizzard, and I
    >>have no plans of going through anything like that again. Every
    >>time I see sunny skies I'm out there soaking it up like a sponge.

    >
    >Well, one odd thing about deserts, warm or cold, they
    >are very similar! Barrow is one of the wettest deserts
    >in the world, but the annual precipitation (including
    >snow) amounts to less than 5 inches of equivalent
    >rainfall. That is less than the Sonoran Desert where I
    >lived in Arizona! Of course the water here is frozen
    >from October through June, and the business of being
    >"wet" is only true in June during breakup, and a little
    >bit so in August and September when it drizzles a bit.
    >
    >I was born in western Washington State, and what I
    >learned from living in southern Arizona was that I
    >really do not like rain. Hence Tucson or Barrow... I'll
    >take Barrow as it has half the rain that Tucson does!
    >
    >However, there is something interesting in the way of
    >differences that relate to getting lost in a whiteout.
    >In a desert... it's what you do that you shouldn't have
    >done that will kill you. Get lost? Sit under the
    >nearest bush for shade and doing nothing will probably
    >keep you alive.
    >
    >Get lost in the Arctic... you'd better know what to do,
    >because it's what you don't do that should have been done
    >that kills you. Sit down and do nothing and you'll die.
    >

    At night that could be tall order, as I found out the hard way.
    Suffice to say I was inadequately dressed and caught completely off
    guard. I had no choice but to spend the night shivering under wet,
    freshly broken evergreen tree branches at 11,000' altitude. As
    dawn approached, it took me an hour merely to stand up. My clothing
    was covered in ice, but I slowly started walking down the
    mountainside until I found a trickling creek and followed it down to
    the local ranch several miles away through fairly rugged and densely
    wooded terrain. It was do or die.

    >>>I've decided too, that because I'm approaching middle
    >>>age so fast, that I really should wear gloves in the
    >>>winter too. So I usually do now, but not necessarily.

    >
    >I guess I should have pointed out for the benefit of some
    >folks that middle age is defined as 4-5 years older than I
    >am at the moment, assuming that today I can do enough to have
    >fun and that in 4-5 years that might not be true...
    >
    >I've been rapidly approaching middle age since the 70's when
    >an old guy (he was a dozen years younger then than I am now)
    >explained that to me.
    >
    >>Unless it's sub-zero or single digit winter temperatures that
    >>warrant the heavy down clothing and winter hiking boots, I avoid
    >>overdressing and dress a little more like my friend Ray Betz did,
    >>although I add fingerless mitts, headband, microfleece hoodie, and
    >>backpack. Dressing in flat-black colored clothing sure helps to
    >>soak up the warming sunlight and it contrasts against the white of
    >>snow, and dressing in layers helps because the late-winter
    >>temperatures tend to rise more quickly here at 39 degrees north
    >>and 7,300 feet above sea level in the Colorado Rockies.

    >
    >That altitude is probably significant, at least if it
    >results in any winds at all.
    >

    It can get seriously windy at times, but more often the weather is
    what I would describe as "doable" for hiking and so forth.

    >We are surrounded by water on three sides, and very very
    >flat land for 200 miles south (where everything then
    >bumps into 12,000 foot mountains that absolutely isolate
    >our weather from anything south of that point. Our
    >normal wind is about 10 MPH. We only see less
    >than 6 MPH for very short transitions as storms move
    >from west to east along the coast. We used to get 60-70
    >MPH sustained winds, but that's been very rare for the
    >last decade. 40-50 MPH gusts are relatively common and
    >can last for two or three days.
    >

    Wow! At such uber-subzero temperatures the wind chill must be
    astronomical. It makes me wonder how in the world polar bears
    and other polar animals could survive in the outdoors year-round.
    At least the whales and other ocean life have the unfrozen waters
    to keep them protected from the harsh weather above. As fortune
    would have it, I just watched a movie on HBO last night about the
    whales that were saved from drowning under the encroaching ice off
    Point Barrow. I looked it up on Wikipedia and which says that the
    film 'Big Miracle' was (loosely) based on a true story, and was
    not filmed in Barrow but in Seward and Anchorage.

