Fox television DVDs

Discussion in 'DVD Video' started by Dave King, Aug 27, 2004.

  1. Dave King

    Dave King Guest

    Fox is creating DVDs from their television series'
    and specials like the Simpsons, 24, etc....why did
    Malcolm in the Middle, Season 1 come out ages
    ago without any releases since? According to
    Amazon.com, it sold very well and you'd think that
    they would want to continue to profit from it.

    DK
     
    Dave King, Aug 27, 2004
    #1
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  2. Dave King

    kaydigi Guest

    "Dave King" <> wrote in message
    news:XEAXc.27980$...
    > Fox is creating DVDs from their television series'
    > and specials like the Simpsons, 24, etc....why did
    > Malcolm in the Middle, Season 1 come out ages
    > ago without any releases since? According to
    > Amazon.com, it sold very well and you'd think that
    > they would want to continue to profit from it.
    >
    > DK
    >
    >


    It's going into syndication next month, so maybe it has something to do with
    it.
     
    kaydigi, Aug 27, 2004
    #2
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  3. "kaydigi" <> wrote in message
    news:rcBXc.5947$2B4.216@trnddc06...
    >
    > "Dave King" <> wrote in message
    > news:XEAXc.27980$...
    > > Fox is creating DVDs from their television series'
    > > and specials like the Simpsons, 24, etc....why did
    > > Malcolm in the Middle, Season 1 come out ages
    > > ago without any releases since? According to
    > > Amazon.com, it sold very well and you'd think that
    > > they would want to continue to profit from it.
    > >
    > > DK
    > >
    > >

    >
    > It's going into syndication next month, so maybe it has something to do

    with
    > it.


    Well, i'm still waiting for Volume 2 of Son of the Beach. They put out
    Volume One 18 months ago and I haven't seen hide, nor hair, of Notch's unit
    ever since.

    --
    ICEBREAKER
    "Everybody who is a person of color in this country has benefited from
    affirmative action. There has not been anybody who has gotten into college
    on their own, nobody who has gotten a job on their own, no one who has
    prospered as a businessman or businesswoman on their own without affirmative
    action."
     
    Desperately Seeking Icebreaker, Aug 27, 2004
    #3
  4. Dave King

    jayembee Guest

    "Dave King" <> wrote:

    > Fox is creating DVDs from their television series' and
    > specials like the Simpsons, 24, etc....why did Malcolm
    > in the Middle, Season 1 come out ages ago without any
    > releases since? According to Amazon.com, it sold very
    > well and you'd think that they would want to continue to
    > profit from it.


    "Sold very well" depends on one's point of view. The bottom
    line is whether it pulled in the dollars that were expected
    (or hoped for). That Amazon was happy doesn't necessarily
    mean that Fox was.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Aug 27, 2004
    #4
  5. Dave King

    JAM Guest

    jayembee wrote:
    > "Dave King" <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Fox is creating DVDs from their television series' and
    >>specials like the Simpsons, 24, etc....why did Malcolm
    >>in the Middle, Season 1 come out ages ago without any
    >>releases since? According to Amazon.com, it sold very
    >>well and you'd think that they would want to continue to
    >>profit from it.

    >
    >
    > "Sold very well" depends on one's point of view. The bottom
    > line is whether it pulled in the dollars that were expected
    > (or hoped for). That Amazon was happy doesn't necessarily
    > mean that Fox was.
    >
    > -- jayembee



    According to a news conference given by Fox about eight or nine months
    ago, Malcolm and other DVDs with music queues were being held up because
    of the cost of licencing the music queues. Fox says the Malcolm in the
    Middle DVD sold well and warrented a second season release, but they
    could not do it without further negotiations with the copyright holders
    of the music. This is a widespread problem in the television industry
    with regard to shows made prior to 2002. At the time of production, the
    music was licenced for broadcast and not for distribution in another
    medium. That is why in order to get some television shows released on
    DVD music queues had to be changed. Apparently Fox would like to
    release Malcolm in its original form as it was broadcast. I would like
    to see them release all the seasons with the original music intact. If
    it means that Fox needs to hold up future releases until they can make
    the appropriate deals, which may include the new syndication deals, then
    I am for it. I do wish they could find a way to get Malcolm season two
    released soon though. I enjoy the show, especially the first three
    seasons. I thought the show slipped a little during Jane's pregnancy,
    but I think it has since rebounded. I would buy all the seasons if they
    were released, but I prefer to have the music queues as they originally
    were broadcast. They were chosen for a reason, and I believe they
    enhance the stories.
     
