Formatting C: - detailed processes.

Discussion in 'NZ Computing' started by Crash, Dec 20, 2005.

  1. Crash

    Crash Guest

    Ah yeah G'day,

    I have a machine currently running Windows Me and I have used Partition Magic to
    set up a c drive on disk 1 ( a 4 gig drive) and a number of other drives (D, E F
    and G) on disk 2 (an 80 gig drive). The swap file is on G.

    For various reasons there are remnants of applications that did not completely
    uninstall when I attempted to clean out old no-longer-used applications (using
    control panel/ad-delete programs. The pedigree of this box goes back to WIN 98
    so its probably time to format c and re-install. My objective here is a clean,
    new OS install (with new windows registry and no applications).

    I have never done this and I wonder if you can simply format c: then run set-up
    off the Me CD? How does Windows (or DOS) continue to run?

    Would anyone care to give me a blow-by-blow description of the preparation and
    execution of getting Me re-installed on a new C drive?

    Alternatively can I install Me to (say) D drive and permanently use it from there?
     
    Crash, Dec 20, 2005
    #1
    1. Advertising

  2. John in Surrey, Dec 20, 2005
    #2
    1. Advertising

  3. Crash

    Peter Guest

    Crash wrote:
    >
    > I have a machine currently running Windows Me and I have used Partition
    > Magic to set up a c drive on disk 1 ( a 4 gig drive) and a number of other
    > drives (D, E F
    > and G) on disk 2 (an 80 gig drive). The swap file is on G.
    >
    > For various reasons there are remnants of applications that did not
    > completely uninstall when I attempted to clean out old no-longer-used
    > applications (using
    > control panel/ad-delete programs. The pedigree of this box goes back to
    > WIN 98
    > so its probably time to format c and re-install. My objective here is a
    > clean, new OS install (with new windows registry and no applications).
    >
    > I have never done this and I wonder if you can simply format c: then run
    > set-up
    > off the Me CD? How does Windows (or DOS) continue to run?


    First make a backup of your data, take a note of all the product ID keys,
    and gather up all your drivers for hardware & devices.

    Depending you your hardware, you may be able to boot off the CD drive with
    the Win install CD. Otherwise, you need a boot floppy with CD drivers on
    it. IIRC there are floppy images available on the net.

    It's been a couple of years since I did a Windows install, but the basic
    install wasn't difficult. The tedious part is finding all the different
    drivers and tools, entering all those product IDs, and rebooting umpteen
    times.

    But it is worth doing on those 95/98/ME installs, as uninstalled programmes
    tend to leave debris behind.

    HTH

    Peter
     
    Peter, Dec 20, 2005
    #3
  4. Crash

    GraB Guest

    On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:24:56 +1300, Crash
    <> wrote:

    >Ah yeah G'day,
    >
    >I have a machine currently running Windows Me and I have used Partition Magic to
    >set up a c drive on disk 1 ( a 4 gig drive) and a number of other drives (D, E F
    >and G) on disk 2 (an 80 gig drive). The swap file is on G.
    >
    >For various reasons there are remnants of applications that did not completely
    >uninstall when I attempted to clean out old no-longer-used applications (using
    >control panel/ad-delete programs. The pedigree of this box goes back to WIN 98
    >so its probably time to format c and re-install. My objective here is a clean,
    >new OS install (with new windows registry and no applications).
    >
    >I have never done this and I wonder if you can simply format c: then run set-up
    >off the Me CD? How does Windows (or DOS) continue to run?
    >
    >Would anyone care to give me a blow-by-blow description of the preparation and
    >execution of getting Me re-installed on a new C drive?
    >
    >Alternatively can I install Me to (say) D drive and permanently use it from there?


    Why don't you make the 80Gig drive as disc 1? It would be a faster
    drive to operate from. Putting the swap file on G: drive is putting
    it at the back end of the drive, where it is slowest. I have Norton
    Utilities 2002 and use that to put the swap file at the beginning of
    C: drive where it can be accessed fastest.

    Do you really need so many drives? A very good idea is to copy the
    installation folder from the CD onto, say, D: drive and do the install
    from there. Much faster. Also, when Windows needs the Windows CD it
    would know to look on D: drive. That is how I install 98SE, though I
    also use 98Lite to slim it down.

