Frame Relay -HQ-remote offices slow connection

Discussion in 'Cisco' started by zillah, Jun 25, 2007.

  1. zillah

    zillah Guest

    I have been given this scenario :

    remote offices are connected to head quarter through WAN Frame Relay
    Connection, speeds of these frame connection are either 64 kbps or 128
    kbps.

    users in remote site experience slow connection to their head quarter.
    Applications are used as oracle database


    What steps of troubleshooting should I follow to find out the source
    of the problem ? is the bandwidth 64 or 128 are enough of 20 users or
    more at each site ?

    I do not have router's configuration to look at it

    This link for troubleshooting would not help me
    http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/itg_v1/tr1918.htm
    zillah, Jun 25, 2007
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. zillah

    Trendkill Guest

    On Jun 25, 5:55 am, (zillah) wrote:
    > I have been given this scenario :
    >
    > remote offices are connected to head quarter through WAN Frame Relay
    > Connection, speeds of these frame connection are either 64 kbps or 128
    > kbps.
    >
    > users in remote site experience slow connection to their head quarter.
    > Applications are used as oracle database
    >
    > What steps of troubleshooting should I follow to find out the source
    > of the problem ? is the bandwidth 64 or 128 are enough of 20 users or
    > more at each site ?
    >
    > I do not have router's configuration to look at it
    >
    > This link for troubleshooting would not help mehttp://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/itg_v1/tr1918.htm


    It completely depends on how the application works. If its high
    bandwidth and you are doing good-sized queries with decent return
    volume, then yes 64 vs 128 k is very very small and will probably be
    your issue. Get a snmp bandwidth monitor to watch the serial
    interfaces, or issue a show interface when the issue is occurring and
    check your transmit vs. receive. If you are seeing 200+/255, then yes
    your pipe is getting hammered and there is nothing you can do but
    either upgrade your WAN or try to work with the application teams to
    write better queries or figure out some kind of night time
    replication. At the core of this issue, 128 is only 16 kilobytes per
    second, and 20 users would make this less than a single KB per
    person. This means that any query that is done will end up being as
    long in seconds as it is in size of kilobytes. Having worked for a
    major grocery retailer for many years, we ran these circuits to our
    stores, but ended up going to 256 or 512 because common web
    applications needed more space, and we have to utilize QoS very
    carefully to protect EFT and financial transactions of the customers.
    I would guess you have a bandwidth issue, but you'd need to provide
    additional information.
    Trendkill, Jun 25, 2007
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. zillah

    BernieM Guest

    "zillah" <> wrote in message
    news:...
    >I have been given this scenario :
    >
    > remote offices are connected to head quarter through WAN Frame Relay
    > Connection, speeds of these frame connection are either 64 kbps or 128
    > kbps.
    >
    > users in remote site experience slow connection to their head quarter.
    > Applications are used as oracle database
    >
    >
    > What steps of troubleshooting should I follow to find out the source
    > of the problem ? is the bandwidth 64 or 128 are enough of 20 users or
    > more at each site ?
    >
    > I do not have router's configuration to look at it
    >
    > This link for troubleshooting would not help me
    > http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/itg_v1/tr1918.htm
    >


    You need to profile the application to determine what is a suitable
    bandwidth. By running a packet capture like Ethereal / Wireshark between
    the client and server you can determine how much data is returned by
    individual transactions. With that value you can calculate how much
    bandwidth is necessary to achieve acceptable user response times.

    BernieM
    BernieM, Jul 14, 2007
    #3
  4. zillah

    Guest

    On 14 Jul, 06:32, "BernieM" <> wrote:
    > "zillah" <> wrote in message
    >
    > news:...
    >
    >
    >
    >
    >
    > >I have been given this scenario :

    >
    > > remote offices are connected to head quarter through WAN Frame Relay
    > > Connection, speeds of these frame connection are either 64 kbps or 128
    > > kbps.

    >
    > > users in remote site experience slow connection to their head quarter.
    > > Applications are used as oracle database

    >
    > > What steps of troubleshooting should I follow to find out the source
    > > of the problem ? is the bandwidth 64 or 128 are enough of 20 users or
    > > more at each site ?

