formatting new HDD

Discussion in 'Computer Information' started by chiropter, Aug 8, 2005.

  1. chiropter

    chiropter Guest

    Kind of primitive question:
    When you got a new HDD and prepare using the utility disk, it will give
    you choice of file system and you choose one.The disk is formatted in
    matter of second and readied for OS installation. Then the OS
    installation CD will ask you whether you want to keep the current file
    system or reformat the disk.
    If you select reformat option, it will take long, long time.
    My question is why it takes only seconds for the installation utility
    disk to format the new disk while the same job will take half an hour or
    longer with OS installation CD. If I elect the as-is option, will it
    cause any problem?
     
    chiropter, Aug 8, 2005
    #1
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  2. chiropter

    Robert Baer Guest

    chiropter wrote:

    > Kind of primitive question:
    > When you got a new HDD and prepare using the utility disk, it will give
    > you choice of file system and you choose one.The disk is formatted in
    > matter of second and readied for OS installation. Then the OS
    > installation CD will ask you whether you want to keep the current file
    > system or reformat the disk.
    > If you select reformat option, it will take long, long time.
    > My question is why it takes only seconds for the installation utility
    > disk to format the new disk while the same job will take half an hour or
    > longer with OS installation CD. If I elect the as-is option, will it
    > cause any problem?

    Obviously, the whole drive is *not* formatted.
    Perhaps only the partition sector and boot is written.
     
    Robert Baer, Aug 8, 2005
    #2
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  3. I agree, one is performing a quick format and the other is actually
    formatting the entire disk
     
    Gold Key Technology Solutions, Aug 8, 2005
    #3
  4. chiropter

    Fakename Guest

    Ever wondered what the difference is between a "quick format" and a
    "full format"? Basically, a full format does some error checking and
    quick format does not. And the name is deceptive (full format). The
    only true "full" format is a low-level format which is only
    accomplishable with special programs, usually from the hard drive
    manufacturer.

    So here's what I do. Whenever I'm rebuilding a computer I do a full HD
    scan using the manufacturer's diagnostic tools. If it checks out then I
    do a "quick format" to install the OS. A quick format DOES remove the
    files as much as any other program above the "low" level. But the
    manufacturer's diagnostic tools do a far better job of checking the
    drive and any other tools available, so you get the best of both worlds.



    Robert Baer wrote:
    > chiropter wrote:
    >
    >> Kind of primitive question:
    >> When you got a new HDD and prepare using the utility disk, it will
    >> give you choice of file system and you choose one.The disk is
    >> formatted in matter of second and readied for OS installation. Then
    >> the OS installation CD will ask you whether you want to keep the
    >> current file system or reformat the disk.
    >> If you select reformat option, it will take long, long time.
    >> My question is why it takes only seconds for the installation utility
    >> disk to format the new disk while the same job will take half an hour
    >> or longer with OS installation CD. If I elect the as-is option, will
    >> it cause any problem?

    >
    > Obviously, the whole drive is *not* formatted.
    > Perhaps only the partition sector and boot is written.
     
    Fakename, Aug 8, 2005
    #4
  5. chiropter

    derek / nul Guest

    On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 20:02:40 GMT, Fakename <> wrote:

    >Ever wondered what the difference is between a "quick format" and a
    >"full format"? Basically, a full format does some error checking and
    >quick format does not.


    A quick format clears the primary directory, nothing more.

    > And the name is deceptive (full format). The
    >only true "full" format is a low-level format which is only
    >accomplishable with special programs, usually from the hard drive
    >manufacturer.


    There is no such thing as a "low level format" any more since IDE drives were
    invented. The programs that are passed off as llf are only "zero fill"
    programs.

    >A quick format DOES remove the files


    No, it only removes the directory entries, the files are still there, you just
    cant find them.
     
    derek / nul, Aug 9, 2005
    #5
  6. chiropter

    Fakename Guest

    I can undelete files and partitions after a "full" format, so a "full"
    format does not "remove" the files much better than a "quick" format.