    You need a boot disc. If you format C: drive, you can't do it when
    Windows is running, if it is installed on C: drive - it won't let you.
     
    GraB, Dec 20, 2005
    #4
  5. Crash

    nobody760 Guest

  6. Crash

    Enkidu Guest

    GraB wrote:
    >>
    >> Would anyone care to give me a blow-by-blow description of the
    >> preparation and execution of getting Me re-installed on a new C
    >> drive?
    >>

    >
    > You need a boot disc. If you format C: drive, you can't do it when
    > Windows is running, if it is installed on C: drive - it won't let
    > you.
    >

    You don't need a boot disk. Insert the CD, boot from it and during the
    install process select 'new' and it should allow you to remove the
    partitions and recreate them. The words may be slightly different but
    that's the process, assuming ME does it the same way as all other recent
    Windows versions.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Dec 20, 2005
    #6
  7. Crash

    GraB Guest

    On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 09:01:09 +1300, Enkidu <>
    wrote:

    >GraB wrote:
    >>>
    >>> Would anyone care to give me a blow-by-blow description of the
    >>> preparation and execution of getting Me re-installed on a new C
    >>> drive?
    >>>

    >>
    >> You need a boot disc. If you format C: drive, you can't do it when
    >> Windows is running, if it is installed on C: drive - it won't let
    >> you.
    > >

    >You don't need a boot disk. Insert the CD, boot from it and during the
    >install process select 'new' and it should allow you to remove the
    >partitions and recreate them. The words may be slightly different but
    >that's the process, assuming ME does it the same way as all other recent
    >Windows versions.
    >

    You do need a boot disc if you do it the way I suggested - copying the
    Windows installation files to D: drive and installing from there.
     
    GraB, Dec 20, 2005
    #7
  8. Crash

    Crash Guest

    John in Surrey wrote:
    > On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:24:56 +1300, Crash
    > <> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Ah yeah G'day,
    >>

    >
    > gezz man, just format the drive, boot to the ME cd and install...


    Thanks - but my Me CD is not bootable...

    Crash
     
    Crash, Dec 21, 2005
    #8
  9. Crash

    Charlie G Guest

    "Crash" <> wrote in message
    news:fT3qf.9453$...
    > John in Surrey wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:24:56 +1300, Crash
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Ah yeah G'day,
    >>>

    >>
    >> gezz man, just format the drive, boot to the ME cd and install...

    >
    > Thanks - but my Me CD is not bootable...
    >
    > Crash


    OK - then you ned to make a restore disk - hope you still have a floppy
    drive?

    You need to go to control panel, add remove programs, windows startup disk.

    A couple of hiccups you may want to watch out for. Your install disk needs
    to be same version as CD you are installing from, so can't make a Win ME
    disk from WIN 98 system or vice versa.

    You may have trouble doing a fresh install from an udgrade CD. You can do
    it as long as you have your original CD. If your ME is an upgrade, you'll
    be asked for your WIN 98 CD. will read that, then prompt for the ME Cd
    again.


    You will also probably have trouble installing from a full CD if you have
    an earlier version of windows still on the drive.

    And as another poster has said, try and get all your drivers together before
    you wipe the disk.
     
    Charlie G, Dec 21, 2005
    #9
  10. On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 15:39:34 +1300, Crash
    <> wrote:

    >John in Surrey wrote:
    >> On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:24:56 +1300, Crash
    >> <> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>Ah yeah G'day,
    >>>

    >>
    >> gezz man, just format the drive, boot to the ME cd and install...

    >
    >Thanks - but my Me CD is not bootable...


    All the WindowsMe OEM & Retail CD's I've seen are bootable.

    Not that I would recommend installing that OS.. ever ;)

    --
    Kristofer Clayton (KJClayton)
    Gisborne, New Zealand
     
    Kristofer Clayton, Dec 21, 2005
    #10
  11. Crash

    Crash Guest

    Charlie G wrote:
    > "Crash" <> wrote in message
    > news:fT3qf.9453$...
    >
    >>John in Surrey wrote:
    >>
    >>>On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:24:56 +1300, Crash
    >>><> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>>Ah yeah G'day,
    >>>>
    >>>
    >>>gezz man, just format the drive, boot to the ME cd and install...

