frames per second on HDTV

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Tim923, Jul 2, 2004.

  1. Tim923

    Tim923 Guest

    Is it still 30 fps on 16:9 HDTV as it is for 4:3?
    Tim923, Jul 2, 2004
    #1
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  2. Tim923

    Biz Guest

    Biz, Jul 2, 2004
    #2
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  3. Tim923

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "Tim923" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > Is it still 30 fps on 16:9 HDTV as it is for 4:3?


    Both 720p and 1080i HD formats run at 60hz (30 frames per second), the
    same as NTSC. This has nothing to do with aspect ratio (16:9 or 4:3).
    Joshua Zyber, Jul 2, 2004
    #3
  4. Tim923

    Tim923 Guest

    I did read previously that in the US the frames per second is 30fps
    (slightly less), but I didn't know if this included HDTVs. Is it just
    a coincidence that ((2/60)+(3/60))/2 = 1/24? Seems like darn luck
    again!

    > Is it still 30 fps on 16:9 HDTV as it is for 4:3?
    >
    >Both 720p and 1080i HD formats run at 60hz (30 frames per second), the
    >same as NTSC. This has nothing to do with aspect ratio (16:9 or 4:3).
    >
    Tim923, Jul 2, 2004
    #4
  5. I read ffrom several places that HDTV is at 60 frames per second in the U.S.,
    not 30 frames per second like NTSC is.
    Waterperson77, Jul 2, 2004
    #5
  6. Tim923

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "Tim923" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I did read previously that in the US the frames per second is 30fps
    > (slightly less), but I didn't know if this included HDTVs.


    It does include HDTVs in the United States. The European HDTV standard
    will run at 50hz (25 fps) at both 720p and 1080i resolutions.
    Joshua Zyber, Jul 2, 2004
    #6
  7. Tim923

    Joshua Zyber Guest

    "Tim923" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > I did read previously that in the US the frames per second is 30fps
    > (slightly less), but I didn't know if this included HDTVs. Is it just
    > a coincidence that ((2/60)+(3/60))/2 = 1/24? Seems like darn luck
    > again!


    You do understand that these things are designed by engineers, right?
    Joshua Zyber, Jul 2, 2004
    #7
  8. Tim923

    Tim923 Guest

    ((3/60)+(2/60))/2 = 1/24, it's obviously a clever formula, but was it
    established after 30fps/60hz and 24fps were already established, or
    did they really design TVs with the intent of being able to convert
    film well to TV? It seemed improbable to me, but I'll admit I was
    wrong.

    2.35 nearly equals (4/3)^3, seems like luck to me, but maybe that is
    why they chose it, knowing that the geometric mean of the extreme
    aspect ratios (4/3, 2.35) would still be a power of (4/3), that is
    16:9. And the filmers were clever enough to know that TVs built on
    powers of (4/3) are easier to make and also knowing their movies would
    be shown on 16:9 TVs.

    >You do understand that these things are designed by engineers, right?
    Tim923, Jul 3, 2004
    #8
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