    >
    > > I do not have router's configuration to look at it

    >
    > > This link for troubleshooting would not help me
    > >http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/itg_v1/tr1918.htm

    >
    > You need to profile the application to determine what is a suitable
    > bandwidth. By running a packet capture like Ethereal / Wireshark between
    > the client and server you can determine how much data is returned by
    > individual transactions. With that value you can calculate how much
    > bandwidth is necessary to achieve acceptable user response times.


    You also need to consider the effect that the
    distance netween the offices may have. For some
    applications even a few hundred miles can make a big
    difference, A few thousand miles renders many
    applciations useless.

    The key here is the number of network level
    request/response pairs per user operation. If it is
    say 100 and the two machines are 3000 miles apart
    then each user operation will take about
    100 x 0.1 second or 10 seconds. This is likely to
    be unnaceptable.

    The Round Trip Time between New York and
    London is about 0.070 seconds but can be more
    if a less direct route is used.
    , Jul 14, 2007
    #4
  5. zillah

    BernieM Guest

    <> wrote in message
    news:...
    > On 14 Jul, 06:32, "BernieM" <> wrote:
    >> "zillah" <> wrote in message
    >>
    >> news:...
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> >I have been given this scenario :

    >>
    >> > remote offices are connected to head quarter through WAN Frame Relay
    >> > Connection, speeds of these frame connection are either 64 kbps or 128
    >> > kbps.

    >>
    >> > users in remote site experience slow connection to their head quarter.
    >> > Applications are used as oracle database

    >>
    >> > What steps of troubleshooting should I follow to find out the source
    >> > of the problem ? is the bandwidth 64 or 128 are enough of 20 users or
    >> > more at each site ?

    >>
    >> > I do not have router's configuration to look at it

    >>
    >> > This link for troubleshooting would not help me
    >> >http://www.cisco.com/univercd/cc/td/doc/cisintwk/itg_v1/tr1918.htm

    >>
    >> You need to profile the application to determine what is a suitable
    >> bandwidth. By running a packet capture like Ethereal / Wireshark between
    >> the client and server you can determine how much data is returned by
    >> individual transactions. With that value you can calculate how much
    >> bandwidth is necessary to achieve acceptable user response times.

    >
    > You also need to consider the effect that the
    > distance netween the offices may have. For some
    > applications even a few hundred miles can make a big
    > difference, A few thousand miles renders many
    > applciations useless.
    >
    > The key here is the number of network level
    > request/response pairs per user operation. If it is
    > say 100 and the two machines are 3000 miles apart
    > then each user operation will take about
    > 100 x 0.1 second or 10 seconds. This is likely to
    > be unnaceptable.
    >
    > The Round Trip Time between New York and
    > London is about 0.070 seconds but can be more
    > if a less direct route is used.
    >
    >
    >

    Yes, all the turns in a transaction being affected by propagation delay and
    other delays which form the overall latency of wan links and long distance
    data transmission generally do take their toll on user response times.
    Unfortunately 'bandwidth' is often mistakenly named as the culprit for poor
    response when there are many other factors to consider. Some inhouse apps
    just aren't designed for wan use. We once had a scanning project in the
    pipeline and had a serious look at 'wan acceleration' technologies like
    those in Riverbed products and say some very impressive results. Having a
    look at the technology of products like these gives a better understanding
    of issues associated with delivering apps across a wan.
    http://www.riverbed.com/technology/
    BernieM, Jul 14, 2007
    #5
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. Andrzej

    ISDN router for remote offices

    Andrzej, Nov 4, 2003, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    387
    Sameer
    Nov 12, 2003
  2. Jarrod Lash

    Remote Offices with VOIP

    Jarrod Lash, Jul 7, 2004, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    399
    Jarrod Lash
    Jul 7, 2004
  3. Richard J. Collins  Ohio
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    458
    Richard J. Collins Ohio
    Sep 13, 2004
  4. Steven Potter

    Connect Remote offices to PBX

    Steven Potter, Nov 9, 2003, in forum: VOIP
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    820
    shido
    Nov 16, 2003
  5. zillah via HWKB.com

    Frame Relay -HQ-remote offices slow connection

    zillah via HWKB.com, Mar 5, 2007, in forum: Cisco
    Replies:
    9
    Views:
    395
    zillah via HWKB.com
    Mar 6, 2007
Loading...

Share This Page