    >>
    >>Thanks - but my Me CD is not bootable...
    >>
    >>Crash

    >
    >
    > OK - then you ned to make a restore disk - hope you still have a floppy
    > drive?
    >
    > You need to go to control panel, add remove programs, windows startup disk.
    >
    > A couple of hiccups you may want to watch out for. Your install disk needs
    > to be same version as CD you are installing from, so can't make a Win ME
    > disk from WIN 98 system or vice versa.
    >
    > You may have trouble doing a fresh install from an udgrade CD. You can do
    > it as long as you have your original CD. If your ME is an upgrade, you'll
    > be asked for your WIN 98 CD. will read that, then prompt for the ME Cd
    > again.
    >
    >
    > You will also probably have trouble installing from a full CD if you have
    > an earlier version of windows still on the drive.
    >
    > And as another poster has said, try and get all your drivers together before
    > you wipe the disk.
    >
    >

    Many thanks to all contributors for the help on this.

    I am currently considering upgrading to XP home - all the other PCs at home are
    XP - and the networking side is a bit more reliable IM limited E. If I do this
    then I will install to D drive at take thinks from there. If I stick with Me
    then the bootable floppies is seems a good approach.

    Because this is a 'file server' pc there is no special hardware (even with XP).
    The few applications I need can easily be re-installed.

    One last related question though.... The switch I use is part of a router that
    also provides the ADSL connection. The hardware is a D-LINK 504G. Therefore
    the server is exposed to the internet and this is handy for windows update/AV.
    Do I need a firewall as well? If so is the XP firewall good enough?

    Again, many thanks.

    Crash
     
    Crash, Dec 21, 2005
    #11
  12. Crash

    Enkidu Guest

    Crash wrote:
    > Charlie G wrote:
    >
    >> "Crash" <> wrote in message
    >> news:fT3qf.9453$...
    >>
    >>> John in Surrey wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 21:24:56 +1300, Crash
    >>>> <> wrote:
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>
    >>>>> Ah yeah G'day,
    >>>>>
    >>>>
    >>>> gezz man, just format the drive, boot to the ME cd and install...
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> Thanks - but my Me CD is not bootable...
    >>>
    >>> Crash

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> OK - then you ned to make a restore disk - hope you still have a
    >> floppy drive?
    >>
    >> You need to go to control panel, add remove programs, windows startup
    >> disk.
    >>
    >> A couple of hiccups you may want to watch out for. Your install disk
    >> needs to be same version as CD you are installing from, so can't make
    >> a Win ME disk from WIN 98 system or vice versa.
    >>
    >> You may have trouble doing a fresh install from an udgrade CD. You
    >> can do it as long as you have your original CD. If your ME is an
    >> upgrade, you'll be asked for your WIN 98 CD. will read that, then
    >> prompt for the ME Cd again.
    >>
    >>
    >> You will also probably have trouble installing from a full CD if you
    >> have an earlier version of windows still on the drive.
    >>
    >> And as another poster has said, try and get all your drivers together
    >> before you wipe the disk.
    >>
    >>

    > Many thanks to all contributors for the help on this.
    >
    > I am currently considering upgrading to XP home - all the other PCs at
    > home are XP - and the networking side is a bit more reliable IM limited
    > E. If I do this then I will install to D drive at take thinks from
    > there. If I stick with Me then the bootable floppies is seems a good
    > approach.
    >
    > Because this is a 'file server' pc there is no special hardware (even
    > with XP). The few applications I need can easily be re-installed.
    >
    > One last related question though.... The switch I use is part of a
    > router that also provides the ADSL connection. The hardware is a D-LINK
    > 504G. Therefore the server is exposed to the internet and this is handy
    > for windows update/AV. Do I need a firewall as well? If so is the XP
    > firewall good enough?
    >

    The server is NOT exposed to the Internet if you use a 504. I have a 504
    (not the wireless model though), and it gives reasonably good protection
    from the Internet.

    Do you use DHCP or do you use static IP addresses? If you connected the
    504 and have not changed anything in it, then it will try and pass out
    DHCP address of the form 192.168.x.x which are private IP addresses.
    These are not sent over the Internet.