    JAM, Aug 28, 2004
    #5
  6. Dave King

    Galley Guest

    On Sat, 28 Aug 2004 10:48:17 GMT, JAM <> spewed forth
    these words of wisdom:


    >
    >According to a news conference given by Fox about eight or nine months
    >ago, Malcolm and other DVDs with music queues were being held up because
    >of the cost of licencing the music queues. Fox says the Malcolm in the
    >Middle DVD sold well and warrented a second season release, but they
    >could not do it without further negotiations with the copyright holders
    >of the music. This is a widespread problem in the television industry
    >with regard to shows made prior to 2002. At the time of production, the
    >music was licenced for broadcast and not for distribution in another
    >medium. That is why in order to get some television shows released on
    >DVD music queues had to be changed. Apparently Fox would like to
    >release Malcolm in its original form as it was broadcast. I would like
    >to see them release all the seasons with the original music intact. If
    >it means that Fox needs to hold up future releases until they can make
    >the appropriate deals, which may include the new syndication deals, then
    >I am for it. I do wish they could find a way to get Malcolm season two
    >released soon though. I enjoy the show, especially the first three
    >seasons. I thought the show slipped a little during Jane's pregnancy,
    >but I think it has since rebounded. I would buy all the seasons if they
    >were released, but I prefer to have the music queues as they originally
    >were broadcast. They were chosen for a reason, and I believe they
    >enhance the stories.


    Are you saying that producers finally wised up in 2002 and licensed music for
    both broadcast and distribution in another medium? That should've been a
    no-brainer!

    --
    "I'm not a cool person in real life, but I play one on the Internet"
    Galley
     
    Galley, Aug 29, 2004
    #6
  7. Dave King

    jayembee Guest

    Galley <> wrote:

    >Are you saying that producers finally wised up in 2002 and licensed music for
    >both broadcast and distribution in another medium? That should've been a
    >no-brainer!


    Except that prior to that, TV series on home video were few and far
    between, because the syndication market was the primary aftermarket
    revenue generator.

    If the studio never intended to release a show on home video, what
    would be the point of spending extra money to obtain music licenses
    that covered that medium?

    It wasn't until TV on DVD really took off that they realized they did
    need to spend that extra money.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Aug 29, 2004
    #7
  8. Dave King

    Galley Guest

    On Sun, 29 Aug 2004 04:23:50 GMT, jayembee <> spewed
    forth these words of wisdom:

    >Galley <> wrote:
    >
    >>Are you saying that producers finally wised up in 2002 and licensed music for
    >>both broadcast and distribution in another medium? That should've been a
    >>no-brainer!

    >
    >Except that prior to that, TV series on home video were few and far
    >between, because the syndication market was the primary aftermarket
    >revenue generator.
    >
    >If the studio never intended to release a show on home video, what
    >would be the point of spending extra money to obtain music licenses
    >that covered that medium?
    >
    >It wasn't until TV on DVD really took off that they realized they did
    >need to spend that extra money.
    >
    >-- jayembee


    OK, that makes sense, but doesn't the same also apply to motion pictures when
    they were re-released on DVD?

    --
    "I'm not a cool person in real life, but I play one on the Internet"
    Galley
     
    Galley, Aug 30, 2004
    #8
  9. Dave King

    jayembee Guest

    Galley <> wrote:

    >jayembee <> spewed forth these words of wisdom:
    >
    >>Galley <> wrote:
    >>
    >>>Are you saying that producers finally wised up in 2002 and licensed music for
    >>>both broadcast and distribution in another medium? That should've been a
    >>>no-brainer!

    >>
    >>Except that prior to that, TV series on home video were few and far
    >>between, because the syndication market was the primary aftermarket
    >>revenue generator.
    >>
    >>If the studio never intended to release a show on home video, what
    >>would be the point of spending extra money to obtain music licenses
    >>that covered that medium?
    >>
    >>It wasn't until TV on DVD really took off that they realized they did
    >>need to spend that extra money.

    >
    >OK, that makes sense, but doesn't the same also apply to motion pictures when
    >they were re-released on DVD?


    No. The movie industry already learned that lesson back in the 80s.

    (1) A lot of movies, when released on videotape, had to have some
    music changed because the initial licenses applied only to the usual
    film distribution channels (theatrical and TV). Some films didn't come
    out for a *really* long time because of it (the most notorious example
    was HEAVY METAL, which took 17 years to come out on home video).

    (2) The infant CD industry ran into problems with a number of groups
    (the Beatles, Pink Floyd, and the Alan Parsons Project being the most
    notable examples) when their agents argued that CD was a completely
    new medium, and therefore the previous contracts didn't apply. The
    labels had to renegotiate a lot of contracts before they could release
    some albums on CD.

    The movie industry wasn't stupid, and the contracts from that point
    on probably included language that allowed for as-yet-undeveloped
    new media to fall under the "home video" rights. So the development
    of DVD didn't render the previous licenses null and void.

    -- jayembee
     
    jayembee, Aug 30, 2004
    #9
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