    >Overall, it's a very harsh climate, which results in
    >this being a place with a very adventurous environment,
    >and a community that expects that and because of it is
    >very close. (It also happens to be a very international
    >community where different peoples necessarily rub elbows
    >all day every day and cannot isolate themselves with
    >only similar people. Another really nice effect on
    >culture and community.)
    >

    I'm reminded of the famous American revolution quote attributed to
    Franklin that we all hang together or we'll all hang separately.

    >...
    >
    >>>The guys are a bit astounded of course. They eventually
    >>>got argumentative enough to demand to know what ever it
    >>>might be that caused anyone to think they had to be
    >>>guilty. The answer was that it was a very cold day in
    >>>December, and the two of them were both sweating! It
    >>>was above freezing, maybe 40 degrees, which to them was
    >>>a nice summer day. The friend of mine says he told them
    >>>to @#$%^&* look at his drivers license and see where he
    >>>was from. Then he said look at the other guys' license,
    >>>and look at his name! The guy is a freaking ESKIMO, and
    >>>he's sweating because it is so blasted HOT here! Lights
    >>>finally started to go on, and it wasn't long before they
    >>>were on their way.

    >>
    >>Oh man! I bet they never planned to make a return trip south
    >>of the Canadian border after that sort of business.

    >
    >Ha! They put in a few years in the UR ASS Navy, bombing
    >Asians, and chasing women in warm climates...
    >

    George Carlin probably said it best about "bombing brown people"
    during his "Jammin' in New York" HBO special in 1992 at the Paramount
    Theater in Madison Square Garden.

    >And it is true they both came back to Alaska and have
    >not left for at least a couple decades now. Old
    >geezers, almost... :)


    Good for them. They obviously adhered to the wise "fool me once"
    school of thought. It's been interesting to converse with you,
    Floyd.

    --
    Bub
     
    Anonymous, Dec 30, 2012
    #25
  6. Tony Palermo

    wexfordpress Guest

    On Dec 27, 1:51 pm, Tony Palermo <>
    wrote:
    > Dave wrote:
    > > There's a simple "pencil" plugin for Gimp too.
    > >http://registry.gimp.org/node/22018