    The 504 works by allowing all outgoing connections, but does not by
    default allow any incoming connections from the Internet. So you are
    reasonably safe. A firewall is never a bad idea, though.

    If you want people to access machines connected to the private side of
    the device, then you will need to specifically 'pinhole' the appropriate
    port to the internal machine.

    Think of the 504 as a router (connected to the Internet) and a switch
    connected to the router. The router part provides some protection by
    packet filtering.

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Dec 21, 2005
    #12
  13. Crash

    steve Guest

    Crash wrote:

    > Would anyone care to give me a blow-by-blow description of the preparation
    > and execution of getting Me re-installed on a new C drive?


    You'd have to boot from a floppy......and I think WinME may only offer you
    the opportunity to make a "Rescue diskette".....

    Win98SE allowed a true boot floppy....and I keep a copy around just for that
    purpose.

    Assuming you have the partition in place and you're installing from a WinME
    *upgrade* CD:

    1. Boot from the floppy.
    2. "format c:" from the command prompt.
    3. When format is complete, run setup.exe from the CD,

    You may wish to copy the contents of the \win98 (\winme - don't remember)
    directory on the CD to the hard drive after formatting, but before running
    setup.exe...as sometimes the Windows install loses sight of the CD drive
    part way through the install.....and unless you can point it to the
    required files on the hard disk (the only thing it can se at that point)
    you're screwed and the install can't proceed. You can also run the entire
    install from the hard drive by starting it off with the setup.exe in the
    \win98 directory you copied onto the hard drive.

    4. Go through the install. You need the xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx CD code AND the
    install media from the previous release of Windows (Win98/Win98SE or maybe
    Win95) in order to do the "upgrade". It will ask you to insert the prior
    level CD and click OK.....then you remove it and put the install CD back
    in when prompted.

    5. The install will put in place whatever drivers it knows about....and you
    will have to have handy and driver disks / CDs it doesn't know about..

    Be aware that some devices need the drivers in place BEFORE you insert the
    card or connect the device....and they won't work if you install the
    drivers for the first time while the device is already installed. My DSE
    802.11b wireless adaptor is like that. There are others - an older Pinnacle
    USB TV video capture device is such that I have.

    By the end of that.....you should be sweet.

    But the first 4 steps are the most critical if installing from a WinME
    upgrade CD.

    If it's a full system CD, You'd just boot the CD and go for it.
     
    steve, Dec 21, 2005
    #13
  14. Crash

    steve Guest

    Crash wrote:

    > Because this is a 'file server' pc there is no special hardware (even with
    > XP). The few applications I need can easily be re-installed.


    If it's just a file server, install a basic Linux system and set it up as a
    file / print server.

    Clark Connect Home 3.2 is easy, simple, free and takes about 10 minutes to
    install.

    Turn on Samba and define the shares....then maintain it via your web
    browser.

    Honestly, if Clark Connect Home was any easier, dead people could do it.
     
    steve, Dec 21, 2005
    #14
  15. Crash

    Crash Guest

    steve wrote:
    > Crash wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Because this is a 'file server' pc there is no special hardware (even with
    >>XP). The few applications I need can easily be re-installed.

    >
    >
    > If it's just a file server, install a basic Linux system and set it up as a
    > file / print server.
    >
    > Clark Connect Home 3.2 is easy, simple, free and takes about 10 minutes to
    > install.
    >
    > Turn on Samba and define the shares....then maintain it via your web
    > browser.
    >
    > Honestly, if Clark Connect Home was any easier, dead people could do it.
    >
    >

    Hi Steve,

    Thanks for this and the previous post.

    I have since decided to buy XP home (OEM version - I really needed the $6 USB
    extension cord honest). The package has arrived severely crushed but the CD is
    intact. I booted to it and got it to to the 'upgrade check' and it said that
    this version could not be used to upgrade Me. Not entirely unexpected but it
    means back to boot floppies and format C:. Note I currently use c: only for
    windows, installing application programs and files compulsorily put there.

    I am tempted to consider Linux - but I really do not want to learn a new OS
    (however simple it is) at present.

    Crash.
     