    A format with factory diagnostic tools can repair bad sector issues on a
    HD so no matter what you call it, it IS a "lower" format than you get
    from Windows or DOS, etc...

    derek / nul wrote:
    > On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 20:02:40 GMT, Fakename <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Ever wondered what the difference is between a "quick format" and a
    >>"full format"? Basically, a full format does some error checking and
    >>quick format does not.

    >
    >
    > A quick format clears the primary directory, nothing more.
    >
    >
    >> And the name is deceptive (full format). The
    >>only true "full" format is a low-level format which is only
    >>accomplishable with special programs, usually from the hard drive
    >>manufacturer.

    >
    >
    > There is no such thing as a "low level format" any more since IDE drives were
    > invented. The programs that are passed off as llf are only "zero fill"
    > programs.
    >
    >
    >>A quick format DOES remove the files

    >
    >
    > No, it only removes the directory entries, the files are still there, you just
    > cant find them.
    >
    >
     
    Fakename, Aug 9, 2005
    #6
  7. chiropter

    Robert Baer Guest

    Fakename wrote:

    > I can undelete files and partitions after a "full" format, so a "full"
    > format does not "remove" the files much better than a "quick" format.
    >
    > A format with factory diagnostic tools can repair bad sector issues on a
    > HD so no matter what you call it, it IS a "lower" format than you get
    > from Windows or DOS, etc...
    >
    > derek / nul wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 08 Aug 2005 20:02:40 GMT, Fakename <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Ever wondered what the difference is between a "quick format" and a
    >>> "full format"? Basically, a full format does some error checking and
    >>> quick format does not.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> A quick format clears the primary directory, nothing more.
    >>
    >>
    >>> And the name is deceptive (full format). The only true "full" format
    >>> is a low-level format which is only accomplishable with special
    >>> programs, usually from the hard drive manufacturer.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> There is no such thing as a "low level format" any more since IDE
    >> drives were
    >> invented. The programs that are passed off as llf are only "zero fill"
    >> programs.
    >>
    >>
    >>> A quick format DOES remove the files

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> No, it only removes the directory entries, the files are still there,
    >> you just
    >> cant find them.
    >>
    >>

    A "full format" was never intended to remove anything, ever.
     
    Robert Baer, Aug 10, 2005
    #7
  8. chiropter

    Plato Guest

    Robert Baer wrote:
    >
    > A "full format" was never intended to remove anything, ever.


    A full format is like me going into my file cabinet and ripping off the
    first letter on each label on my file folders, that's it.









    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Aug 10, 2005
    #8
  9. chiropter

    Plato Guest

    Fakename wrote:
    >
    > do a "quick format" to install the OS. A quick format DOES remove the
    > files as much as any other program above the "low" level. But the


    Neither a quick or full format removes ANY files. All the files are
    still there. All it does is format, that's it.







    --
    http://www.bootdisk.com/
     
    Plato, Aug 10, 2005
    #9
  10. chiropter

    Chiropter Guest

    So, what is your conclusion?
    If I choose "as is" option in Win2K installation for instance, which
    takes no time, would there be any chance to undergo unwanted problems
    later? I suppose that Windows must be sure of integrity of drive's
    format status or disk surface---I don't think the Windows' careful
    design just trusts in the existing conditions.

    chiropter wrote:

    > Kind of primitive question:
    > When you got a new HDD and prepare using the utility disk, it will
    > give you choice of file system and you choose one.The disk is
    > formatted in matter of second and readied for OS installation. Then
    > the OS installation CD will ask you whether you want to keep the
    > current file system or reformat the disk.
    > If you select reformat option, it will take long, long time.
    > My question is why it takes only seconds for the installation utility
    > disk to format the new disk while the same job will take half an hour
    > or longer with OS installation CD. If I elect the as-is option, will
    > it cause any problem?
     
    Chiropter, Aug 11, 2005
    #10
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