    >
    > Thanks for that suggestion.
    >
    > Having never installed a freeware Gimp plugin before, I wrote this up
    > for others to benefit, which uses that suggested "Pencil-Drawing" plugin.
    >
    > 0. Choose a picture to turn into a line drawing, e.g., /tmp/kids1.jpg
    >    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    >
    > 1. Download the script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm script to /tmp from
    >    http://registry.gimp.org/node/22018
    >
    > 2. Read up on how to handle "scm" files for The Gimp:
    >    http://registry.gimp.org/node/13950
    >
    >    Which says:
    >    If it ends in .scm, put it in the scripts folder.
    >    If it ends in .exe, put it in the plugins folder.
    >    If it ends in .py,  put it in the plug-ins folder.
    >
    > 3. Since it ends in scm, locate the proper scripts folder:
    >    $ sudo updatedb; locate gimp| grep -i script
    >    REPORTS: /usr/share/gimp/2.0/scripts/ & ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/
    >
    > 4. Both directories worked for me, so use your personal preference:
    >    $ sudo cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm /usr/share/gimp/2.0/scripts/.
    >    or
    >    $ cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/.
    >
    > 5. Load the photo to be converted into The Gimp, version 2.6:
    >    $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    >
    > 6. Convert the picture to a coloring book pencil line drawing & save:
    >    Gimp: Filters->Pencil-Drawing->Blur Radius=4, Strength=1, OK
    >    Gimp: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.jpg
    >
    > 7. Compare the results, side by side:
    >    $ cd /tmp; /usr/bin/convert kids1.jpg kids2.jpg +append kids3.jpg
    >
    >    See results here:
    >    http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780526/img/11780526.jpg
    > ==============================================================
    > Note: Compare results with this TheGimp basic freeware method:
    >  $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    >    TheGimp: Filters->Edge Detect->Difference of Gaussians
    >    DoG Edge Detect: Radius 1=3.0, Radius 2=1.0 px [x]Normalize [x]Invert
    >  RESULTS:http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11775521/img/11775521.jpg
    >
    > Note: Compare results with this Gimp plugin script freeware method:
    >  $ cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/.
    >  $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    >    Gimp: Filters->Pencil-Drawing->Blur Radius=4, Strength=1, OK
    >    Gimp: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.jpg
    >  RESULTS:http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780526/img/11780526.jpg
    >
    > Note: Compare results with the Inkscape freeware method:
    >    $ /usr/bin/inkscape /tmp/kids1.jpg
    >      Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    >      Inkscape: Filters->Image effects->Pencil
    >      Inkscape: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.svg
    >    RESULTS:http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/11776480/img/11776480.gif
    >
    > Note: Compare results with the Cartoonize freeware method:
    >  http://www.cartoonize.net/
    >         Upload photo from disk: /tmp/kids1.jpg
    >         Select the 15th cartoon effect (3rd column, 5th row)
    >         Press the "Cartoonize Now" button & save the results.
    >  RESULTS:http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780666/img/11780666.jpg
    >
    > Which do you think is best for a family coloring book for toddlers?


    In addition to Gimp; look at Inkscape which works in vectors, more
    appropriate for a line drawing IMO.
     
    wexfordpress, Dec 31, 2012
    #26
  7. Re: Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a linedrawing

    Susan Bugher wrote on 10/21/08
    Wanted: a Photo into a caricature and/or simple line drawing?