    Crash, Dec 22, 2005
    #15
  16. Crash

    steve Guest

    steve, Dec 22, 2005
    #16
  17. Crash

    Enkidu Guest

    Crash wrote:
    > steve wrote:
    >
    >> Crash wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> Because this is a 'file server' pc there is no special hardware (even
    >>> with
    >>> XP). The few applications I need can easily be re-installed.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> If it's just a file server, install a basic Linux system and set it up
    >> as a
    >> file / print server.
    >> Clark Connect Home 3.2 is easy, simple, free and takes about 10
    >> minutes to
    >> install.
    >> Turn on Samba and define the shares....then maintain it via your web
    >> browser.
    >> Honestly, if Clark Connect Home was any easier, dead people could do it.
    >>

    > Hi Steve,
    >
    > Thanks for this and the previous post.
    >
    > I have since decided to buy XP home (OEM version - I really needed the
    > $6 USB extension cord honest). The package has arrived severely crushed
    > but the CD is intact. I booted to it and got it to to the 'upgrade
    > check' and it said that this version could not be used to upgrade Me.
    > Not entirely unexpected but it means back to boot floppies and format
    > C:. Note I currently use c: only for windows, installing application
    > programs and files compulsorily put there.
    >

    If you haven't got anything on there that you want boot from the CD and
    do a 'new install', not an upgrade. You will then be asked about
    prtitions, at which stage you can remove any partitions you don't want,
    recreate them, and then they will be formatted for you during the install.

    Sheesh! WHY do people make things difficult for themselves by using
    floppy disks?


    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Dec 22, 2005
    #17
  18. Crash

    Crash Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Crash wrote:
    >
    >> steve wrote:
    >>
    >>> Crash wrote:
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>> Because this is a 'file server' pc there is no special hardware
    >>>> (even with
    >>>> XP). The few applications I need can easily be re-installed.
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>>
    >>> If it's just a file server, install a basic Linux system and set it
    >>> up as a
    >>> file / print server.
    >>> Clark Connect Home 3.2 is easy, simple, free and takes about 10
    >>> minutes to
    >>> install.
    >>> Turn on Samba and define the shares....then maintain it via your web
    >>> browser.
    >>> Honestly, if Clark Connect Home was any easier, dead people could do it.
    >>>

    >> Hi Steve,
    >>
    >> Thanks for this and the previous post.
    >>
    >> I have since decided to buy XP home (OEM version - I really needed the
    >> $6 USB extension cord honest). The package has arrived severely
    >> crushed but the CD is intact. I booted to it and got it to to the
    >> 'upgrade check' and it said that this version could not be used to
    >> upgrade Me. Not entirely unexpected but it means back to boot
    >> floppies and format C:. Note I currently use c: only for windows,
    >> installing application programs and files compulsorily put there.
    >>

    > If you haven't got anything on there that you want boot from the CD and
    > do a 'new install', not an upgrade. You will then be asked about
    > prtitions, at which stage you can remove any partitions you don't want,
    > recreate them, and then they will be formatted for you during the install.
    >
    > Sheesh! WHY do people make things difficult for themselves by using
    > floppy disks?


    Your right Cliff. I just tried booting from the new XP CD and it behaved quite
    differently to when I (thought I had) tried the same thing earlier today -
    showing a far cruder GUI than normal so I presume that if I had gone ahead with
    an XP install I would have been given the options you describe.. However I
    always want to be in a position to return to Me if any part of the XP install
    turns to custard and this would seem to me to require working Me boot disk(s) of
    which my Me CD is not one.

    So I will give this a go some time when I have at least 3 hours to spare -
    probably over this weekend.

    Many thanks for the help.

    Crash.
     
    Crash, Dec 22, 2005
    #18
  19. Crash

    Crash Guest

    Enkidu wrote:
    > Crash wrote:

    [snip]
    >>
    >> One last related question though.... The switch I use is part of a
    >> router that also provides the ADSL connection. The hardware is a
    >> D-LINK 504G. Therefore the server is exposed to the internet and this
    >> is handy for windows update/AV. Do I need a firewall as well? If so
    >> is the XP firewall good enough?
    >>

    > The server is NOT exposed to the Internet if you use a 504. I have a 504
    > (not the wireless model though), and it gives reasonably good protection
    > from the Internet.
    >
    > Do you use DHCP or do you use static IP addresses? If you connected the
    > 504 and have not changed anything in it, then it will try and pass out
    > DHCP address of the form 192.168.x.x which are private IP addresses.
    > These are not sent over the Internet.
    >
    > The 504 works by allowing all outgoing connections, but does not by
    > default allow any incoming connections from the Internet. So you are
    > reasonably safe. A firewall is never a bad idea, though.
    >
    > If you want people to access machines connected to the private side of
    > the device, then you will need to specifically 'pinhole' the appropriate
    > port to the internal machine.
    >
    > Think of the 504 as a router (connected to the Internet) and a switch
    > connected to the router. The router part provides some protection by
    > packet filtering.


    Yes I am using the standard DSL-504G - with DHCP. However IPCONFIG /all on my
    XP pro box reports a 10.1.1.2 ip address. I presume though that the principles
    above still apply - just that where you say '192.168.x.x' I can substitute 10.1.1.x.

    Thanks again...

    Crash.
     
    Crash, Dec 22, 2005
    #19
  20. Crash

    Enkidu Guest

    Crash wrote:
    > Enkidu wrote:
    >
    >> Crash wrote:

    >
    > [snip]
    >
    >>>
    >>> One last related question though.... The switch I use is part of a
    >>> router that also provides the ADSL connection. The hardware is a
    >>> D-LINK 504G. Therefore the server is exposed to the internet and
    >>> this is handy for windows update/AV. Do I need a firewall as well?
    >>> If so is the XP firewall good enough?
    >>>

    >> The server is NOT exposed to the Internet if you use a 504. I have a
    >> 504 (not the wireless model though), and it gives reasonably good
    >> protection from the Internet.
    >>
    >> Do you use DHCP or do you use static IP addresses? If you connected
    >> the 504 and have not changed anything in it, then it will try and pass
    >> out DHCP address of the form 192.168.x.x which are private IP
    >> addresses. These are not sent over the Internet.
    >>
    >> The 504 works by allowing all outgoing connections, but does not by
    >> default allow any incoming connections from the Internet. So you are
    >> reasonably safe. A firewall is never a bad idea, though.
    >>
    >> If you want people to access machines connected to the private side of
    >> the device, then you will need to specifically 'pinhole' the
    >> appropriate port to the internal machine.
    >>
    >> Think of the 504 as a router (connected to the Internet) and a switch
    >> connected to the router. The router part provides some protection by
    >> packet filtering.

    >
    >
    > Yes I am using the standard DSL-504G - with DHCP. However IPCONFIG /all
    > on my XP pro box reports a 10.1.1.2 ip address. I presume though that
    > the principles above still apply - just that where you say '192.168.x.x'
    > I can substitute 10.1.1.x.
    >

    OK, my DSL504 dishes out 192.168 private addresses. Yours appears to
    dish out 10.x.x.x private addresses. Interesting. They are still private
    IPs and are therefore not routed outside the local network (or sometimes
    the ISP's network).

    Cheers,

    Cliff
     
    Enkidu, Dec 22, 2005
    #20
    1. Advertising

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

It takes just 2 minutes to sign up (and it's free!). Just click the sign up button to choose a username and then you can ask your own questions on the forum.
Similar Threads
  1. kev
    Replies:
    1
    Views:
    7,136
    micke
    Sep 21, 2004
  2. =?Utf-8?B?Um9iQ2hpY2Fnbw==?=

    Detailed configuration for Wireless Network wizard

    =?Utf-8?B?Um9iQ2hpY2Fnbw==?=, Apr 12, 2006, in forum: Wireless Networking
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    415
    =?Utf-8?B?Um9iQ2hpY2Fnbw==?=
    Apr 12, 2006
  3. Replies:
    9
    Views:
    14,048
  4. Mark T.
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    1,025
    Dan Boyd
    Nov 24, 2003
  5. hugh jass

    Best app or method to communicate detailed tasks?

    hugh jass, Mar 17, 2005, in forum: Computer Support
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    540
    hugh jass
    Mar 17, 2005
Loading...

Share This Page