    - show quoted text -
    Program: YouColor! (was) Segger
    Company: PoorBruce
    Author: Bruce Ball
    Ware: (Donationware) (free)
    http://www.poorbruce.com/

    "quickly create a personalized coloring book page"

    (I haven't tried it).

    Susan
    - end quoted text -


    In kbi5bl$1vg$, it was written:

    > Dave wrote:
    >
    >> There's a simple "pencil" plugin for Gimp too.
    >> http://registry.gimp.org/node/22018

    >
    > Thanks for that suggestion.
    >
    > Having never installed a freeware Gimp plugin before, I wrote this up
    > for others to benefit, which uses that suggested "Pencil-Drawing" plugin.
    >
    > 0. Choose a picture to turn into a line drawing, e.g., /tmp/kids1.jpg
    > http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    >
    > 1. Download the script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm script to /tmp from
    > http://registry.gimp.org/node/22018
    >
    > 2. Read up on how to handle "scm" files for The Gimp:
    > http://registry.gimp.org/node/13950
    >
    > Which says:
    > If it ends in .scm, put it in the scripts folder.
    > If it ends in .exe, put it in the plugins folder.
    > If it ends in .py, put it in the plug-ins folder.
    >
    > 3. Since it ends in scm, locate the proper scripts folder:
    > $ sudo updatedb; locate gimp| grep -i script
    > REPORTS: /usr/share/gimp/2.0/scripts/ & ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/
    >
    > 4. Both directories worked for me, so use your personal preference:
    > $ sudo cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm /usr/share/gimp/2.0/scripts/.
    > or
    > $ cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/.
    >
    > 5. Load the photo to be converted into The Gimp, version 2.6:
    > $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    >
    > 6. Convert the picture to a coloring book pencil line drawing & save:
    > Gimp: Filters->Pencil-Drawing->Blur Radius=4, Strength=1, OK
    > Gimp: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.jpg
    >
    > 7. Compare the results, side by side:
    > $ cd /tmp; /usr/bin/convert kids1.jpg kids2.jpg +append kids3.jpg
    >
    > See results here:
    > http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780526/img/11780526.jpg
    > ==============================================================
    > Note: Compare results with this TheGimp basic freeware method:
    > $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    > TheGimp: Filters->Edge Detect->Difference of Gaussians
    > DoG Edge Detect: Radius 1=3.0, Radius 2=1.0 px [x]Normalize [x]Invert
    > RESULTS: http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11775521/img/11775521.jpg
    >
    > Note: Compare results with this Gimp plugin script freeware method:
    > $ cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/.
    > $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    > Gimp: Filters->Pencil-Drawing->Blur Radius=4, Strength=1, OK
    > Gimp: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.jpg
    > RESULTS: http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780526/img/11780526.jpg
    >
    > Note: Compare results with the Inkscape freeware method:
    > $ /usr/bin/inkscape /tmp/kids1.jpg
    > Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    > Inkscape: Filters->Image effects->Pencil
    > Inkscape: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.svg
    > RESULTS: http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/11776480/img/11776480.gif
    >
    > Note: Compare results with the Cartoonize freeware method:
    > http://www.cartoonize.net/
    > Upload photo from disk: /tmp/kids1.jpg
    > Select the 15th cartoon effect (3rd column, 5th row)
    > Press the "Cartoonize Now" button & save the results.
    > RESULTS: http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780666/img/11780666.jpg
    >
    > Which do you think is best for a family coloring book for toddlers?
     
    Eric Prilovich, Jan 4, 2013
    #27
  8. Tony Palermo

    Tony Palermo Guest

    Re: Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a linedrawing

    *************************************************
    Summary of Linux methods: (I like #4 the best)
    **************************************************
    1. Inkscape Pencil Effect:
    Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    Inkscape: Filters->Image effects->Pencil
    Inkscape: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.svg
    Note: Drawing appears very light with fine lines.
    2. Inkscape Edge Detection:
    Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    Inkscape: Path->Trace Bitmap->(o)Edge detection->Update->OK
    Inkscape: Move the top trace layer off a bit to the side
    Inkscape: Triple click on the vector diagram to visualize the points
    Inkscape: File->Save As->kids2.svg
    Note: Drawing appears dark (with an optional transparent background).
    3. GIMP Pencil Effect:
    Gimp: Filters->Pencil-Drawing->Blur Radius=4, Strength=1, OK
    Gimp: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.jpg
    Note: Drawing appears light with fine lines (slightly more detail).
    4. GIMP Edge Detection:
    TheGimp: Filters->Edge Detect->Difference of Gaussians
    DoG Edge Detect: Radius 1=3.0, Radius 2=1.0 px [x]Normalize [x]Invert
    Note: Drawing appears slightly darker with fine lines (and more detail).
    **************************************************
    1. Inkscape Pencil Effect:
    **************************************************
    a. Save the picture below to /tmp/kids1.jpg
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    b. Open up the file in Inkscape
    $ cd /tmp; inkscape kids1.jpg &
    c. Run the pencil effect:
    Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    Inkscape: Filters->Image effects->Pencil
    d. Save the results and compare side by side:
    Inkscape: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.svg
    $ convert kids1.jpg kids2.svg +append kids3.gif
    Here is the result, side by side:
    http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/11776480/img/11776480.gif
    **************************************************
    2. Inkscape Edge Detection:
    **************************************************
    a. Save the picture below to /tmp/kids1.jpg
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    b. Add a line drawing of the picture to a layer on TOP of that picture:
    $ cd /tmp; inkscape kids1.jpg &
    Inkscape: Edit->Select All
    Inkscape: Path->Trace Bitmap->(o)Edge detection->Update->OK
    RESULT:
    http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/11784878/img/11784878.png
    c. Delete the original picture:
    Inkscape: Move the top trace layer off a bit to the side
    Inkscape: Select the bottom photograph layer
    Inkscape: Edit->Delete (this deletes the original photograph)
    Inkscape: Triple click on the vector diagram to visualize the points
    Inkscape: Modify the mathematical vector paths as desired.
    Inkscape: File->Save As->kids2.svg
    RESULT:
    http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/11784885/img/11784885.png
    d. Compare the vector trace of the outlines with the original:
    $ convert kids1.jpg kids2.svg +append kids3.jpg
    RESULT:
    http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11785731/img/11785731.jpg
    e. Optionally, convert to transparent GIF to then add to a background:
    $ convert kids2.svg kids2.gif
    $ kolourpaint kids2.gif
    Kolourpaint: File->Open File->background.jpg
    Kolourpaint: Edit->Paste From File->kids2.gif
    **************************************************
    3. GIMP Pencil Effect Filter:
    **************************************************
    a. Choose a picture to turn into a line drawing, e.g., /tmp/kids1.jpg
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    b. Download the script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm script to /tmp from
    http://registry.gimp.org/node/22018
    c. Read up on how to handle "scm" files for The Gimp:
    http://registry.gimp.org/node/13950
    Which says:
    If it ends in .scm, put it in the scripts folder.
    If it ends in .exe, put it in the plugins folder.
    If it ends in .py, put it in the plug-ins folder.
    d. Since it ends in scm, locate the proper scripts folder:
    $ sudo updatedb; locate gimp| grep -i script
    REPORTS: /usr/share/gimp/2.0/scripts/ & ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/
    e. Both directories worked for me, so use your personal preference:
    $ sudo cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm /usr/share/gimp/2.0/scripts/.
    or
    $ cp /tmp/script-fu-pencil-drawing.scm ~/.gimp-2.6/scripts/.
    f. Load the photo to be converted into The Gimp, version 2.6:
    $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    g. Convert the picture to a coloring book pencil line drawing & save:
    Gimp: Filters->Pencil-Drawing->Blur Radius=4, Strength=1, OK
    Gimp: File->Save As->/tmp/kids2.jpg
    h. Compare the results, side by side:
    $ cd /tmp; /usr/bin/convert kids1.jpg kids2.jpg +append kids3.jpg
    See results here:
    http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780526/img/11780526.jpg
    **************************************************
    4. GIMP Edge Detection:
    **************************************************
    a. Choose a picture to turn into a line drawing, e.g., /tmp/kids1.jpg
    http://www1.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780489/img/11780489.jpg
    b. Open up the photographi in The GIMP:
    $ /usr/bin/gimp kids1.jpg &
    c. Run the DoG filter:
    TheGimp: Filters->Edge Detect->Difference of Gaussians
    DoG Edge Detect: Radius 1=3.0, Radius 2=1.0 px [x]Normalize [x]Invert
    RESULTS: http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11775521/img/11775521.jpg
    **************************************************
    Cartoonize Method:
    **************************************************
    http://www.cartoonize.net/
    Upload photo from disk: /tmp/kids1.jpg
    Select the 15th cartoon effect (3rd column, 5th row)
    Press the "Cartoonize Now" button & save the results.
    RESULTS: http://www3.picturepush.com/photo/a/11780666/img/11780666.jpg
    **************************************************
    See also:
    http://www.poorbruce.com/YouColorSetup.htm (Windows only)
    http://www.fotosketcher.com (Windows only)
    http://www.irfanview.com (Windows only, Relief & Emboss_32 filter)
    https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/sketch-me!/id364365478?mt=8 (iPhone)
    **************************************************
     
    Tony Palermo, Jan 4, 2013
    #28
  9. Re: Freeware & techniques to turn a digital photo into a linedrawing

    In kc660v$gi1$, it was written:

    5. Gimp: Filters->Artistic->Photocopy
    6. Inkscape: Filters->Image effects,transparent->Alpha draw,color
     
    Eric Prilovich, Jan 4, 2013
    #29
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